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Computational Imaging XVIII

Conference Keywords: Inverse Problems, Image Reconstruction, Image Analysis, Denoising, Model-based Imaging

COIMG XVIII 2020 Call for Papers PDF

Conference Special Sessions - Submissions Invited

Algorithm/Hardware Co-Design for Computational Imaging
Organizers: Sergio Goma (Qualcomm Technologies Inc.) and Hasib Saddiqui (Qualcomm Technologies Inc.)

The aim of this session is to take computational imaging concepts a step further and to set a stepping stone towards an optimal, technology dependent implementation of computational imaging: algorithm-hardware co-design. Complex algorithms thrive on clean data sets therefore sensors that are designed in conjunction with supporting algorithms can offer significantly improved results. This session is soliciting original contributions that relate to the joint design of sensors and/or technology in conjunction with algorithms.

Computational Imaging Applications to Materials Characterization
Organizers: Jeff Simmons (Air Force Research Laboratory) and Stephen Niezgoda (The Ohio State University)

Materials science, like physics, focuses on forward modeling almost exclusively for analysis. This creates opportunities for imaging scientists to make significant advances by introducing modern, inversion-based methods for analysis of microscope imagery. Materials Science emerged as a true ``scientific'' discipline, with the development of microscopy because it allowed the materials scientist to observe the ``microstructure,'' that is, the texture produced by the processes used for preparing the material. For this reason, materials science and microscopy have always been intimately linked, with the major connection being microstructure as a means of controlling properties. Until quite recently materials characterization was largely ``photons-on-film.'' With the digital transition of microscopy from film to data file, microscopy became a computational imaging problem. With the automation of data collection, it became imperative to develop algorithms requiring less human interaction. This session highlights recent advances in materials science as a direct consequence of cross-disciplinary approaches between computational imaging and materials science. This session covers, but is not limited to, forward modeling of material-probe-detector interactions, segmentation, anomaly detection, data fusion, denoising, learning approaches, detection and tracking, and super-resolution.

Recent Progress in Computational Microscopy
Organizers: Singanallur V Venkatakrishnan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Ulugbek S Kamilov (Washington University in St. Louis)

Microscopy is currently experiencing an exciting era of new methodological developments with computation at its core. The recent progress in compressive imaging, numerical physical models, regularization techniques, large-scale optimization methods, and machine learning are leading to a faster, quantitative, and reliable microscopic imaging. Though many computational methods are being developed independently for different modalities, their combination may be seen as example of a new paradigm of rapid, comprehensive, and information-rich computational microscopy. This session will explore cross-cutting themes in several modalities such as optical, neutron, x-ray, and electron microscopy and will attempt to promote transfer of ideas between investigators in these different areas.

Optically-Coherent and Interferometric Imaging
Organizer: Casey Pellizzari (United States Air Force Academy) 

Optically-coherent and interferometric imaging sensors provide a means to measure both the amplitude and phase of incoming light. These sensors depend on computational-based methods to convert real-valued intensity measurements into amplitude and phase information for image reconstruction. Additionally, computational methods have helped overcome many of the practical issues associated with these sensors as well as enabled new imaging modalities. This session explores the coupling between optically-coherent and interferometric sensors and the computational methods that enable and extend their use. Example topic areas include both coherent and incoherent holography, coherent lidar, microscopy, metrology, and astronomy.

Conference Hot Topics

Submissions that address computational imaging aspects in the following are welcome:

  • Machine learning for imaging and reconstruction
  • Multi-sensor fusion
  • Scientific imaging
  • Autonomous sensing and imaging
  • Time-space and high-dimensional imaging
  • Microscopy
  • Mobile imaging

Conference Topics Ongoing

See the Overview tab and Topics tab above. Submissions within the scope of this technical content are welcome.

Ways to Submit

There are four options for submission; please read the descriptions carefully.

  1. Presentation at the conference and publication in the conference proceedings. This is the most common option, and if accepted may be assigned either an oral or interactive (poster) presentation.Submit a 1,000-word structured abstract (using template, with option to add figures) using the symposium template 
  2. Presentation-only. Oral presentation at the conference, but no publication of work in the conference proceedings. Submit a 500-word short abstract 
  3. JPI-first. Expedited review and publication in the Journal of Perceptual Imaging (JPI) before the conference, oral presentation at the conference, and inclusion in the conference proceedings. To meet the publication timeline, successful JPI-first submissions (journal paper, typically 10 or more pages) must require only minor revisions in response to peer-review. Those not meeting this stringent standard are automatically re-considered for presentation at the conference and publication in the proceedings (option 1 above). Author instructions for journal submissions  
  4. JIST-first. Expedited review and publication in the Journal of Imaging Science and Technology [SCI/EI-indexed] before the conference, oral presentation at the conference, and inclusion in the conference proceedings. To meet the publication timeline, successful JIST-first submissions (journal paper, typically 10 or more pages) must require only minor revisions in response to peer-review. Those not meeting this stringent standard are automatically re-considered for presentation at the conference and publication in the proceedings (option 1 above). Author instructions for journal submissions  

Final Manuscript Deadline

Manuscripts are submitted to the separate manuscript system via a custom link given to each accepted author. Final manuscripts (typically 4-6 pages) submitted in correct form by 25 November 2019 will be published online as of the opening day of EI 2020 via the Fast Track queue in the EI Digital Library. Manuscripts submitted or corrected after that date will be published online after EI 2020 in the complete conference proceedings. All manuscripts are due, in corrected form, by 10 February 2020.


Stephen Niezgoda

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Important Dates
Call for Papers Announced 1 April 2019
Journal-first Submissions Due 15 Jul 2019
Abstract Submission Site Opens 1 May 2019
Review Abstracts Due (refer to For Authors page
· Early Decision Ends 15 Jul 2019
· Regular Submission Ends 30 Sept 2019
· Extended Submission Ends 14 Oct 2019
 Final Manuscript Deadlines  
 · Manuscripts for Fast Track 25 Nov 2019
 · All Manuscripts 10 Feb 2020
Registration Opens 5 Nov 2019
Early Registration Ends 7 Jan 2019
Hotel Reservation Deadline 6  Jan 2020
Conference Begins 26 Jan 2020


 
View 2019 Proceedings
View 2018 Proceedings
View 2017 Proceedings
View 2016 Proceedings

Conference Chairs
Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University (United States); Gregery T. Buzzard, Purdue University (United States); Robert L. Stevenson, University of Notre Dame (United States)

Program Committee
Clem Karl, Boston University (United States); Eric Miller, Tufts University (United States); Joseph A O'Sullivan, Washington University in St. Louis (United States); Hector J Santos-Villalobos, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Ken D. Sauer, University of Notre Dame (United States)

Computational Microscopy Special Session Organizers
Singanallur V Venkatakrishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Ulugbek S Kamilov, Washington University in St. Louis (United States)

Optically-Coherent and Interferometric Imaging Special Session Organizer
Casey Pellizzari, United States Air Force Academy (United States)

Computational Imaging Applications to Materials Characterization Special Session Organizers
Jeff Simmons, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Stephen Niezgoda, The Ohio State University (United States)

Algorithm/Hardware Co-Design for Computational Imaging Special Session Organizers
Sergio Goma, Qualcomm Technologies Inc. (United States); Hasib Saddiqui, Qualcomm Technologies Inc. (United States)