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IMPORTANT DATES
 Call for Papers Deadlines
 
  » Journal-first (JIST) 10 May
  » Conference
 » Presentation Only
15 June
13 Sept
 Registration Opens mid Aug
 Acceptance Notification  
  » Conference 2 July
  » Journal-first  9 Aug
 Final Manuscripts Due  
  » Journal-first
by 13 Aug
  » Conference   13 Sept 
 Early Registration Ends  3 Oct
 Conference Begins
11 Oct
   

Print4Fab Educational Program 2021

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Course Program Overview

Live Course

SC12: Color Fever: the Printing of an Illusion, is a new course that will be taught simultaneously for both Printing for Fabrication and Color Imaging  Conference audiences. This course discusses how color is generated when electromagnetic waves interact with matter, how the brain generates the perception of color, and how physics and physiology is exploited to print color. Instructors Susanne Klein and Carinna Parraman, University of the West of England  will be teaching this course live on 14 October.  Course registrants may also view the recording for at least 4 months afterwards.  Additional fees apply. FULL COURSE DESCRIPTION

Recorded Courses

Printing for Fabrication 2021 is offering a complete package of the recordings of the courses offered in 2020 for one price. Courses will be available to registrants immediately upon registration and for 4 months post-conference. Select the Registration Pass option to take advantage of this opportunity.

Instructor Interaction

Join the instructors for three group discussion sessions in the technical program to discuss their course content and related topics. Find full details in the program :

  • Deposition Technology I (New York | London | Tokyo)
    Group discussion on deposition technology featuring the following Short Course InstructorsJ. Frits Dijksman, Univ. of Twente; Inkjet Fluid Dynamics and Fundamentals
    Tim Phillips, Catenary Solutions/IMI Europe; Inkjet Ink Manufacturing
    Mark Bale, DoDxAct Ltd.; Practical Inkjet Ink Characterization
    Neil Chilton, PEL; Printed Electronics
  • Deposition Technology II (New York | London | Tokyo)
    Group discussion on deposition technology featuring the following Short Course Instructors James W. Stasiak, HP Labs; Intro to Digital Fabrication and Additive Manufacturing
    Paul McConville, Xerox Corp.; Direct-to-Object Printing
    Rich Baker, Integrity Industrial Ink Jet Integration LLC; Industrial Inkjet
    Chunghui Kuo, Eastman Kodak Company; Electrophotography and Machine learning (Print4Fab 2019)
  • System Integration (New York | London | Tokyo)
    Group discussion on system integration featuring the following Short Course Instructors Steven Abbott, Steven Abbott TCNF Ltd.; Optimizing Printed Adhesion: Surfaces; Formulations, Processes
    Matti Mantysalo, Tampere University; On-skin Electronics by Printing
    Ron Askeland, HP Emeritus Engineer with MBO Partners; Digital Textile Printing
    Enrico Sowade, Zschimmer & Schwarz TBC; Technology of Textile Printing
    Hitoshi Ujiie, Thomas Jefferson University; Digital Textile Printing

COURSES LISTED BY TOPIC

INK JET/JETTING TECHNOLOGY

PRACTICAL SURFACE TECHNOLOGY

TEXTILES

DIGITAL FABRICATION AND UNIQUE PRINTING APPLICATIONS

 

COURSES LISTED BY LEVEL

Functional – Core principles to get the job done

Introductory

Intermediate

Intermediate/Advanced

Advanced/Specialist

Course Descriptions

SC01: Inkjet Fluid Dynamics and Fundamentals - Part 1: Acoustics of Piezo Print Heads: The Physics of Drop Ejection

Instructor: J. Frits Dijksman, University of Twente
Level: Advanced/Specialist
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Appreciate the influence of pulse shape on pump performance.
  • Discern the basics of formulation of ink in terms of viscosity, density, wave speed of sound, and surface tension.
  • Understand the importance of the different design options for throttle, pump chamber, and nozzle.
  • Get a feeling the influence of applying under-pressure to prevent the print head from leaking during idling.
  • Understand the effect of enclosed air bubbles.
  • Obtain a basic idea on piezo performance and electrical time constant.

Intended Audience:  Scientists and engineers interested in designing and tuning piezo inkjet print heads.

Course Description:

Piezo driven droplet-on-demand inkjet print heads consist of a large number of parallel integrated piezo actuated valve less pumps. Each pump is a series connection of a throttle (the connection to the main supply channel), a pump chamber, and a nozzle (the connection to ambient). Such pumps are acoustic cavities filled with ink and upon actuation pressure waves are generated in the ink. At the nozzle these pressure waves are transferred into a time dependent fluid velocity and ultimately in one droplet or more droplets (satellites). The action of such a pump depends on the pulse shape (height, rise time, dwell time and fall time, or more complicated shapes), the driving frequency, the layout of the pump, in particular, the dimensions of throttle, pump chamber, and nozzle and ink properties like viscosity, density, the wave speed of sound and surface tension.

J. Frits Dijksman obtained his masters (1973) and PhD (1978) at the Technical University of Delft in The Netherlands. He worked with Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, for 32.5 years, mainly on inkjet printing, rheology of polymers, and medical devices. After his retirement he became part time professor in fluid dynamics at the University of Twente, The Netherlands. He is the author of a book Design of Piezo Inkjet Print Heads (Wiley-VCH 2018). He is now emeritus professor.

SC02: Inkjet Fluid Dynamics and Fundamentals - Part 2: Droplet Formation and Droplet Impact

Instructor: J. Frits Dijksman, University of Twente
Level: Advanced/Specialist
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Learn about the design rules of piezo driven inkjet print heads.
  • Discern the basics of formulation of ink in terms of viscosity (viscoelasticity), density and surface tension on droplet formation and impact.
  • Understand the importance of the different substrate properties on the spreading of a droplet on a substrate.
  • Obtain a basic idea about the effect of the time constants involved in flying, impacting, spreading, permeation, and drying.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers interested in designing and tuning piezo inkjet print heads.

Course Description:
Piezo driven droplet-on-demand inkjet print heads consist of a large number of parallel integrated piezo actuated valve less pumps. Each pump is a series connection of a throttle (the connection to the main supply channel), a pump chamber, and a nozzle (the connection to ambient). Such pumps are acoustic cavities filled with ink and upon actuation pressure waves are generated in the ink. At the nozzle these pressure waves are transferred into a time dependent fluid velocity and ultimately in one droplet or more droplets (satellites). Droplet formation and drop impact are highly dynamical phenomena where inertia effects compete with surface tension and viscosity. Droplet formation depends on the pulse shape (height, rise time, dwell time and fall time, or more complicated shapes), the driving frequency, the layout of the pump, in particular, the dimensions of throttle, pump chamber, and nozzle and ink properties like viscosity (viscoelasticity), density, and surface tension. Dot formation depends on also flight time, the properties of the substrate, such as surface tension and permeability and the drying characteristics.

J. Frits Dijksman obtained his masters (1973) and PhD (1978) at the Technical University of Delft in The Netherlands. He worked with Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, for 32.5 years, mainly on inkjet printing, rheology of polymers, and medical devices. After his retirement he became part time professor in fluid dynamics at the University of Twente, The Netherlands. He is the author of a book  Design of Piezo Inkjet Print Heads (Wiley-VCH 2018). He is now emeritus professor. 

SC03: Inkjet Ink Manufacturing

Instructor: Tim Phillips, Catenary Solutions/IMI Europe
Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Understand inkjet materials and ink formulations in the context of manufacturing.
  • Understand testing protocols, validation, and quality control for ink manufacturing.
  • Learn about ink plant layout and requirements including equipment.
  • Understand processes for scale up and manufacture.

Intended Audience: inkjet technologists wishing to understand more about ink manufacture; managers wishing to understand the potential for manufacturing ink versus sourcing externally.

Course Description:
This course is designed for those wishing to develop or source inkjet inks, or interested in commissioning their development and manufacture. It will help you understand the issues of development and testing, scale-up for manufacture and the manufacturing processes themselves, as well as covering the potential business models for an ink formulation or manufacturing company.

Tim Phillips has extensive experience in challenging inkjet integration projects, spending eight years working at Xennia Technology Ltd, the leading inkjet solutions company that was acquired by Sensient in 2015. This involved working with a wide range of companies developing technology for new applications including textiles, ceramics, packaging, décor, and functional material deposition for printed electronics and biomedical uses. Phillips founded Catenary Solutions in 2015 to bring this knowledge of digital solution development and marketing to a wider audience. He has also taught IMI Europe courses including the Inkjet Academy and Inkjet Ink Manufacturing & Digital Textile Printing.

Phillips graduated from the University of Cambridge with an MA Honors in natural sciences, and completed his PhD in liquid crystal physics and chemistry at the University of Bristol. He also has an Executive MBA from the University of Warwick.

SC04: Practical Inkjet Ink Characterization

Instructor: Mark Bale, DoDxAct Ltd.
Level: Introductory
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Learn about the demands of fluids for different applications.
  • Understand the tools typically applied to non-jetted characterization of fluid properties.
  • Apply laboratory testing to screen ink formulations and discriminate the good from bad.
  • See how to define laboratory-based jetting and printing experiments.
  • Discover from real-life examples how jetting can be used to predict and solve issues.
  • Apply the new learning to formulate their own testing methodologies.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers and R&D managers wanting to expand their understanding of the equipment and methods to reliably take inks from laboratory to the final application.

Course Description:
Inkjet technology is being applied to a wide array of printing and fabrication challenges that are demanding fluids (inks) which encompass diverse materials and chemistries. This course looks at the ways these inks can be tested in a laboratory environment for application suitability to industrial processes, up to and including conducting exhaustive jetting experiments with different print heads and the challenges typically faced. The focus is in the practical use, rather than full explanation of the theory, of each test or measurement system described.

Mark Bale is a physicist (Birmingham, UK, 2001) with more than 15 years in industrial inkjet R&D ranging from ink formulation to print/deposition process prototyping & optimization using jetting and printing methods. Application experience includes OLEDs and photovoltaics, decorative surfaces, wide format graphics, labels & packaging, textiles, and bio-printing. Passionate about print heads and their uses, he now runs his own technical consultancy, helping organizations of all sizes maximize the potential of their inkjet-based developments.

SC05: Optimizing Printed Adhesion: Surfaces, Formulations, Processes

Instructor: Steven Abbott, Steven Abbott TCNF Ltd.
Level: Functional – Core principles to get the job done
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Think clearly about their specific adhesion system.
  • Identify the weak link(s) in their chain of adhesion.
  • Work out which aspects of surface, formulation or process could/should be improved within the constraints of their overall process.
  • Decide on the best test for “adhesion” and decide on the best tests for ensuring long term adhesion.
  • Use the large range of free adhesion science apps from the author’s Practical Adhesion website.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers interested in solving day-to-day adhesion issues within the constraints imposed on them by their printing systems, the regulatory environment, and their customer needs.

Course Description:
There are lots of myths about getting printed formulations to stick. The core truth is that adhesion is a property of the system and get any part wrong – surface, formulation, process, and your other good work is undone. For surfaces there is over-emphasis on easy-to-measure contact angles and under-emphasis on de-wetting from a “contaminated” (i.e. printed!) surface. What happens across the interface, physical or chemical entanglement, is under-appreciated. Too often we try too hard, unaware that too much of a good thing is a bad thing. For processes, we need to work out how to get the most intermingling and entanglement at the interface, along with a low-stress cured/dried ink. Testing for adhesion is another area of unnecessary confusion – often the simplest tests are probably the best.  There is nothing difficult about any of this – yet decades of misdirected thinking about adhesion have made these core ideas too little known.

Steven Abbott was for many years a research director in the high performance coatings industry. For the past decade he has been an independent consultant, author, lecturer, and app writer trying his best to make usable science available to the formulation industry. His 2015 book Adhesion Science: Principles and Practice includes links to a set of adhesion apps to bring the science alive. His popular science book Sticking Together: the Science of Adhesives was published by the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2020 and features its own YouTube channel as a way to make the ideas easier to grasp.

SC06: Technology of Textile Printing: Inks, Fabrics, and Processes


Instructor: Ronald Askeland, retired HP Inc.
Level: Introductory
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Understand textile market applications.
  • Describe the different types of fabric composition and construction.
  • Gain an understanding the textile manufacturing process.
  • Describe the strengths and weaknesses of different classes of textile printing inks.
  • Learn about pre and post treatment processes, finishing, and functionalization of textiles.
  • Understand the ecological aspects of textile printing.

Intended Audience: those somewhat familiar with textile or inkjet printing technology who would like a better understanding of textiles, inks, and printing processes.

Course Description:
This course focuses on inks, fabrics, and processes for textile printing. The history of textile printing and textile market applications are reviewed. Fabric composition, construction, and the manufacturing processes are described. Reactive, acid, disperse, sublimation, and pigmented inks are compared and contrasted across fabric types. Pre and post treatment processes, finishing, and functionalization of textiles are described. Textile industry certifications are reviewed.

Ronald Askeland  is currently an HP Emeritus Engineer with MBO Partners in San Diego. He has more than 35 years of experience in inkjet technology and has been awarded more than 70 US patents on inkjet inks and printing systems. Askeland received his PhD in analytical chemistry from Colorado State University. Previously he worked as a system architect for HP Inc. in San Diego, CA (1984-2011 and 2016-2020) and Barcelona (2012-2015). Askeland is the author of Inkjet Print Engines in The Handbook of Digital Imaging (edited by Michael Kriss ©2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.).

SC07: Digital Textile Printing: Inkjet Printheads, Printers, and Industry 4.0

Instructor: Ronald Askeland, retired HP Inc.
Level: Introductory
Duration: 2 hours:

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Compare inkjet printheads and textile printers from major suppliers.
  • Learn about the differences between digital and analog textile printing.
  • Understand the advantages and barriers to adoption of digital textile printing.
  • Gain an understanding of the different types of fabric composition and construction.
  • Understand the role of Industry 4.0 and the IoT in the transformation to digital textile manufacturing.
  • Learn how COVID-19 has affected the textile industry.

Intended Audience: those somewhat familiar with textile or inkjet printing technology who would like a better understanding of inkjet’s role in the analog to digital conversion of textile printing.

Course Description:
This course focuses on inkjet printheads and printers for digital textile printing. The history of textile printing, textile market application, and growth rate projections are reviewed. Fabric composition and construction are described. Printing inks and finishing processes are compared across fabric types. Analog and digital textile printing processes are contrasted. Advantages of digital textile printing and barriers to adoption are explained. The role of Industry 4.0 and the IoT in the transformation to digital textile manufacturing are described. Inkjet printheads used in textile printers from major manufacturers are reviewed. Textile printers from Epson, Mimaki, HP Inc., EFI, Konica Minolta, Dover, and SPGPrints are scrutinized and compared. The latest digital textile printer introductions from ITMA 2019 are reviewed.

Ronald Askeland  is currently an HP Emeritus Engineer with MBO Partners in San Diego. He has more than 35 years of experience in inkjet technology and has been awarded more than 70 US patents on inkjet inks and printing systems. Askeland received his PhD in analytical chemistry from Colorado State University. Previously he worked as a system architect for HP Inc. in San Diego, CA (1984-2011 and 2016-2020) and Barcelona (2012-2015). Askeland is the author of Inkjet Print Engines in The Handbook of Digital Imaging (edited by Michael Kriss ©2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.).

SC08: An Introduction to Digital Fabrication and Additive Manufacturing: Methods, Materials, and Applications

Instructor: James W. Stasiak, HP Labs
Level: Introduction
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Develop an understanding of different digital fabrication and additive manufacturing methods and materials.
  • List and compare different applications that range from printed electronics to the life sciences.
  • Develop an understanding of the technology landscape, key players, and practitioners.
  • Evaluate the technological issues and challenges that will guide the evolution of digital fabrication and manufacturing applications and implementations.

Intended Audience: this is a survey course for engineers, scientists, and technical professionals who are interested in the history, current state, and future of digital fabrication and additive manufacturing technologies.

Course Description:
Over the last two decades, there has been a remarkable convergence of two disparate technologies: commercial and industrial digital printing and the extension of digital printing methods and materials to fabricate and manufacture physical objects. This convergence—a blending of traditional printing methods, advances in materials science, and manufacturing methods—has established a new technology domain which includes digital fabrication of physical objects in three-dimensions and various implementations of additive and digital manufacturing. 

The objective of this short course is to introduce the rapidly emerging science and technology of digital fabrication and manufacturing.  The course begins with an up-to-date overview of the remarkable advances in fabrication methods and strategies, printable and functional materials, and processes that have and are reshaping the way we imagine, design, fabricate, and manufacture technology. We have already seen how digital fabrication and additive manufacturing have enabled new commercial applications and products in domains spanning analog and digital electronics, MEMS and NEMS, sensing, computation, and communications. Digital fabrication is also transforming and challenging traditional manufacturing paradigms by enabling unprecedented customization and personalization of products.  Perhaps the most remarkable examples of the analog to digital fabrication transformation are in the Life Sciences where digital printing methods, “biological inks,” bio-inspired and bio-assisted processes promise to revolutionize medical procedures, drug discovery and delivery, and patient care and management. 

At the end of the short course,  we will be able to look back at the factors that influenced and enabled this revolution, understand the current state of the technology, identify challenges and opportunities, and imagine how the paradigm of “printing things”  will enable new technologies and services decades from now.

Jim Stasiak is a distinguished technologist and principal scientist in HP Labs Physical Sciences Division.  His current research is focused on the intersection of nanotechnology, digital printing, and fundamental materials science.  In a career spanning more than 40 years, he has made important contributions in the fields of condensed and soft matter physics, molecular electronics, nanotechnology, and is considered one of the pioneers who transformed digital inkjet technology into a new platform for fabricating and manufacturing using additive methods and functional materials.  In recognition of his contributions and leadership in a wide range of digital printing science and technology, he was the recipient of the 2012 IS&T Johann Gutenberg Prize. He has been an active member of IS&T for more than 25 years and has held various committee and board positions including Vice President (2014-2018).  Most notably, he was instrumental in organizing and launching the inaugural Digital Fabrication Conference in 2005, serving as the conference General Chair in 2005, 2006, and 2017, and as the Executive Program Chair in 2015 and 2016. He is a named inventor on more than 70 issued US patents and is the author of numerous scientific and technical articles and book chapters, and is regularly invited to present focal, keynote, and plenary papers at US and international conferences and workshops. In 2019 he was elected IS&T Fellow.

SC10: DTO – Direct to Object Inkjet System Integration

Instructor: Paul McConville, Xerox Corp. 
Level: Intermediate
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
The course enables an attendee to:

  • Appreciate the challenges in DTO inkjet system integration.
  • Understand how printhead characteristics drive performance in DTO printing.
  • Understand some of the rules involved in image processing.
  • Understand the LED UV source requirements for DTO printing.
  • Understand the ink – substrate and ink –interactions to achieve good image quality and image durability.
  • Communicate inkjet system level requirements for DTO applications.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, and integrators interested in the challenges faced in DTO printing.

Course Description:
Direct to Object, DTO, inkjet system integration is the combination of inkjet technology plus large varying printhead to substrate gap printing conditions. Organized by the elements common in any inkjet system, we will identify and expound on the key areas of focus. For the purpose of this short course, the elements within an inkjet system are jetting quality, drop placement, image processing, and print process. The system output performance is defined by productivity, image quality, and image durability. The course primarily focuses on multi-pass printing but single pass printing challenges are highlighted along the way. In addition, the focus will be on LED UV curable inks.

Paul McConville is a principal scientist in the Xerox Corporation’s Advanced Technology Group (ATG) responsible for inkjet system integration technology development including cut-sheet production Baltoro, Liquid Metal Jetting, and several packaging initiatives. McConville received his PhD in experimental physics from Michigan State University (1995) and is the recipient of the Sherwood K. Haynes Outstanding Graduate award. While at Xerox, he has received several awards including the Anne Mulcahy Inventor Award and currently has more than 135 granted patents.

SC11: On-skin Electronics by Printing

Instructor: Matti Mantysalo, Tampere University
Level: Introductory/ Introductory
Duration: 2 hours

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Have an overview of on-skin electronics.
  • Understand the main challenges related to on-skin electronics.
  • Understand limitations and advantages of printing technologies to fabricate on-skin sensors.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers interested in wearable electronics, stretchable electronics, and bio-measurement applications.

Course Description:
Current body-worn sensors and electronic devices are based on conventional rigid and flexible electronics, which leads to bulky and uncomfortable devices. To reach the full potential of on-skin sensors, the technology must become soft, lightweight, thin, stretchable, and conformable to the body. The presented approach is based on low-cost printing processes enabling the wider exploitation of the results, i.e. affordable disposable sensors and e-textiles. Printing electronic components like antennas, interconnects, electrodes, temperature sensors, and pressure sensors on low-cost soft and biocompatible substrates, like thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), enables continuous (24/7) monitoring. This presentation will focus on utilization of inkjet and screen-printing technologies in fabrication of on-skin sensors.

Matti Mäntysalo is a professor in electrical engineering at Tampere University. He has published more than 100 papers and 2 book chapters. He has served as an external expert in IEC TC119 printed electronics, technical committee member in IEEE ESTC and IEEE IFETC, and as spokesperson of Organic Electronic Association Hybrid System working group, and the chair of IEEE CMPT Finnish chapter. His research interests include printed electronics materials, fabrication processes, stretchable electronics, sensors, and the integration of printed electronics with silicon-based technology (hybrid systems). He was awarded by Nokia Research Center for the first inkjet printed GSM baseband integration.

SC12: Color Fever: The Printing of an Illusion

Instructors: Susanne Klein and Carinna Parraman, University of the West of England
Level: Introductory
Duration: 2 hours
Course Time:
     New York: 14 October 10:00 – 12:15
     London: 14 October 15:00 – 17:15
     Tokyo: 15 October: 23:00- 01:15

Benefits:
This course enables an attendee to:

  • Understand the physics of color and how color is generated by the interaction of electromagnetic waves with the shells of atoms. 
  • Understand the physiology of color and appreciate that there is no objective color but only a subjective color perception by understanding the interaction of the eye and brain with electromagnetic waves. 
  • Explore the different process color systems and their physical and physiological origins.  
  • Learn what determines the difference between what we see and what we print, and how greyscale shifts color.
  • Discuss structural color: Color without pigments and how it can be printed. 

Intended Audience: students and professionals in the field of printing who want to understand color in more detail. 

Course Description:
What we perceive as color is a small part of the electromagnetic spectrum seen only when it interacts with matter. This course discusses how color is generated when electromagnetic waves interact with matter, how the brain generates the perception of color, and how physics and physiology is exploited to print color. The aim of the course is to explain the scientific base of color printing and to show that CMYK printing is only one of many systems available to print color.

Susanne Klein is an EPSRC manufacturing fellow and associate professor at the Centre for Fine Print Research. A physicist by training, after studying Germany she came as a Royal Society Research fellow to the University of Bristol where she worked on 19th century optics. She worked at Hewlett Packard Labs and specialized in liquid crystal display technology, new materials for 3D printing, and optical cryptography. Her research interests now are 19th century photomechanical processes and their 21st century incarnations, especially Woodburytype, photolithography, and Lippmann photography. 

Carinna Parraman is professor of Colour, Design and Print, and Director of the Centre for Print Research, University of the West of England, UK. She leads a cross-disciplinary research team comprising scientists and technologists, designers, artists, and researchers. She is leader of Expanding Excellence in England (E3), exploring the future of printing and fabrication, alongside traditional methods of making.  

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