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IMPORTANT DATES

Author Deadlines
Call for Paper Submissions
» Journal-first (JIST or JPI) 15 Feb
» Conference EXTENDED
11 April
Acceptance Notification
» Journal-first (JIST or JPI) by 21 April
» Conference 9 May
Final Manuscripts Due
» Journal-first (JIST or JPI) 10 May
» Conference 23 May

Program Deadlines
Registration Opens Early May
Early Registration Ends 8 June
Attending In-person Reg Ends 22 June
Summer School 6 July
Technical Sessions 7-8 July

   

Partners


LIM 2022 Program

Join us in London for a full day of display science courses—LIM 2022 Summer School—followed by two exciting days of technical talks and networking opportunities. In-person space is limited for both events. Online is an option for the Technical Program, but not the Summer School.

AT-A-GLANCE

6 July: LIM 2022 Summer School
7-8 July: LIM Technical Program (below)
 

LIM Technical Program

Thursday 7 July 2022
Opening Keynote
10:00 – 11:10 London
Foundations of Perception Engineering, Steven M. LaValle, Center for Ubiquitous Computing, University of Oulu (Finland)
Abstract: Virtual reality (VR) technology has enormous potential to transform society by creating perceptual illusions that can uniquely enhance education, collaborative design, health care, and social interaction, all from a distance. Further benefits include highly immersive computer interfaces, data visualization, and storytelling.  We propose in our research that VR and related fields can be reframed as perception engineering, in which the object being engineered is the perceptual illusion itself, and the physical devices that achieve it are auxiliary.
BREAK
Perceptual metrics and optimization
11:40 – 12:50 London
Focal Talk: Breaking the Limits of Display and Fabrication using Perception-aware Optimizations, Piotr Didyk, Università della Svizzera italiana (Switzerland)
Abstract: Novel display devices and fabrication techniques enable highly tangible ways for creating, experiencing, and interacting with digital content. The capabilities offered by new output devices, such as virtual and augmented reality head-mounted displays and new multi-material 3D printers, make them real game-changers in many fields. At the same time, the new possibilities offered by these devices impose many challenges for content creation techniques regarding quality and computational efficiency. This talk demonstrates how studying and modeling human perception enable new computation techniques that address these problems. The examples include methods for optimizing visual content for novel display devices that focus on perceived quality and new computational fabrication techniques for manufacturing objects that look and feel like real ones. The talk also highlights the possibilities of combining new perceptual insights with hardware advancements to improve human task performance beyond the human capabilities in the natural world.
The Effect of Peripheral Contrast Sensitivity Functions on the Performance of the Foveated Wavelet Image Quality Index, Aliakabar Bozorgian, Marius Pedersen, and Jean Baptiste D. Thomas, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)
Enforcing Histogram Matching for Image Enhancement, Aamir Mustafa¹, Hongjie You², and Rafal Mantiuk¹, ¹University of Cambridge (UK) and ²Huawei Technologies Duesseldorf (Germany)
LUNCH BREAK
Perceptual and automotive displays
14:00 – 15:10 London
Focal Talk: Perceptual Displays Today and Tomorrow—Evangelizing, Productization, & Measuring, Tara Akhavan, Faurecia IRYStec Inc. (Canada)
Abstract: The evolution of displays in various industries such as consumer electronics, aerospace, automotive, gaming, and digital signage has been a key factor to engage and satisfy customers. This talk highlights the automotive market as one of the fastest-growing display markets, but all discussed matters are applicable to other display verticals. Perceptual and immersive display user experiences are attracting more manufacturers these days to build products matching the end user's expectation of their interaction with displays such as perfect visibility in all conditions, personalization, less eye discomfort, seamless interaction—in other words, displays that "mimic real world" experience. This talk focuses how to evangelize the benefits of perceptual displays, the challenges of such evangelism, productization of it, and, most importantly, measuring the performance of perceptual displays in a comparable way to traditional displays.
Does External Illumination Affect Color Acceptability Threshold for a Mixed Display Technology Cockpit?, Pooshpanjan Roy Biswas, Renault (France)
Viewers Prefer Different Display Colors in Different Illuminations: A Questionnaire Study, Yunyang Shi and Anya Hurlbert, Newcastle University (UK)
2-Minute Interactive Paper Previews Followed by the Interactive Paper Poster Session
15:10 – 16:30 London
The Art and Science of Displaying Visual Space, Robert Pepperell and Alistair Burleigh, Cardiff Metropolitan University (UK)
Effect of Bit-depth in Stochastic Gradient Descent Performance for Phase-only Computer-generated Holography Displays, Andrew C. Kadis, Jinze Sha, Fan Yang, Benjamin Wetherfield, Youchao Wang, and Timothy Wilkinson, University of Cambridge (UK)
Displays and HDR
16:30 – 17:30 London
Invited Talk: High Dynamic Range Imaging—Technologies, Applications, and Perceptual Considerations, Timo Kunkel, Dolby Laboratories (US)
Abstract: High-Dynamic Range imaging, better known by its acronym “HDR”, has established itself as a foundational component when looking at the aspects defining today’s image fidelity. HDR technology is widely supported by millions of devices from cameras to post-production tools, deployment systems, and displays and is embraced by content creators and providers. HDR imaging is based on several key concepts that facilitate perceptually meaningful, artistically compelling, and technologically effective delivery of movies, TV shows, and video games that are more immersive and realistic than previously possible. This lecture provides an overview of these concepts enabling today’s HDR ecosystem, including perceptual and technological aspects, as well as industry standards, formats, and approaches.
Friday 8 July 2022
Holographic, tensor and wide colour gamut displays
09:30 – 10:50 London
CONFERENCE WELCOME
Focal Talk: Perceptually Guided Computer-generated Holography, Kaan Akşit, University College London (UK)
Abstract: Inventing immersive displays that can attain realism in visuals is a long standing quest in the optics, graphics, and perception fields. As holographic displays can simultaneously address various depth levels, experts from industry and academia often pitch these holographic displays as the next-generation display technology that could lead to such realism in visuals. However, holographic displays demand high computational complexity in image generation pipelines and suffer from visual quality-related issues. Hence, this talk will describe our research efforts to combine visual perception related findings with Computer-Generated Holography (CGH) to achieve realism in visuals and derive CGH pipelines that can run at interactive rates (above 30 Hz). Specifically, I explain how holographic displays could effectively generate three-dimensional images with good image quality and how these images could be generated to match the needs of human visual perception in resolution and statistics. Furthermore, I demonstrate our CGH methods running at interactive rates with the help of learning strategies. As a result, we provide a glimpse into a potential future where CGH helps replace two-dimensional images generated on today's displays with authentic three-dimensional visuals that are perceptually realistic.
Towards Non-Lambertian Scenes for Tensor Displays, Eline Soetens, Armand Losfeld, Daniele Bonatto, Sarah Fachada, Laurie Van Bogaert, Gauthier Lafruit, and Mehrdad Teratani, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)
Probing Perceptual Phenomena for Color Management, Trevor Canham, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Spain), and Marcelo Bertalmío, Consejo Superior De Investigaciones Cientificas - CSIC (Spain)
BREAK
VR/AR and volumetric content
11:20 – 12:30 London
Focal Talk: Volumetric Video Content Creation for Immersive XR Experiences, Aljosa Smolic, Hochschule Luzern and Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)
Abstract: Volumetric video (VV) is an emergent digital media that enables novel forms of interaction and immersion within eXtended Reality (XR) applications. VV supports 3D representation of real-world scenes and objects to be visualized from any viewpoint or viewing direction; an interaction paradigm that is commonly seen in computer games. This allows for instance to bring real people into XR. Based on this innovative media format, it is possible to design new forms of immersive and interactive experiences that can be visualized via head-mounted displays (HMDs) in virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR). The talk highlights technology for VV content creation developed by the V-SENSE lab and the startup company Volograms. It will further showcase a variety of creative experiments applying VV for immersive storytelling in XR.
A Hybrid Multi-view and Eye-tracked Transparent Autostereoscopic Display for Augmented Reality, Charlie Schlick¹, Thomas Crespel¹, and Xavier Granier², and Patrick Reuter¹; ¹University of Bordeaux, Inria Bordeaux Sud-Ouest and ²Institut d'Optique Graduate School (France)
Augmented Reality for Automatically Generating Robust Manufacturing and Maintenance Logs, Tim Schoonbeek¹, Pierluigi Frisco², Hans Onvlee², P. H. N. de With¹, and Fons van der Sommen¹, ¹Eindhoven University of Technology and ²ASML (the Netherlands)
LUNCH BREAK
Colour
14:00 – 15:10 London
Focal Talk: Point and Line to Surface: The Geometric Elements of Display Color Modeling, Hao Xie, Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology (US)
Abstract: Color appearance is multidimensional and color space has been a useful geometric representation for display modeling and optimization. However, the three fundamental attributes of color, i.e., brightness, saturation, and hue, have not found their singly corresponding physical correlates. Changes along one physical dimension interfere with other color attributes, which has been a deficiency of the existing color spaces, particularly prevalent for high-dynamic-range and wide-color-gamut displays. This talk describes how to develop independent color scales for each attribute. Based on both psychophysical experiments and computational modeling, the surfaces/lines of equal brightness/saturation, as well as the boundaries between surface versus illumination color modes, have been characterized. Furthermore, the independent relations between those new scales have been quantitatively evaluated. Those results promise a new color representation that is more intuitive and efficient for color controls in displays.
Comparison of Regression Methods and Neural Networks for Colour Correction, Abdullah Kucuk¹, Graham Finlayson¹, Rafal Mantiuk², and Maliha Ashraf³; ¹University of East Anglia, ²University of Cambridge, and ³University of Liverpool (UK)
Colour Difference Formula for Photopic and Mesopic Vision Incorporating Cone and Rod Responses, Maliha Ashraf¹, Rafal Mantiuk², Graham Finlayson³, Abdullah Kucuk³, and Sophie Wuerger¹; ¹University of Liverpool, ²University of Cambridge, and ³University of East Anglia (UK)
BREAK
Closing Keynote
15:40 – 16:50 London
The Display of Perception and the Perception of Displays, Robert Pepperell, Fovotec Ltd/Cardiff Metropolitan University (UK)
Abstract: In this talk I consider the problem of how to display visual space naturalistically in image media. We can think of visual space—the 3D space we experience—as a kind of internal display in the head that shows us the world outside. Artists and technologists have long been interested in how to emulate visual space on external displays such as paintings, photographs, and electronic screens in a way that looks as natural as possible. A long-standing solution is linear perspective projection, which is currently used in imaging technologies from cameras to 3D renderers. Linear perspective has many advantages but also some significant limitations. Over the centuries alternative techniques have been developed for creating more naturalistic image media. I discuss the problem of how best to emulate the internal display on an external display, some of the historical solutions to the problem, and introduce a new solution. This is a form of nonlinear 3D rendering modelled on the structure of human visual space. I conclude that nonlinear human-centred approaches to 3D imaging can create more naturalistic image media than methods based on techniques such as linear perspective.

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