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 IMPORTANT DATES
 Final Manuscripts Due
28 Sept 2020
 Early Registration Deadline 15 Oct 2020
 Short Courses Begin
4 Nov 2020
 Technical Program Begins 16 Nov 2020
 Workshop
19 Nov 2020

 EXPAND YOUR KNOWLEDGE
On this page

  • CIC28 Short Courses take place November 4-6 and 9-13.
  • CIC28 Workshops take place November 19.
  • Courses and workshops will be recorded, so may be taken live or viewed at your convenience, as often as you like. Recordings will be online until 15 March 2021.
  • You may take class(es) and workshop(s) even if you do not plan to attend the technical conference.
  • Workshops are free with CIC technical program registration. Short Courses are not included in a basic registration, but are included in the All-access passes.
  • The Short Course Passport allows you to take all the courses live and/or via recording. Option available with and without SC01.
  • The CIC28 Conference Portal is open, you access the live courses there.

COURSE LISTING BY TOPIC

See chart below for times and course descriptions.

Color Theory and Modeling
    SC07 Fundamentals of Psychophysics (J. Ferwerda)
    SC09 Characterizing Surface Appearance (J. Ferwerda)
    SC15 Individual Differences in Color Matching and Appearance (M. Fairchild)
    SC02 Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance (G. Sharma)

Color Imaging
    SC01 Color and Imaging (G. Sharma)
    SC04 Fundamentals of Spectral Measurements for Color Science (D. Wyble)
    • SC14 High Dynamic Range Imaging: Improvements and Limits after more than 20 Years of Research (A. Rizzi and J. McCann)
    • SC12 Color Imaging Challenges with Compact Camera Optics (K. Matherson)
    • SC06 Color and the Camera Imaging Pipeline (M. Brown)

Color Display
    • SC05 The Art of Making Better Pixels: High Dynamic Range Display Concepts and Technologies (T. Kunkel)
    • SC11 Color Essentials in LED Lighting Systems (M. Murdoch)

Color Processing
    • SC10 Solving Color Problems using Vector Space Arithmetic(M. Vrhel)
    • SC13 Spatial Color Perception and Image Processing (E. Provenzi)
    SC08 Using the New Colour Management Technology, iccMAX: Architecture and Practical Applications (P. Green)
    SC03 Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice (D. Wueller and E. Walowit)

WORKSHOPS

See chart below for times and workshop descriptions.

    Workshop 1: Skin Characteristics Measurement, Perception, and Applications (Convener: K. Xiao)
    Workshop 2: Color in the Arts (Convener: C. Parraman)
    Workshop 3: Open Table on the Future of Color Research (Convener: J. Vazquez-Corral)
    Workshop 4: VR/AR/MR Appearance and Perception (Convener: M. Wei)

 SHORT COURSE LISTING by LENGTH, LEVEL, and TIME

PLEASE NOTE: All courses will be taught live. The live class will be recorded and available for viewing as many times as you like until March 15, 2021. See chart below for course details and descriptions. After each class, please join the instructor and other students for a Zoom Room discussion. To help planning depending on where you are located in the world, course times are shown in three time zones.

8 HOUR COURSE
New York Paris Tokyo INTRODUCTORY

Wed. Nov. 4
10:00 - 15:00
and
Thur. Nov. 5
10:00 - 15:00

Wed. Nov. 4
16:00 - 21:00
and
Thur. Nov. 5
16:00 - 21:00

Thur. Nov. 5
00:00 - 05:00
and
Fri. Nov. 6
00:00 - 05:00

SC01
Color and Imaging
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Course Description
(8 hours over 2 days)
4 HOUR COURSES
New York Paris Tokyo INTRODUCTORY

Mon. Nov. 9
10:00 - 15:00

Mon. Nov. 9
16:00 - 21:00

Tue. Nov. 10
00:00 - 05:00

SC02
Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Course Description

    INTERMEDIATE

Tues. Nov. 10
10:00 - 15:00

Tues. Nov. 10
16:00 - 21:00

Wed. Nov. 11
00:00 - 05:00

SC03
Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Dietmar Wueller, Image Engineering GmbH & Co. KG and Eric Walowit, consultant
Course Description
2 HOUR COURSES
New York Paris Tokyo INTRODUCTORY

Wed. Nov. 11
10:00 - 12:15

Wed. Nov. 11
16:00 - 18:15

Thur. Nov. 12
00:00 - 02:15

SC04
Fundamentals of Spectral Measurements for Color Science
Instructor: David Wyble, Avian Rochester, LLC
Course Description

Thur. Nov. 12
18:30 - 20:45

Fri. Nov. 13
00:30 - 02:45

Fri. Nov. 13
08:30 - 10:45

SC05
The Art of Making Better Pixels: High Dynamic Range Display Concepts and Technologies
Instructor: Timo Kunkel, Dolby Laboratories, LLC
Course Description
New York Paris Tokyo INTERMEDIATE

Wed. Nov. 4
18:30 - 20:45

Thur. Nov. 5
00:30 - 02:45

Thur. Nov. 5
08:30 - 10:45

SC06
Color and the Camera Imaging Pipeline
Instructor: Michael Brown, York University
Course Description

Thur. Nov. 5
18:30 - 20:45

Fri. Nov. 6
00:30 - 02:45

Fri. Nov. 6
08:30 - 10:45

SC07
Fundamentals of Psychophysics
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology
Course Description

Fri. Nov. 6
10:00 - 12:15

Fri. Nov. 6
16:00 - 18:15

Sat. Nov. 7
00:00 - 02:15

SC08
Using the New Colour Management Technology, iccMAX: Architecture and Practical Applications
Instructor: Philip Green, NTNU
Course Description

Mon. Nov. 9
18:30 - 20:45

Tues. Nov. 10
00:30 - 02:45

Tues. Nov. 10
08:30 - 10:45

SC09
Characterizing Surface Appearance
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda
Course Description

Tues. Nov. 10
18:30 - 20:45

Wed. Nov. 11
00:30 - 02:45

Wed. Nov. 11
08:30 - 10:45

SC10
Solving Color Problems using Vector Space Arithmetic
Instructor: Michael Vrhel, Artifex Software, Inc.
Course Description

Wed. Nov. 11
12:45 - 15:00

Wed. Nov. 11
18:45 - 21:00

Thur. Nov. 12
02:45 - 05:00

SC11
Color Essentials in LED Lighting Systems
Instructor: Michael Murdoch, Rochester Institute of Technology
Course Description

Wed. Nov. 11
18:30 - 20:45

Thur. Nov. 12
00:30 - 02:45

Thur. Nov. 12
08:30 - 10:45

SC12
Color Imaging Challenges with Compact Camera Optics
Instructor: Kevin Matherson, Microsoft Corporation
Course Description

Thur. Nov. 12
10:00 - 12:15

Thur. Nov. 12
16:00 - 18:15

Fri. Nov. 13
00:00 - 02:15

SC13
Spatial Color Perception and Image Processing
Instructor: Edoardo Provenzi, Université de Bordeaux
Course Description

Thur. Nov. 12
12:45 - 15:00

Thur. Nov. 12
18:45 - 21:00

Fri. Nov. 13
02:45 - 05:00

SC14
High Dynamic Range Imaging: Improvements and Limits after more than 20 Years of Research
Instructor: Alessandro Rizzi, Università Degli Studi di Milano and John McCann, McCann Imaging
Course Description
New York Paris Tokyo ADVANCED

Fri. Nov. 13
10:00 - 12:15

Fri. Nov. 13
16:00 - 18:15

Sat.. Nov. 14
00:00 - 02:15

SC15
Individual Differences in Color Matching and Appearance
Instructor: Mark Fairchild, Rochester Institute of Technology
Course Description

 WORKSHOPS BY TIME

PLEASE NOTE: All workshops will be conducted live. The live workshop will be recorded and available for viewing as many times as you like until March 15, 2021. See chart below for workshop details and descriptions. To help planning depending on where you are located in the world, workshop times are shown in three time zones.

 
New York Paris Tokyo DESCRIPTION

Thurs. Nov. 19
04:00 - 06:30

Thurs. Nov. 19
10:00 - 12:30

Thurs. Nov. 19
18:00 - 20:30

WORKSHOP 1
SKIN CHARACTERISTICS MEASUREMENT, PERCEPTION, AND APPLICATIONS
Convener: Kaida Xiao, University of Leeds (UK)
Speakers: Ming Ronnier Luo, Zhejiang University (China); Nobutoshi Ojima, Kao Corporation (Japan); Kumiko Kikuchi, Shiseido Co. Ltd. (Japan); and Yan Lu, University of Leeds (UK)
Description:

There has recently been a resurgence in interest in skin characteristics, driven by a number of different technologies and application areas where accurate skin measurement and reproduction are key factors. Application areas include the diagnosis of cutaneous diseases, segmentation for face detection and recognition, reproduction for the graphic arts, and matching for body and maxillofacial soft tissue prostheses. For such applications, a comprehensive knowledge of the range of skin shades that represent individuals, an understanding of how skin characteristics varies, and how people perceive these differences in a wide range of viewing conditions are strongly desired. The goal of this workshop is to bring together practitioners and academics from a range of disciplines to explore the outstanding issues in the measurement, reproduction, and perception of skin, with a particular emphasis on skin imaging.

Thurs. Nov. 19
11:00 - 13:30

Thurs. Nov. 19
17:00 - 19:30

Fri. Nov. 20
01:00 - 03:30

WORKSHOP 2
COLOR IN THE ARTS
Convener: Carinna Parraman, Centre for Fine Print Research, University of the West of England (UK)
Speakers: Susanne Klein, CFPR (UK), Abigail Trujillo, Centre for Fine Print Research (UK), Angela Thwaites, Becky Goody, CFPR (UK)<
Description:

Color is fundamental across sciences, theology, languages, and technology, and for many centuries, has been inextricably bound to art and design. As symbolic, therapeutic, synaesthetic or surreal, it has the power to give pleasure or discomfort. As a sensation, Josef Albers described the properties and relationship of color in art, that 'deceives continually'.

Color has drawn artists and scientists into fierce debates. Newton's experiments on the phenomena of light and exploration on pigments were not without adversaries. William Blake regarded Newton as lacking in imagination. The poet John Keats decried Newton had 'destroyed the poetry of the rainbow by reducing it to a prism'.

Artists for centuries explored and captured the appearance of materials through pigments and drawing. Sometimes creating the most lifelike images that one could ask, is this is a photo or a painting? Color is reflected and transmitted by its medium - as pigments, textiles, light and film, as structural color that appears in glass and pottery, iridescent surfaces such as feathers and beetles, or inter-reflections between colored objects and surfaces.

This workshop calls upon artists, designers, and historians to discuss the complexities of color in the arts.

Now You See It, and Now You Don't: Illusive Colour, Susanne Klein
Colour, as beauty, lies in the eye of the beholder. In 1861, based on the RGB model of colour perception, James Clerk Maxwell produced the first colour photographs by exposing black and white film through red, green and blue filters, thus recording intensity patterns, but not colour itself. Going back to Maxwell's recording method and printing the result as lithography or Woodburytype in cyan, magenta and yellow or with red, green, blue speciality pigments allows to explore 'true' colour and empowers the artist to intervene at all stages of the process. Knowing that three black and white negatives are being created rather than a colour one changes the approach as well as the result. The recording process is slow. The filters have to be changed between each image. Control, direction and choices made in advance of taking the picture change the dynamic between the photographer the scene or the sitter. Time is traced by coloured ghosts in the final print. Striving for a defined set of process colours at the printing stage rather than manipulating colours in film processing allows the photographer to consciously engage with the subject and visualise other senses, such as smell, noise and mood.
Dr. Susanne Klein is EPSRC Manufacturing Fellow and associate professor at the CFPR. She is a physicist by training and has worked in the UK for the last 25 years. During her last two years with Hewlett Packard, she worked in optical cryptography. She joined CFPR in 2018, and is exploring how photographic and photomechanical processes invented in the 19th century can be transformed into 21st century technologies, for both artists and industry.

Colour in the History of the Eye, Abigail Trujillo
Colour cannot be separated from the human experience, neither the significance of colours can be understood without the framework of a cultural worldview. Early uses and representations of colours in the arts manifest the technological development of an era, as well as an approach to the nature of vision, human values, perception and consciousness. In this presentation, I will review ancient polychromy and some of the great moments of colour in the history of painting. I will address historical examples where colours became the kernel of cultural order, the symbols of life, death, power, virtue and we will seek for an insight on the mysteries of the aura drawing upon our modern understanding of light.

Abigail Trujillo is a research associate at the Centre for Fine Print Research and member of the EU ApPEARS Network. Abigail has a background in Physics and Art history, specialising in optics, spectroscopy and ceramics. She is investigating hybrid analogue-digital printing applications in the fields of art and heritage.

Adventures in Colour and Appearance, Carinna Parraman
This presentation seeks to explore how artists have observed the illumination and colour appearance of objects and scenes, and by using pigments to reproduce the appearance. One of the first paintings to draw me into an investigation of colour phenomena was a painting of Henri Matisse by André Derain (1905) in the Tate Gallery, London. Matisse’s portrait is rendered as a full polychromic painting, one side of his face is painted blue, and the other side of his face is yellow. I was interested in this painting because it represented to me a range of open issues around the subject of colour and illumination; how appearance is captured and reproduced, and our capacity as humans to see and process the world differently. This presentation will draw upon artists who have used colour in art in different ways.

Dr. Carinna Parraman is professor of Colour, Design and Print, and Director of the CFPR. She leads a cross-disciplinary research team comprising scientists and technologists, designers, artists, and researchers. She is leader of Expanding Excellence in England (E3), exploring the future of printing and fabrication, alongside traditional methods of making. She is a member of the technical committee for Color Imaging.

The Material is the Colour, Angela Thwaites
Like the screens we use every day, we are steeped in colour. Even black and white as seen through a screen is made up of a multitude of colours from violet to burnt yellow passing through grey, blue, sepia brown, resulting in an overall impression that we accept as a black and white image. The medium that enables us to see this and to carry out our 21st-century lives is glass. Long before we were all working and living through screens, I began to explore glass as an expressive sculptural material. Glass drew my interest away from ceramics in the way screens capture and hold our attention now. Light, transparency/translucency, abstraction of mass and scale and of course colour are qualities which stole my imagination as an artist and fascinate me still: colour for embodying form and space, symbolism and language, for storytelling and humour, for sensitivity and for power. Whereas other materials take on a patina or a surface layer of colour, glass is the colour.

Dr Angela Thwaites is an authority on glass craft practice and has written one of the leading books on the subject of mould making for glass casting. Angela was awarded her PhD from the University of Sunderland researching the combination of 3D printing with glass casting.


Colour and Textiles, Becky Gooby
The British Interwar period was a time of significant textile technological modernisation, change and innovation, with the advent of cheap, chemical colourants, synthetic fabrics and the emergence of silk screen textile printing. Britain's housebuilding boom meant that homeownership and interior decoration were available to the masses. The colour palettes selected from my archival research, incorporating smoky, dark colours, neutrals and earth colours, have proven to be the hardest to reproduce in digital textile printing (DTP) accurately. These palettes provide a challenge to test, document and trail DTP methods, which aim to aid colour assurance and accuracy for this emerging technology. This presentation offers a comparative case study and asks what lessons can be learned and incorporated into best practice for developing DTP technology today.

Becky Gooby is a researcher at the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR), University of the West of England (UWE). Her research considers how designers can ensure colour assurance when digitally printing on a range of fabrics. Her research interests include digital textile printing, practice-as-research, color management, digital color and interwar design history.

Thurs. Nov. 19
11:00 - 13:30

Thurs. Nov. 19
17:00 - 19:30

Fri. Nov. 20
01:00 - 03:30

WORKSHOP 3
OPEN TABLE ON THE FUTURE OF COLOR RESEARCH
Convener: Javier Vazquez-Corral, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Spain)
Speakers: Michael Brown, York University (UK); Jan Morovic, HP Inc. (UK); and Philip Urban, Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD (Germany)
Description:

Color imaging received a lot of attention during the rise of the smartphone era—especially due to its associated cameras—and this is still the case, as different manufacturers use the quality of the photos obtained to publicize a new phone. The fight between these companies has garnered lots of attention in some specific research areas, such as image quality and image fusion. Currently, it seems we are again at a turning point with the advent of new technologies such as AR/VR, 3D printing, wide color gamut, and HDR, to name just a few. During this round table, world-leading color scientists will debate on these topics, looking specifically at where we have come from in color imaging research and where we are heading.

Thurs. Nov. 19
19:00 - 21:30

Fri. Nov. 20
01:00 - 03:30

Fri. Nov. 20
09:00 - 11:30

WORKSHOP 4
VR/AR/MR APPEARANCE AND PERCEPTION
Convener: Minchen (Tommy) Wei, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)
Speakers: Michael Murdoch, Rochester Institute of Technology (US); Kynthia Chamilothori, TU/e (Netherlands); and Romain Bachy and Trisha Lian, Facebook (US)
Description:

With the development of various new imaging technologies, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality (MR) are becoming more and more popular for use in various industries for different purposes. Little research, however, has been carried out to investigate issues related to appearance and perception when using these new technologies. To facilitate the development and to improve the user experience, a comprehensive understanding about how the human visual system responds to stimuli and scenes produced by VR/AR/MR is important. In this workshop, speakers present the latest research and have an open discussion about outstanding issues that need scientific research.

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