Important Dates

 Call for Papers Proposals March 1, 2017
 Call for Workshops March 1, 2017
 Manuscripts Due July 11 2017
 Early Registration Ends
August 13, 2017
 Early Hotel Reservations
August 13, 2017
 Conference Starts September 11, 2017

Sponsors


IS&T Sustaining Corporate Members







CIC 25

September 11-15, 2017
Lillehammer, Norway


Twenty-fifth Color and Imaging Conference

Color Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, and Applications


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Short Course Fees
Separate Conference Registration Fee is Required

 If you register by August 13  after August 13
 2-hour Member  $ 165
 $ 215
 2-hour Non-member  $ 200  $ 250
 2-hour Student  $ 65  $ 115
     
 4-hour Member  $ 270  $ 320
 4-hour Non-member  $ 315  $ 365
 4-hour Student  $ 95  $ 145
     
 8-hour Member  $ 480  $ 530
 8-hour Non-member  $ 570  $ 620
 8-hour Student  $ 195  $ 245
 IS&T reserves the right to cancel classes in the event of insufficient advance registration. Please register early.

 

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MONDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

M1: Color, Vision, and Basic Colorimetry New Instructor

8:30 – 17:45 (8 hours)
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of color perception, measurement, and representation. The course begins with the psychophysics of color, relating physical descriptions of color, through stages of the human visual system, to perceptual attributes of hue, saturation, and lightness. The anatomy and physiology of the visual system stages are briefly described. From there, basic colorimetric and perceptual color representations are developed, with a particular focus on CIE standards such as the CIEXYZ tristimulus space and the CIELAB and CIELUV perceptually uniform color spaces. Chromaticity representations are discussed as convenient 2D visualization tools.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe the basic findings from color matching experiments and the concept of trichromacy.
  • Transform between commonly used color space representations.
  • Describe how these color representations relate to the stages of the human visual system.
  • Discuss chromatic adaptation and its critical role in color perception.
  • Understand and differentiate among illuminant, observer, and device metamerism.
  • Understand the utility of uniform color spaces and color appearance attributes.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, students, and managers involved in the design of color processing algorithms or color imaging systems.  

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the SPIE/IS&T Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011–2015). Sharma is a fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 12, 2017

 

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Four-hour classes
8:00 – 12:15

T1A: Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance  New Instructor

8:00 – 12:15 (4 hours)
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester

Building on a foundation in basic color science and colorimetry, this course provides attendees a broad understanding of color appearance phenomena and introduces them to color appearance modeling. The relationship of these important color appearance phenomena to the state of adaptation of the human visual system is explained. Students learn the perceptual color attributes of lightness, brightness, colorfulness, saturation, chroma, and hue. The course presents widely-used computational models for evaluating correlates of these attributes. Spatial aspects of color vision are discussed, as well as simple models for spatial color perception.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how changes in the state of visual adaptation affect the perceived appearance of colors.
  • Identify the main elements of a color appearance model and explain the critical role of chromatic adaptation in color appearance.
  • Describe the Von Kries model for chromatic adaptation transformations, and perform computations using the model.
  • Apply the CIECAM02 color appearance model to obtain colorimetric representations for different viewing conditions.
  • Understand how relevant color appearance parameters are determined for real-world viewing environments.
  • Describe the components of commonly-used spatial color appearance models.

Intended Audience: color engineers, research scientists, and software developers involved in design and optimization of color imaging systems, algorithms, and devices. Prior knowledge of fundamental colorimetry is assumed.

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the SPIE/IS&T Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011–2015). Sharma is a fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.

13:30 – 17:45

T3C: Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice  New Class

13:30 – 17:45 (4 hours)
Instructors: Dietmar Wueller, Image Engineering GmbH & Co. KG, and Eric Walowit, consultant

This short course covers the process of colorimetric camera characterization in theory and practice. The need for camera characterization and calibration, and the impact on general image quality, is first reviewed. Known issues in traditional approaches are discussed. Methodologies for building camera colorimetric transforms and profiles are detailed step-by-step. State-of-the-art solutions using current technology are presented including monochromators, multispectral LED light sources, in situ measurements of spectral radiances of natural objects, and modern color transform methods including multidimensional color look-up tables. A live demonstration is performed of the end-to-end process of spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display. This course provides the basis needed to implement advanced color correction in cameras and software.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the need for camera colorimetric characterization and the impact of color calibration on image quality and manufacturing yield.
  • Perform target-based and spectral-based camera characterization.
  • Solve for colorimetric camera transforms and build profiles using linear and nonlinear techniques.
  • Evaluate current colorimetric camera characterization hardware and software technology and products.
  • Participate in hands-on spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display.

Intended Audience: engineers, project leaders, and managers involved in camera image processing pipeline development, image quality engineering, and production-line quality assurance.

Dietmar Wueller studied photographic sciences from 1987 -1992 in Cologne. He is the founder of Image Engineering GmbH & Co. KG, one of the leading suppliers of test equipment for digital image capture devices. Wueller is a member of IS&T, DGPH, and ECI and the IS&T Secretary. He is the German representative to ISO TC42 WG18 and participates in several other standardization activities.

Eric Walowit’s interests are in color management, appearance estimation, and image processing pipelines for digital photographic applications. He is founder (retired) of Color Savvy Systems, a color management hardware and software company. He graduated from RIT’s Image Science program in 1985, concentrating in color science. Walowit is a member of ICC, ISOTC42, and IST.

Two-hour classes
8:00 – 10:00 AM

T1B: Cone Fundamentals, Color Matching Functions, Luminous Efficiency, and Individual Differences

8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Andrew Stockman, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology

The trichromacy of human color vision depends on the spectral sensitivities of the long-, middle-, and short-wavelength-sensitive (L, M, and S) cones. These functions are also known as the “fundamental” color matching functions (CMFs) or cone fundamentals. They are the physiological determinants of human color matching, and thus all other CMFs should be linear transformations of them. The cone fundamentals of Stockman & Sharpe (2000) have been adopted by CIE TC 1-36 as the “physiologically-relevant” international standard for colorimetry. This course covers the physiological underpinnings of those cone fundamentals, their derivation and their relationship to other color matching functions, and luminous efficiency functions. As well as being important as mean or standard functions, the functions can also be modified to account for individual differences.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of phototransduction and how it relates to univariance and to cone spectral sensitivities.
  • Learn about the determination of cone spectral sensitivities in normal and color deficient observers.
  • Appreciate the relationship of cone spectral sensitivities to RGB color matching functions.
  • Observe the relationship of cone spectral sensitivities to luminous efficiency functions and the determination of luminous efficiency.
  • Appreciate the relationship of cone spectral sensitivities to XYZ color matching functions and the derivation of the CIE TC 1-36 XYZ CMFs.
  • Learn how molecular genetics affect cone spectral sensitivity.
  • Origins of individual differences in cone spectral sensitivity.
  • Adjust standard cone spectral sensitivities to take into account individual differences.
  • Measure individual differences.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers with an interest in the basics of color vision and colorimetry and the application of the new CIE TC 1-36 “physiologically-relevant” international standard.

Andrew Stockman has been the Steers Chair of Investigative Eye Research at University College London (UCL) Institute of Ophthalmology since 2001. His broad research area is visual psychophysics; his specializations include color vision, rod vision, visual adaptation, temporal sensitivity, and clinical psychophysics. He is best known for his work on human spectral sensitivities. The Stockman & Sharpe cone spectral sensitivities and the related luminous efficiency function have been adopted by the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) as an international standard for color definition and color measurement. He is the principal author of the Colour & Vision Research Laboratories database website (www.cvrl.org), a widely-used color resource for both science and industry.  

Cancelled  T1C: Fundamentals of Spectral Measurements for Color Science Cancelled

8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: David R. Wyble, Avian Rochester, LLC

This short course begins by defining the basic terms surrounding the instruments and quantities used in spectral measurements in the color field. It covers the operation and construction of spectrophotometers and spectroradiometers by discussing the function of each of the various subsystems present in the devices. Instrument standardization (calibration) and the application of CIE geometries for reflectance and transmittance are also covered. To evaluate instruments, the concepts of precision and accuracy of measurement devices are introduced along with practical suggestions for the analysis of instrument performance. The overall goal is to fully understand the procedures and concepts that lead to proper spectral measurements, the basis for colorimetric calculations.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the components of spectrophotometers and spectroradiometers and the functions of each.
  • Define the standardization (calibration) process of spectrophotometers and understand the implications of standardization upon the measurement process.
  • Interpret measurement requirements and select appropriate measurement parameters and geometries for various applications.
  • Understand the point of “hand-off” from spectral measurements to colorimetric calculations.

Intended Audience: color engineers and technologists responsible for making and interpreting color measurements of any type. A technical background is not required, although an understanding of basic scientific principles will be very helpful.

David R. Wyble is president and founder of Avian Rochester, LLC. Since 2011, Avian Rochester has been delivering color standards; traditional and custom measurements; and consulting services to the color industry. Prior to founding Avian Rochester, Wyble was a color scientist within the Munsell Color Science Laboratory, at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and before that a Member of Research & Technology Staff at Xerox Corp. He holds a BS in computer science and MS and PhD degrees in color science from RIT and Chiba University, respectively.  

T1D: Color Optimization for Displays

8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Gabriel Marcu, Apple Inc.

This course introduces color optimization techniques for various display types (LCDs, plasma, OLED, and projection: DLP, LCD, LcoS), and ranging from mobile devices to large LCD TV screens. Factors such as technology, luminance level (including HDR), dynamic/static contrast ratio (including local dimming), linearization and gamma correction, gray tracking, color gamut (including wide gamut), white point, response time, viewing angle, uniformity, color model, calibration, and characterization are discussed and some color optimization methods for displays are presented.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the critical color parameters for displays and their impact on display quality for smart phones, tablets, notebooks, desktops, LCD TV, and projectors.
  • Understand color performance and limitations for various LCD modes like IPS, MVA, FFS, and performance of the LED backlighting and quantum dot gamut enhancement.
  • Select the optimal color model for a display and highlight its dependency on display technology.
  • Understand the translation of the color model into the display ICC profile and how it is used by the color management module.
  • Follow a live calibration and characterization of an LCD screen and projector used in the class, using tools varying from visual calibrator to instrument based ones.
  • Apply the knowledge from the course to practical problems of color optimization for displays.

Intended Audience: engineers, scientists, managers, pre-press professionals, and those confronting display related color issues.

Gabriel Marcu is senior scientist at Apple Inc. His achievements are in color reproduction on displays and desktop printing (characterization/calibration, halftoning, gamut mapping, ICC profiling, HDR imaging, RAW color conversion). He holds more than 80 issued patents in these areas. Marcu is responsible for color calibration and characterization of Apple display portable and desktop products. He has taught seminars and courses on color topics at various IS&T, SPIE, and SID conferences and IMI Europe. He was co-chair of the 2006 SPIE/IS&T Electronic Imaging Symposium and of CIC11; he is co-chair of the Electronic Imaging Symposium’s Color Imaging Conference: Displaying, Hardcopy, Processing, and Applications. Marcu is an IS&T and SPIE Fellow.

10:15 – 12:15

T2B: Fundamentals of Psychophysics

10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology

Psychophysical methods from experimental psychology can be used to quantify the relationships between the physical properties of the world and the qualities people perceive. The results of psychophysical experiments can be used to create models of human perception that can guide the development of effective color imaging algorithms and enabling interfaces. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychophysics and teaches attendees how to develop experiments that can be used to advance color imaging research and applications. Hands-on examples are used throughout so that attendees understand how to design and run their own experiments, analyze the results, and develop perceptually-based algorithms and applications.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the major techniques for measuring perceptual thresholds and scales.
  • Design perception experiments using these techniques.
  • Analyze the data from these experiments to derive perceptual metrics.
  • Apply these metrics to practical problems in color imaging.

Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to be able to interpret the results of perception psychology experiments and develop their own perception studies. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color and imaging science, engineering, and statistics. No specific knowledge of perception psychology is required. All relevant concepts are introduced in the class.

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

T2C: Spectral Filter Arrays Technology New Class

10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructors: Jean-Baptiste Thomas, Université de Bourgogne; Yusuke Monno, Tokyo Institute of Technology; and Pierre-Jean Lapray, Université de Haute Alsace

This course covers the topic of spectral filter array technology (SFA) from realization to applications through data processing. It looks at three different prototype realizations and discusses specific constraints and achievements. It also covers the design of SFA, such as the SFA pattern and the spectral sensitivity design. The course highlights the SFA imaging pipeline, which includes processing such as demosaicing, high dynamic range, etc. It also provides examples of resulting images and videos, and discuss weaknesses and suggestions for further research and applications. Benefits: Attendees will be able to:
  • Knowledge: understand general concepts of multispectral imaging; summarize and classify spectral acquisition systems; definition of SFA.
  • Design: spatial resolution versus spectral resolution; identify sources of noise in SFA: filters, energy balance, chromatic aberration, etc.; design of spatial and spectral distribution.
  • Pipeline and Processing: denoising, understand and perform demosaicing; visible and NIR interaction; high dynamic range.
  • Applications: estimate spectral reflectance from SFA images; general computer vision applications; joint use of VIS and NIR images.

Intended Audience: research staff, engineers, academics, technology users, camera developers, and industrial users.

Jean-Baptiste Thomas holds a BS in applied physics and MS in optics, image, and vision  from the Université Jean Monnet (France). He received his PhD from the Université de
Bourgogne. Since 2010, he has been associate professor at the Université de Bourgogne. In 2011 he began working on the development of SFA technology. See: http://jbthomas.org/.

Yusuke Monno received his BE, ME, and PhD  from Tokyo Institute of Technology. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the university. His interests are in the theoretical and practical aspects of computer vision and image processing. See: www.ok.ctrl.titech.ac.jp/~ymonno/.

Pierre-Jean Lapray received his MS in embedded electronics engineering and PhD in computer science, image, and instrumentation (2013) from the Université de Bourgogne. He is currently associate professor at Université de Haute Alsace, in the Modélisation, Intelligence, Processus et Systèmes laboratory in Mulhouse. Research interests include vision systems, embedded processing, and real-time applications using FPGA.

 

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T2D: Perceptual DisplayNew Class

10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructors: Tara Akhavan, Greg Ward, and Afsoon Soudi, IRYStec

This course introduces perceptual display platform technology aimed at closing the gap between what is shown on a display/screen versus what is perceived by the human visual system. 3D displays, HDR displays, OLED, and QD displays all bring the display experience one step closer to what is seen in the real world. However none of those displays can provide their users with a real-world experience without considering the other perceptual aspects. The course discusses theories as well as best practices on color perception, contrast perception, and perceived brightness of LCD and OLED displays. An important focus is on how color and contrast are two sides of the same coin. They massively influence display perception and modifying each of the two requires modification in the other. The perceptual display platform approach is discussed in detail for a few applications such as mobile, tablets, automotive, and VR.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understanding the display pipeline.
  • Describe an overview of why perception is the next big thing in the display industry.
  • Learn how to measure perceptual processing algorithm performance.
  • Understand why color and contrast are two sides of the same coin.
  • Describe challenges vs value propositions of deploying perceptual display platform in different markets such as mobile, automotive, and VR.

Intended Audience: graduate students, engineers, scientists, display industry professionals, and capturing industry professionals

Tara Akhavan is a technology entrepreneur and co-founder and CTO of IRYStec a Series-A Montreal based startup in the display industry. She holds a BS in computer engineering, an MS in artificial intelligence, and is finishing her PhD in image processing and computer vision at Vienna University of Technology. Akhavan is marketing vice-chair of the Society of Information Displays (SID).

Greg Ward is a researcher specializing in lighting simulation and rendering, HDR imaging, and photography. He has authored and continues to maintain the Radiance ray-tracing system and the Photosphere HDR image builder and browser. Ward co-invented BrightSide Technologies’s HDR display system (now owned by Dolby). He has co-authored two textbooks, one on radiance and another on HDR imaging.

Afsoon Soudi is a dedicated technologist and entrepreneur with a PhD in physics. She is co-founder and VP R&D of IRYStec. Prior to founding IRYStec, she led multiple research groups with an excellent track record of publications in prestigious journals leading to 250+ citations. Her specialty is characterization of semiconductor nanomaterials including nanowires and quantum dots with applications in electronics and solar cells.  

13:30 – 15:30

Cancelled T3A: Color 3D Scanning and Documentation Process of Cultural Heritage Objects   New Class  Cancelled


13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Robert Sitnik, Warsaw University of Technology

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the process of full color 3D documentation (capture, processing, evaluation, storage and archiving) of a selected group of cultural heritage (CH) objects, including planning, technical requirements specification, realization, monitoring, final model preparation, and archiving. The course introduces the main factors of the process that influence final data accuracy and quality, including required time and budget. The technical requirements of the final data are defined based on the assumed goals. In addition to state of the art techniques for 3D documentation, new multimodal approaches supporting 3D data with color, BRDF, and Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) are discussed. The course covers topics on automation of acquisition and processing of the 3D documentation campaign. Several examples of 3D scanning campaigns are included throughout the course. Practical challenges and factors influencing the data quality are discussed.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basics of different 3D scanning technologies and workflow used in the CH sector.
  • Explore new trends in 3D documentation of CH objects.
  • Understand the benefits and limitations of existing 3D processing pipelines.
  • Become familiar with modern approaches to automation of the 3D documentation process, from acquisition and processing perspectives.
  • Understand the process of 3D documentation, from the planning phase to long term archiving.
  • Effectively select techniques and plan workflow of 3D documentation process for a collection of CH objects.
  • Apply concepts introduced in this course to the solution of real-world problems in planning and co-ordination of 3D documentation campaigns.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, curators, and managers involved in the development, design, engineering, manufacturing, marketing, planning, realization, or evaluation of 3D documentation hardware, or software supporting 3D documentation processes.

Robert Sitnik is an associate professor at the Institute of Micromechanics and Photonics at the Warsaw University of Technology (WUT), Mechatronics Faculty, Poland. His work is centered on 2D/3D/4D imaging and virtual/augmented reality applications. He has more than 100 publications in this field. He received his MSc in optical engineering and his PhD in 3D imaging from WUT. His dissertation focused on development of a 3D scanning technique using structured light. He received his habilitation in 3D/4D imaging in 2012. Sitnik is the head of the Virtual Reality Techniques Division and OGX research group.  

T3B: Characterizing Surface Appearance

13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology

Surface appearance is of critical importance in a wide variety of fields including design, manufacturing, forensics, medicine, and cultural heritage preservation. This short course first introduces a framework for characterizing surface appearance that includes the visual attributes of color, gloss, translucency, and texture. It then reviews efforts that have been made to measure these attributes and describes the psychophysical methods that are used to relate the physical properties of surfaces to their visual appearances. Finally, we discuss the potential for using computer-graphics techniques to simulate the appearances of complex surfaces and describe how new digital imaging technologies are being used to advance the measurement, modeling, visualization, and communication of surface appearance.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to the appearances of complex surfaces.
  • Understand the physical bases of surface appearance and how these bases are measured.
  • Learn about the psychophysical methods used to relate the physical and perceptual aspects of surface appearance.
  • Distinguish the different systems used to describe and communicate surface appearance.
  • Comprehend how computer graphics and digital imaging techniques are rapidly advancing the state-of-the-art in surface appearance characterization.


Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to understand the physics and psychophysics of surface appearance. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color/imaging science and engineering. All specialized concepts will be introduced in the class. 

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

T3D: High Dynamic Range Theory and Technology

13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructors: Alessandro Rizzi, University of Milano, and John McCann, McCann Imaging

High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging is a continuously evolving part of color. HDR painting was invented in the Renaissance; 50  years ago it was a research topic in understanding scenes in non-uniform illumination (Edwin Land’s “Mondrians”); 20 years ago, HDR used multiple exposures to attempt to capture a wider range of scene information (Debevec-Malik’s program and Fairchild’s Survey); 10+ years ago interest evolved to recreating HDR scenes by integrating widely-used LCD with LED illumination (Helge Seetzen’s Brightsides Displays); and today the evolution continues in the current sales of HDR televisions using OLED and Quantum Dot technologies. Standards for HDR video media formats remain an active area of research as well. 

This course reviews the science and technology underlying the evolution of HDR imaging from silver-halide photography to HDR TVs. One emphasis is on measuring the actual physical limitations of scene capture, scene display, and most important the interaction of these systems with human vision. (Vision is itself a HDR sensor with very sophisticated spatial-image-processing algorithms.) A second emphasis is on the differences between single-pixel and spatial comparison HDR algorithms. The course describes the partnership between HDR hardware and human vision that receives, processes, and enjoys HDR reproductions. 

After a detailed description of the dynamic range problem in image acquisition, this course focuses on standard methods of creating and manipulating HDR images, replacing myths with scene measurements, camera images, and visual appearances. The course presents measurements about the limits of accurate camera acquisition (range and color) and the usable range of light for displays presented to human vision. It discusses the principles of tone rendering and the role of HDR spatial comparisons.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explore the history of HDR imaging.
  • Understand dynamic range and quantization: the ‘salame’ metaphor.
  • Compare single and multiple-exposures for scene capture.
  • Measure optical limits in acquisition and display: scene dependent effects of glare.
  • Measure limits of RAW scene capture in LDR and HDR scenes.
  • Measure limits of human vision and calculate retinal luminance for models of vision.
  • Discuss current HDR TV systems and standards: tone-rendering vs. spatial HDR methods.

Intended Audience: anyone interested in using HDR imaging: science and applications. This includes students, color scientists, imaging researchers, medical imagers, software and hardware engineers, photographers, cinematographers, and production specialists.

Alessandro Rizzi is a full professor, department of computer science, University of Milano. He has studied the field of digital imaging and vision since 1990 with a particular interest in color,
visualization, photography, and HDR. He is one of the founders of the Italian Color Group, secretary of CIE Division 8, an IS&T Fellow, and a past vice president. He is topical editor for Applied Color Science of the Journal of Optical
Society of America and associate editor of Journal of Electronic Imaging.

John McCann received a degree in biology from Harvard College (1964). He worked in  and managed the Vision Research Laboratory at Polaroid from 1961 to 1996. He has studied human color vision, digital image processing, large format instant photography, and the reproduction of fine art. His publications and patents have studied Retinex theory, color constancy, color from rod/cone interactions at low light levels, appearance with scattered light, and HDR imaging. He is a Fellow of IS&T and OSA; a past president of IS&T and the Artists Foundation, Boston; recipient of the IS&T/OSA 2002 Edwin H. Land Medal; and IS&T Honorary Member (2005).  

15:45 – 17:45

T4A: Color and Appearance in 3D Printing

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Philipp Urban, Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD

Novel 3D printers can combine multiple colorful materials in a single object enabling the reproduction of an object’s color, texture, gloss, and translucency in addition to its shape. This short course provides an overview of the relevant 3D printing technologies and focuses on the color and appearance reproduction pipeline.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts of 3D printing as they relate to color and appearance.
  • Understand the differences between the existing color-capable 3D printing technologies.
  • Describe ways to represent color and other appearance properties attached to 3D shapes.
  • Learn the main principles of the 3D color reproduction pipeline.
  • Have a basic understanding of 3D surface halftoning.

Intended audience: attendees wishing to become more familiar with the opportunities and challenges of the emerging field of graphical 3D printing, which may include color and imaging specialists, 3D printer designers, and software developers.

Philipp Urban is head of the Competence Center 3D Printing Technology at the Fraunhofer IGD in Darmstadt, Germany, where he works on the appearance reproduction of objects using multimaterial 3D printers. During his career he has been a visiting scientist at the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at RIT and head of the color research group at TU Darmstadt. He holds an MS in mathematics from University of Hamburg and a PhD from Hamburg University of Technology.

T4B: Color Image Quality Assessment

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructors: Marius Pedersen and Seyed Ali Amirshahi, Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory (NTNU)

Image quality assessment is a topic of growing interest that has also been the subject of much recent research. This short course examines the current thinking about color image quality from several different vantage points. The course introduces and presents the core functions used in objective color image quality assessment, including models of the human visual system and how pixel error maps can be converted to a single quality number by spatial summation. Furthermore, it presents some of the most common methods, as well as promising new methods for quality assessment. Also discussed are methods for conducting psychophysical experiments to evaluate specific aspects of image quality and how these results are used to evaluate the performance of objective image quality metrics. The most common performance measures are introduced and examples of the performance of state-of-the-art image quality metrics are shown. The course also focuses on how to identify a set of key image quality attributes, such as tone reproduction, sharpness, contrast, graininess, color fidelity, and artifacts, and to compute these as a set of distinct metrics for evaluating image quality. The use of spider plots to illustrate how they separately and cumulatively affect overall image quality is highlighted. Also illustrated is the use of these image quality concepts for the evaluation of printer workflows. Finally, the use of image quality metrics in biometrics, to evaluate displays, and medical applications is shown.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basic characteristics of the human visual system.
  • Understand methods for conducting psychophysical experiments to subjectively assess image quality.
  • Be familiar with the major image quality metrics in use today and how to evaluate their performance.
  • Understand methods for pooling the results of spatial image quality maps to yield a single-number assessment of overall image quality.
  • Understand what the major image quality attributes are, what they measure, and how they are computed.
  • Generate and interpret spider-plots that provide an integrated view of how a given image performs across a set of image quality attributes.
  • Gain insight into the application of the concepts introduced in this course to the solution of real-world problems in imaging systems development.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, analysts, and managers involved in the design, engineering, manufacturing, marketing, or evaluation of imaging and printing products, algorithms, or systems. Participants should be familiar with the function and basic properties of imaging systems. A rudimentary knowledge of color science, linear systems, and image processing is helpful, but not essential.

Marius Pedersen is associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway. His work is centered on image quality assessment; he has more than 60 publications in this field. He received his PhD in color imaging (2011) from the University of Oslo, Norway. He is currently the head of the computer science group in Gjøvik in the department of computer science, as well as the head of the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory, both at NTNU.

Seyed Ali Amirshahi is a Marie Curie post-doctoral Fellow in the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His research is mainly focused on different aspects of image and video quality assessment and computational aesthetics. He received his PhD from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany (2015). Prior to joining NTNU, he was a post-doctoral Fellow at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California.

T4D: The Role of Color in Counterfeit Detection and Deterrence New Class

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Joel Zlotnick, US Department of State

Recent years have seen dramatic increases in the availability and quality of color office printing devices that have transformed counterfeiting from a specialist endeavor and made it accessible to individuals without technical printing skills. As a result, industry has generated an ever-increasing roster of high-tech security features designed to make counterfeits easy to detect. Despite these advances, the public availability of security feature materials via internet commerce contests the effectiveness of security features as standalone counterfeit deterrence solutions. Traditionally, the backbone of security design has been careful use of color, artwork, and printing press capabilities to produce a document that is resistant to attack. This course affirms and describes the traditional roles of color and artwork in security document design.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe traditional and digital counterfeiting workflows and why they matter.
  • Understand principles of security artwork design used to deter counterfeiting.
  • Illustrate the role of color in the design of counterfeit-resistant artwork.
  • Differentiate between artwork and halftones used in commercial printing and security printing.
  • Compare classes of physical security features that complement security artwork.

Intended Audience: designers, printers, prepress staff, and others interested in counterfeit deterrence strategies for hardcopy documents.

Joel Zlotnick is employed by the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Counterfeit Deterrence Laboratory as a supervisory physical scientist. His current work involves research in security design techniques. He is an instructor on counterfeit detection at the US Department of State Foreign Service Institute. Zlotnick held previous positions at Homeland Security Investigations and US Secret Service forensic laboratories. He holds a BS in chemistry and MSFS in forensic science.

 

10% Savings

Take 3 or more courses and get 10% off your total short course registration fee!
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Cooperating Societies

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German Society for Color Science and Application (DFWG)

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Gruppo del Colore - Associazione Italiana Colore

Imaging Society of Japan

Inter-Society Color Council

IOP



Royal Photographic Society

Suomen Variyhdistys (Finnish Colour Association)