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Monitors Needed

 
Interested in taking a class, but lack funding? Volunteer to be a course monitor. Contact color@imaging.org. Preference given to students.

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SHORT COURSES AND WORKSHOPS
TICKETS REQUIRED FOR ENTRY

Conference Location
Sorbonne Université
Campus Pierre & Marie Curie
Centre International de Conférences Sorbonne Université (CICSU)

Pedestrian access to CICSU is through 4, place Jussieu – 75005 Paris, available Monday to Saturday, from 7:00 to 19:00
Security Note: Bags are searched at the entrance to the campus; please plan time accordingly.

Conference Registration Desk
CICSU Auditorium Foyer; entrance through glass portal in covered patio area; auditorium is one level below ground [campus location]
Monday 21 Oct / 7:30 – 16:00    Tuesday 22 Oct / 7:15 – 18:00      Wednesday 23 Oct / 8:00 – 16:20
Thursday 24 Oct / 8:30 – 15:30     Friday 25 Oct / 8:30 – 12:40

Short courses, Monday and Tuesday: Barre 44-54, 1er étage (first floor)

MONDAY COURSES / WORKSHOPS

8:30 – 17:45 (TBC) GDR APPAMAT Material Appearance Workshop

8:30 – 17:45 SC01: Color and Imaging

 8:00 – 10:00
 10:15 – 12:15  13:30 – 17:45

NEW
SC02: Solving Color Problems Using Vector . . .

SC03: The Art of Making Better Pixels . . .

EXPANDED FOR 2019
SC04: The Human Imaging Pipeline: Color Vision and Visual Processing . . .

TUESDAY COURSES / WORKSHOPS

 8:00 – 10:00  10:15 – 12:15  13:30 – 15:30  15:45 – 18:15

SC05: Color and Appearance in 3D Printing

SC09: Characterizing Surface Appearance

REVISED FOR 2019
SC12: Adv. Colorimetry . . .

W1: Future Directions in Image Quality

SC06: Fundamentals of Psychophysics

REVISED FOR 2019
SC10:
Spatial Color Perception . .
.

SC13: Color Fundamentals in LED Lighting

W2: Lighting and Chromatic Adaptation

SC11: Color Optimization for Displays

CANCELLED NEW
SC07: Digital Cinema Environment & IQ Evaluation

SC14: Using the New Colour Mgmt Technology, iccMAX . . .

W3: Art & Science of High-End Digital Color Print-Making

SC08: Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice

NEW
SC15: Color Imaging Challenges: Mobile Phone Optics

W4: Cultural Heritage Digitalization

COURSE AND WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

SC01: Color and Imaging
Monday 21 October 2019
8:30 – 17:45 (8 hours)
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Level: Introductory

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of color perception, measurement, and representation. The course begins with the psychophysics of color, relating physical descriptions of color, through stages of the human visual system, to perceptual attributes of hue, saturation, and lightness. The anatomy and physiology of the visual system stages are briefly described. From there, basic colorimetric and perceptual color representations are developed, with a particular focus on CIE standards such as the CIEXYZ tristimulus space and the CIELAB and CIELUV perceptually uniform color spaces. Chromaticity representations are discussed as convenient 2D visualization tools.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe the basic findings from color matching experiments and the concept of trichromacy.
  • Transform between commonly used color space representations.
  • Describe how these color representations relate to the stages of the human visual system.
  • Discuss chromatic adaptation and its critical role in color perception.
  • Understand and differentiate among illuminant, observer, and device metamerism.
  • Understand the utility of uniform color spaces and color appearance attributes.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, students, and managers involved in the design of color processing algorithms or color imaging systems.

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the IS&T/SPIE Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011-2015). Sharma is a Fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.

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NEW SC02: Solving Color Problems Using Vector Space Arithmetic
Monday 21 October 2019
8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Michael Vrhel, Artifex Software, Inc.
Level: Intermediate

Matrices and vectors have been used for decades to model color technologies. Besides allowing the modeling of complex systems, this notation is readily implemented in vector-based languages like MATLAB. For some, this material can be overwhelming. The goal of the course is to make this approach to color science problems accessible to everyone. We will first review the basics of matrices and vectors including the conditions under which this notation can be used for color systems. Models in the area of color recording, reproduction, measurement, and transformation are covered. Optimization methods are reviewed, including the determination of closed form solutions. For those problems that cannot be solved directly, numerical methods are required. In these cases, we turn to the use of MATLAB to model example systems. With the models in place, we demonstrate the use of MATLAB’s optimization methods to determine a solution.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the matrix-vector equations often seen at color conferences and in color journals.
  • Express their own color systems in terms of vectors and matrices as well as know when it is appropriate to do so.
  • Determine closed form solutions to
    optimization problems in color.
  • Implement their models in MATLAB and apply numerical optimization methods.

Intended Audience: engineers, students, and those wishing to have a firmer understanding of the mathematical modeling and optimization of color systems.

Michael Vrhel has more than 30 years’ experience in color imaging. He received a PhD in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University. During his PhD studies he was a Kodak Fellow. He was a research associate with the National Research Council and has held positions at Color Savvy Systems, Conexant Systems, TAK Imaging, Pagemark Technology, and Artifex Software. He is the co-author of The Fundamental of Digital Imaging from Cambridge University Press.

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SC03: The Art of Making Better Pixels: High Dynamic Range Display Concepts and Technologies
Monday 21 October 2019
10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: Timo Kunkel, Dolby Laboratories, Inc.
Level: Introductory

The field of High Dynamic Range imaging or HDR was coined more than 20 years ago and has been evolving ever since. Over time, various building blocks have been designed that are suitable to form perceptually-correct, artistically-compelling, and technologically-efficient HDR imaging systems. Now, as those technologies are implemented into an increasing number of mainstream devices, it is important to keep track of several key perceptual and technological concepts in order to avoid pitfalls that can impact image fidelity when processing, transmitting, and displaying HDR imagery. This course is intended as an introduction into HDR display systems and its related imaging pipelines.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how the human visual system perceives the physical world around us and how HDR display technologies cater to this.
  • Assess how we can display a plausible depiction of the ‘real’ physical world and how we convey artistic intent.
  • Identify the importance of a display’s white and black levels, its tone response curve, and quantization steps as well as its color volume.
  • Explain the fundamentals of common HDR and Wide Color Gamut display technologies such as full array dual modulation, OLED, Quantum Dot, and Mini/MicroLED- based display.
  • Differentiate the considerations for creating compelling content that lives up to the capabilities of HDR displays.
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Intended Audience: anyone working in image display related fields such as display design, content creation, image transport and broadcast, and vision science. No direct previous knowledge is required, but a basic understanding of traditional display and imaging concepts is beneficial.

Timo Kunkel is a senior color and imaging researcher in the CTO office of Dolby Labs, Inc. He has been working with HDR imaging concepts for more than 15 years and his main areas of interest are advanced display and imaging technologies and how we can continue bringing them closer to human perception. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of Bristol (UK) and a MSc from the University of Freiburg (Germany).

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SC04: The Human Imaging Pipeline: Color Vision and Visual Processing from Optics to Perception Expanded for 2019
Monday 21 October 2019
13:30 – 17:45 (4 hours)
Instructor: Andrew Stockman, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
Level: Intermediate

The course covers human color vision and visual processing from the optics of the eye to high-level color perception and cognition. Topics include physiological optics and light, the photoreceptor sensor array, univariance and the trichromacy of human color vision, photoreceptor spectral sensitivities and colour matching, melanopsin and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, color-opponent and non-opponent encoding and processing of color signals after the cone photoreceptors, neural processing of visual signals and parallel pathways from eye to brain, color in the cortex, color after-effects, color constancy, color contrast and assimilation, color categories, and color and cognition. Individual differences and color vision deficiencies, which can substantially affect the individual’s experience are described along with their underlying genetic causes. Best practices are reviewed for using the Stockman & Sharpe (2000) LMS cone fundamentals and XYZ color matching functions that form the new CIE 2006 and 2015 TC 1-36 colorimetry standards. Visual effects and illusions are demonstrated to illustrate many of phenomena discussed.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Have a fundamental understanding of human color vision and visual processing and its properties, limitations, and individual differences.
  • Improve optimization choices amongst sensors, imaging pipelines, and displays.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers interested in understanding human color vision and visual processing.

Andrew Stockman is the Steers Professor at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology. His research areas include color vision, rod vision, visual adaptation, and temporal sensitivity. He may be best known for his work with Ted Sharpe on spectral sensitivities and luminous efficiency. He is the principal author of the widely-used colour database at http://www.cvrl.org. In 2016 he received the Colour Group Newton medal, and in 2018 the Inter-Society Color Council Macbeth Award.

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SC05: Color and Appearance in 3D Printing
Tuesday 22 October 2019
8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Philipp Urban, Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGD
Level: Intermediate

Novel 3D printers can combine multiple colorful materials in a single object enabling the reproduction of an object’s color, texture, gloss, and translucency in addition to its shape. This short course provides an overview of the relevant 3D printing technologies and focuses on the color and appearance reproduction pipeline.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts of 3D printing as they relate to color and appearance.
  • Understand the differences between the existing color-capable 3D printing technologies.
  • Describe ways to represent color and other appearance properties attached to 3D shapes.
  • Learn the main principles of the 3D color reproduction pipeline.
  • Have a basic understanding of 3D surface halftoning.

Intended Audience: attendees wishing to become more familiar with the opportunities and challenges of the emerging field of graphical 3D printing, which may include color and imaging specialists, 3D printer designers, and software developers.

Philipp Urban is head of the Competence Center 3D Printing Technology at the Fraunhofer IGD in Darmstadt, Germany, where he works on the appearance reproduction of objects using multimaterial 3D printers. He is also an adjunct professor at the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjovik, Norway. During his career he has been a visiting scientist at the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at RIT and head of the color research group at TU Darmstadt. He holds an MS in mathematics from University of Hamburg and a PhD from Hamburg University of Technology.

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SC06: Fundamentals of Psychophysics
Tuesday 22 October 2019
8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Psychophysical methods from experimental psychology can be used to quantify the relationships between the physical properties of the world and the qualities people perceive. The results of psychophysical experiments can be used to create models of human perception that can guide the development of effective color imaging algorithms and enabling interfaces. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychophysics and teaches attendees how to develop experiments that can be used to advance color imaging research and applications. Hands-on examples are used throughout so that attendees understand how to design and run their own experiments, analyze the results, and develop perceptually-based algorithms and applications.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the major techniques for measuring perceptual thresholds and scales.
  • Design perception experiments using these techniques.
  • Analyze the data from these experiments to derive perceptual metrics.
  • Apply these metrics to practical problems in color imaging.

Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to be able to interpret the results of perception psychology experiments and develop their own perception studies. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color and imaging science, engineering, and statistics. No specific knowledge of perception psychology is required. All relevant concepts are introduced in the class.

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

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CANCELLED  NEW SC07: Digital Cinema Environment (Projectors and Displays) Calibration and Image Quality Evaluation using SMPTE and ISO International Standards
Tuesday 22 October 2019
10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructors: Miloslav Novák, Masaryk Institute of Advanced Studies, Czech Technical University in Prague, and Antonín Charvát, EIZO Group
Level: Intermediate
Learn more about the course in this flyer with images supplied by the instructors

The digital cinema environment – the umbrella of the projector, portal, screen, ambient light, and cinema architecture – is examined from the invention of cinematography to the present, in relation to the spectator's perception. Practical methods of measurement, calibration, and image quality evaluation of digital cinema projectors and displays using ISO and SMPTE international standards and test images are explained.

First, the course demonstrates new guidelines for faster, simpler, and more precise luminance and chrominance measurement using a photospectro radiometer, DCP player, and D‐Cinema 4K display. Next, we describe the calibration principles of the D‐Cinema projector using P7 color space correction. Secondly, we provide an overview of techniques for the determination of measured photometric and colorimetric deviations from the ISO and SMPTE standards with several tools for advanced graphical analysis (ADA) using polarograms and CIEDE2000 formula to better understand specific cinema low level light conditions.

Finally, we practically demonstrate an application of the Digital Cinema Package (DCP) player software installed on the powerful laptop with CUDA GPU and connected to the non‐dedicated portable universal player through dual HD‐SDI outputs, that enables motion picture playback into the D‐Cinema projector or display in 4K resolution.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the complexity and terminology of the digital cinema environment and learn about its similarity to the analog 35mm film projection in cinema history context.
  • Measure luminance and colorimetric coordinates deviation from the reference projector or display and evaluate quality of the measuring device
  • Apply digital cinema projector and display calibration process step-by-step.
  • Learn the techniques for objective and subjective image quality evaluation of the projector or display using ISO and SMPTE standard image tests for digital cinema, including advanced graphical analysis of the measured data.
  • Distinguish strengths and weaknesses of the digital cinema projectors and displays with different manufacturer’s technologies.

Intended Audience: anyone interested in Digital Cinema projection or imaging on display in environments optimized for mesopic vision in low light‐level conditions. Students, researchers, color grading artists, filmmakers, cinema operators, and other users who want to apply SMPTE and ISO standards and image testsfor digital cinema measurement, calibration, and image evaluation for the production ofsuperior imaging experiences.

Miloslav Novák graduated from Film Academy of Miroslav Ondricek where he received his Dipl Tech and continued his studies at the Faculty of Arts of Charles University in Prague. He received his MA (2008) in documentary filmmaking at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague after graduating their editing department (2002). Since 2011, he has been teaching audiovisual technology and restoration at the Silesian University in Opava and at the Academy of Performing Arts where he is completing his PhD study. He has been cooperating with various film and photo archives, museums, and restoration labs as the researcher, technology supervisor and restorer inland and abroad. Now he works at the Czech Technical University in Prague.

Antonín Charvát graduated the Faculty of electrical engineering of the Czech Technical University with a MSc (1986) in cybernetic and computers. He dedicated his career to the field of image technologies (displays, printing, photo, and video facilities, as well as digital cinema). Now he is director of the EIZO Group in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. He has given workshops focused on color management and image technologies in different higher educational programs at various Czech and Slovak schools. There he prepared and tested different image technology postproduction workplaces for students.

Karel Fliegel received his MSc and PhD degrees in 2004 and 2011, both in electrical engineering and radioelectronics, from the Czech Technical University in Prague. Now he is an assistant professor with the Multimedia Technology Group. His research interests include image and video processing, compression, digitization or imaging systems.

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SC08: Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice
Tuesday 22 October 2019
8:00 – 12:15 (4 hours)
Instructors: Dietmar Wueller, Image Engineering GmbH & Co. Kg, and Eric Walowit, consultant
Level: Intermediate

This short course covers the process of colorimetric camera characterization in theory and practice. The need for camera characterization and calibration and the impact on general image quality is first reviewed. Known issues in traditional approaches are discussed. Methodology for building camera colorimetric transforms and profiles are detailed step-by-step. State-of-the-art solutions using current technology are presented including monochromators, multispectral LED light sources, in situ measurements of spectral radiances of natural objects, and modern color transform methods including multidimensional color look up tables. A live demonstration is performed of the end-to-end process of spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display. This short course provides the basis needed to implement advanced color correction in cameras and software.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the need for camera colorimetric characterization and the impact of color calibration on image quality and manufacturing yield.
  • Perform target-based and spectral-based camera characterization.
  • Solve for colorimetric camera transforms and build profiles using linear and nonlinear techniques.
  • Evaluate current colorimetric camera characterization hardware and software technology and products.
  • Participate in hands-on spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display.

Intended Audience: engineers, project leaders, and managers involved in camera image processing pipeline development, image quality engineering, and production-line quality assurance.

Dietmar Wueller studied photographic sciences (1987-1992) in Cologne. He is the founder of Image Engineering, one of the leading suppliers for test equipment for digital image capture devices. Wueller is a member of IS&T, DGPH, and ECI; he is the German representative for ISO TC 42 WG 18 and also participates in several other standardization activities.

Eric Walowit’s interests are in color management, appearance estimation, and image processing pipelines for digital photographic applications. He is founder (retired) of Color Savvy Systems, a color management hardware and software company. He graduated from RIT’s Image Science program (1985), concentrating in color science. Walowit is a member of ICC, ISO TC 42, IS&T, and CIEJTC10.

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SC09: Characterizing Surface Appearance
Tuesday 22 October 2019
10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Surface appearance is of critical importance in a wide variety of fields including design, manufacturing, forensics, medicine, and cultural heritage preservation. This class first introduces a framework for characterizing surface appearance that includes the visual attributes of color, gloss, translucency, and texture. It then reviews efforts that have been made to measure these attributes, and describe the psychophysical methods that are used to relate the physical properties of surfaces to their visual appearances. Finally, the potential for using computer-graphics techniques to simulate the appearances of complex surfaces is discussed, and how new digital imaging technologies are being used to advance the measurement, modeling, visualization, and communication of surface appearance is described.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to the appearances of complex surfaces.
  • Understand the physical bases of surface appearance and how these bases are measured.
  • Learn about the psychophysical methods used to relate the physical and perceptual aspects of surface appearance.
  • Distinguish the different systems used to describe and communicate surface appearance.
  • Comprehend how computer-graphics and digital imaging techniques are rapidly advancing the state-of-the-art in surface appearance characterization.

Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to understand the physics and psychophysics of surface appearance. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color/imaging science and engineering. All specialized concepts will be introduced in class.

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments, and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

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SC10: Spatial Color Perception and Image Processing Revised for 2019
Tuesday 22 October 2019
10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: Edoardo Provenzi
Level: Intermediate

This short course is divided in two parts, focusing on spatial induction, i.e., the modification of color perception of a point caused by a non-uniform surround, which plays an important role in image processing. To note just a few applications, it is used as a main ingredient to devise color enhancement algorithms and tone mapping operators in the high dynamic range imaging field. The first hour provides a detailed description of a psychophysical technique for measuring the relative strength of spatial induction focusing, at first, on a very simple geometrical configuration and then extending it to more complex and realistic ones. During the following hour, we analyze a variational model that formalizes and extends the previous description to a more general framework that accounts also for cognitive phenomena.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the important perceptual phenomenon of visual induction.
  • Learn a simple mathematical model for color induction and how to implement it through psychophysical experiments.
  • Be introduced to the very powerful concept of variational model, universally used in imaging.

Intended Audience: The course is intended for a very broad audience: master and PhD students, post-doc researchers, scientists, or engineers working in the following disciplines: color science, colorimetry, image processing (especially spatially-varying color enhancement and tone mapping of HDR images), psychophysics or cognitive, and perceptual psychology. More generally, anyone who wishes to get acquainted about some very modern theories of color vision, based on the rediscovery of some profound and beautiful works of our ancestors. This modern vision puts in evidence the need of performing new and fascinating psychophysical experiments, which have the potential to lead to the future era of colorimetry. A general knowledge of calculus and linear algebra is required to fully grasp the concepts that are discussed. A basic knowledge of psychophysics is not necessary but it would be helpful for the sake of a better interaction.

Edoardo Provenzi obtained a master in theoretical physics at the University of Milan (2000) and a PhD in applied mathematics at the University of Genoa (2004). Since 2004, he has been studying color vision and image processing. He is currently working in these research fields: color science, geometry of color space, statistics of natural images, and variational techniques in imaging. He worked as associate professor from 2014 to 2017 at the University Paris Descartes. He is Full Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Image Processing Group at the University of Bordeaux since 2017, where he is in charge of the Master program on mathematics for signals and images. He is the author of the book: Computational Color Science: Variational Retinex-like Methods, Wiley & Sons Eds. (2017).

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SC11: Color Optimization for Displays (description updated October 4, 2019 with instructor change)
Tuesday 22 October 2019
8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Michael Murdoch, Rochester Institute of Technology (Note: the instructor for this class has changed as Gabriel Marcu, Apple Inc., is unable to be in Paris.)
Level: Intermediate

Displays, from ubiquitous flat-panel LCDs to the latest HDR OLEDs, must be carefully controlled for robust, predictable color performance. This course will provide attendees with an understanding of color and tone reproduction in a range of display technologies, including “basic” LCDs and advanced technologies like HDR, OLED, VR & AR. Beginning from human perception, the course will cover display categories including light-filtering, emissive, and projection displays, and their characteristics. Additive color models, color gamut, dynamic range, and standard electro-optic transfer functions (EOTFs) including sRGB and HDR PQ will be discussed, along with typical practical system limitations and their effects. Next, the effects of viewing environment will be shown, including physical effects of glare, flare, backgrounds for transparent displays, and adaptive displays that change in luminance and color depending on lighting conditions. Case studies will include HDR variations and optical see-through AR displays.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain different LCD and backlight architectures and compare their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Understand how display color measurements lead to color models, usage and evaluation of display color models, and factors influencing their accuracy.
  • Compare case studies of different display applications and technology choices.
  • Apply display color models to display optimization, color management, and viewing condition problems.

Intended Audience: creators, engineers, and users of image, video, and computer graphics systems who would like to know more about the technology and perception of advanced displays, as well as the effects of different viewing conditions.

Michael Murdoch is an assistant professor in Rochester Institute of Technology’s Munsell Color Science Laboratory, where he teaches psychophysical methods, MATLAB programming, and lighting perception topics. His current research includes the effects of temporally dynamic lighting on visual adaptation and perceived rate of change, inter-observer effects on lighting color rendition, and color appearance and visual adaptation in augmented/mixed reality (AR/MR). Murdoch has deep experience with color perception and system design for solid state lighting, LCD, and OLED displays, rooted in industrial work at Kodak Research and Philips Research. He has co-authored more than 28 journal and conference papers and 18 patents, and he served as the general chair of CIC25 in Lillehammer. His education includes a BS in chemical engineering from Cornell, MS in computer science from RIT, and PhD in human-technology interaction from Eindhoven University of Technology.

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SC12: Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance Revised for 2019
Tuesday 22 October 2019
13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Level: Introductory

Building on a foundation in basic color science and colorimetry, this course provides attendees a broad understanding of color appearance phenomena and introduces them to color appearance modeling. The relationship of these important color appearance phenomena to the state of adaptation of the human visual system is explained. Students learn the perceptual color attributes of lightness, brightness, colorfulness, saturation, chroma, and hue. The course presents widely-used computational models for evaluating correlates of these attributes. Spatial aspects of color vision are discussed, as well as simple models for spatial color perception.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how changes in the state of visual adaptation affect the perceived appearance of colors.
  • Identify the main elements of a color appearance model and explain the critical role of chromatic adaptation in color appearance.
  • Describe the Von Kries model for chromatic adaptation transformations, and perform computations using the model.
  • List additional psycho-physical effects modeled by CIECAM02 and CAM16 color appearance models.
  • Understand how models such as CIECAM02 and CAM16 are used in color management.
  • Outline the basic characteristics spatial color perception.

Intended Audience: color engineers, research scientists, and software developers involved in design and optimization of color imaging systems, algorithms, and devices. Prior knowledge of fundamental colorimetry is assumed.

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the IS&T/SPIE Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011-2015). Sharma is a Fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.

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SC13: Color Fundamentals in LED Lighting
Tuesday 22 October 2019
13:30 – 15:30
Instructor: Michael Murdoch, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Color is one of the most important attributes of lighting, whether for general illumination at home, commercial applications in retail and healthcare, or special applications like cinematography. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology has opened up enormous flexibility in the design of lighting systems while simultaneously increasing energy efficiency over traditional technologies. The flexibility of LED is both an opportunity and a curse: through spectral tuning, LEDs can maximize quality of light and preference for object color rendition – or if not done well, drastically distort object colors. Further, LED spectra can be tuned to influence circadian rhythms via melanopic response. This course explains the ways that color, color rendition, chronobiology, and quality of light can be affected in LED as well as OLED lighting. It explores the different ways systems produce white light, including different phosphor technologies, primaries, and spectral tuning solutions. Measures of efficacy and color rendition are explained, and situations where metrics and measures remain insufficient are discussed.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain different LED color architectures, including RGB, RGBA, phosphor-converted blue pump, tunable white, and warm-dim systems.
  • Understand how spectral characteristics of “white” LEDs affect rendered object colors and what this means for perceived naturalness and preference.
  • Understand multi-primary solution approaches for creating spectral power distributions from discrete LEDs with different optimization goals.
  • Apply and compare color rendition measures including CIE Ra, CIE Rf, TM-30 Rf/Rg.
  • Evaluate spectral power distributions of light for melanopic / chronobiological response.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, and students using or interested in LED lighting systems for research, image capture, or image/product evaluation. Basic knowledge of colorimetry is assumed, but no specialized knowledge of lighting is expected.

Michael Murdoch is an assistant professor in Rochester Institute of Technology’s Munsell Color Science Laboratory, where he teaches psychophysical methods, MATLAB programming, and lighting perception topics. His current research includes the effects of temporally dynamic lighting on visual adaptation and perceived rate of change, inter-observer effects on lighting color rendition, and color appearance and visual adaptation in augmented/mixed reality (AR/MR). Murdoch has deep experience with color perception and system design for solid state lighting, LCD, and OLED displays, rooted in industrial work at Kodak Research and Philips Research. He has co-authored more than 28 journal and conference papers and 18 patents, and he served as the general chair of CIC25 in Lillehammer. His education includes a BS in chemical engineering from Cornell, MS in computer science from RIT, and PhD in human-technology interaction from Eindhoven University of Technology.

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SC14: Using the New Colour Management Technology, iccMAX: Architecture and Practical Applications
Tuesday 22 October 2019
13:30 – 15:30
Instructor: Philip Green, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Level: Intermediate

ICC’s iccMAX colour management technology was published as an ISO standard in February 2019 and is now a stable platform for development. iccMAX introduces many new features and capabilities; foremost among these is the move away from a fixed D50 colorimetric intermediate color space to an ability to connect profiles using any illuminant or observer for colorimetric data or spectral data in any form. ICC has provided a Reference Implementation which greatly simplifies the process of making profiles and applying them to data and images. This course introduces the new features that iccMAX adds to color management and provides detail on the most widely-used processing elements. It shows how to build profiles that incorporate these elements and how to connect profiles, either to other iccMAX profiles or to v2 or v4 profiles. It also shows how to define a sub-set of the new specification for a particular use case.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the situations where iccMAX can be used to address color management needs that cannot be handled in ICC v4.
  • Learn how to use iccMAX in their own implementations, including both research and commercial development.
  • Generate iccMAX profiles and apply them to device data, colorimetry, and spectral data.

Intended Audience: attendees will have basic knowledge and experience of color management with ICC v2 or v4, and a desire to understand the next-generation color management technology, iccMAX.

Philip Green is professor of colour imaging at the Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory, NTNU, Norway. He supervises PhD and master students and teaches courses on a range of color-related topics including cross-media color reproduction and advanced color management. Green has been technical secretary of the International Color Consortium since 2005.

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NEW SC15: Color Imaging Challenges with Compact Camera Optics
Tuesday 22 October 2019
13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Kevin J. Matherson, Microsoft Corporation
Level: Introductory

This short course describes the color imaging challenges created by the unique characteristics of compact camera modules, including AR/VR, automotive, machine vision, and consumer applications. First introduced are the fundamentals of camera optics in small formats for which the availability of suitable materials impacts color quality. Steep chief ray angles result in spatially varying spectrally sensitivity and interact with the goniometric properties of IR-cut filters, dielectric materials, sensor microlenses, color filter array crosstalk, and color shading. Also covered are spherical aberration, spherochromatism, extended-depth-of-field imaging, sharpness transport algorithms, and the design of lenses in which axial color is used to ensure all color planes are in focus. This short course gives the attendee an understanding of the physics and interaction of light, optics, and color as well as the algorithmic foundations for image signal processors in which the optics and ISP are jointly designed with the goal of improving the overall system image quality.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the fundamental challenges posed by compact camera optics on color image processing.
  • Specify the color corrections required to compensate for compact camera optics limitations.
  • Evaluate ISP-based solutions to correct chromatic aberrations and color shading in compact camera systems.

Intended Audience: engineers, project leaders, and managers involved in camera image processing, pipeline development, image quality engineering, and production-line quality assurance, and those who want to understand the challenges of compact camera optics.

Kevin J. Matherson is a director of optical engineering at Microsoft Corporation working on advanced optical technologies for consumer products. Prior to Microsoft, he participated in the design and development of compact cameras at HP and has more than 15 years of experience developing miniature cameras for consumer products. His primary research interests focus on sensor characterization, optical system design and analysis, and the optimization of camera image quality. Matherson holds a masters and PhD in optical sciences from the University of Arizona.

WORKSHOPS

All workshops take place Tuesday 22 October from 15:45 to 18:15, after the short course program. The goal of CIC Workshops is to encourage discussion and exchange of ideas.

Please Note: Workshops are included with a full conference registration; those not attending the full conference may purchase a workshop ticket that also includes admission to the Welcome Reception, which follows at 18:15.

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W1: Future Directions in Image Quality
15:45 – 18:15
Chairs/Conveners: Marius Pedersen and Seyed Ali Amirshahi, NTNU (Norway)

During the last few decades image quality assessment has been an important and attractive field of research. While current state-of-the-art image quality metrics show a high correlation with subjective scores, many challenges still exist. This workshop aims to bring experts from both academia and industry to introduce challenges and possible directions needed to be taken in subjective and objective image quality assessment. A discussion and Q&A session to address possible solutions for these new challenges rounds out the afternoon.

Confirmed speakers/topics:

  • Azeddine Beghdadi (Galilee Institute): image enhancement and issues on quality assessment
  • Aladine Chetouani (Université d'Orléans – Polytech'Orléans): recent trends in machine learning for image quality
  • Christophe Charrier, Université de Caen Normandie): image quality in biometrics
  • Chaker Larabi (University of Poitiers): quality assessment of xr applications
  • Claudio Greco (DxOMark Image Labs):color image quality assessment in smartphones
  • Seyed Ali Amirshahi (NTNU): future of subjective evaluation and crowdsourcing
  • Razvan Lordache (GE Healthcare France): challenges in medical image quality
  • Frédéric Dufaux (University Paris-Sud): the future of video quality metrics

Marius Pedersen is a professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) whose work is centered on image quality assessment. He holds more than 60 publications in this field. Pedersen received his PhD in color imaging (2011) from the University of Oslo. He is currently the head of the computer science group in the department of computer science, as well as the head of the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory, both at NTNU.

Seyed Ali Amirshahi is a Marie Curie post-doctoral Fellow in the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His research is mainly focused on different aspects of image and video quality assessment and computational aesthetics. He received his PhD from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany (2015). Prior to joining NTNU, he was a post-doctoral Fellow at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California.

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W2: Lighting and Chromatic Adaptation
15:45 – 18:15
Chair/Convener: Michael J. Murdoch, RIT (US)

Chromatic adaptation is a marvelous capability of the human visual system, allowing us to respond to changes in illumination and perceive object colors to be relatively stable. Concepts of corresponding colors, color constancy, and illumination estimation are all relevant. This workshop is organized to explore current research related to lighting and its relationship to chromatic adaptation. Key topics for discussion include:

  • Mechanisms for chromatic adaptation and models for chromatic adaptation transforms (CATs)
  • Experimental methods for measuring and tracking visual adaptation
  • Limits of adaptation and factors affecting them
  • Effects of adaptation on visual performance, color discrimination, etc.

Call for speakers: Researchers who want to participate in the discussion or to give a presentation are welcome to submit their proposal for review via color@imaging.org (subject line: Lighting Workshop).

Confirmed speakers/topics:

  • Marcel Lucassen (Signify): chromatic discrimination under different spectral lighting conditions
  • Michael Murdoch (RIT): chromatic adaptation to temporally-dynamic lighting
  • Kevin Smet (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven): chromatic adaptation, effects of background field size, mixed illumination, and chromatic lighting

Michael Murdoch is an assistant professor in RIT's Munsell Color Science Laboratory, where he teaches psychophysical methods, MATLAB, and lighting topics. His research covers temporally dynamic lighting, perception of advanced displays, and color appearance in augmented reality. Murdoch’s experience with color perception and system design for solid state lighting, LCD, and OLED displays is rooted in industrial work at Kodak Research and Philips Research. He has studied at Cornell, RIT, and Eindhoven University of Technology.

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W3: The Art and Science of High-End Digital Color Print-Making
15:45 – 18:15
Chairs/Conveners: Peter Morovic, HP Inc. (Spain) and Ján Morovic, HP Inc. (UK)


Creating subtle yet impactful fine-art prints–be it reproductions of other forms of art or originals produced directly as digital prints such as graphic design, digital art, or photography–used to be the exclusive domain of artisanal processes mastered by highly-skilled print-makers with many years of experience, often working alongside the artists themselves. Over the past few decades, many applications previously reserved for these traditional, analogue processes have given way to digital technologies. For example, fine art photographers – whether they capture in analogue or digital – have been exploring the possibilities of digital print and its new potential.

Printing technologies have evolved to multi-primary printing, higher printing resolutions, smaller and more precise drops, and ink and substrate development resulting in large color gamuts, as well as unprecedented light-fastness on the order of hundreds of years. Likewise, printing pipelines and workflows have undergone drastic innovations in the areas of color management, color separation and halftoning, and an ability to handle the multitude of complex transformations required to go from the digital input to the final, physical print. Even staunch analogue advocates experiment with digital, whether by considering a full transition or combining analogue and digital processes, such as digital negatives.

This workshop brings together state-of-the-art in all the aspects that work in concert to deliver high-end, fine art prints, while at the same time highlights areas where there are still opportunities for improvement or new applications that are impossible today. While in some areas, science and technology have closed the gap with analogue print making processes, the opportunities with digital printing are still to be discovered. This workshop combines talks on relevant topics with demos and print samples, to be reviewed by attendees and discussed together.

Confirmed speakers:

Clotilde Boust (Louvre)
Digital Photography for Art Conservation Clotilde Boust is head of the imaging group in the research department of the Center for Research and Restoration, working for a French museum, where she produces scientific imaging for art conservation (photography, UV, IR, X-rays, 3D). She was previously assistant professor in photography. She has a PhD in optronics about color preferences from Paris 6 University.

Ján Morovic and Peter Morovic (HP Inc.)
High-end Printing Pipelines and Workflows in the (Truly) Digital Age Given high-quality content from artists, designers, and restoration scientists, as well as fine-art substrates of exceptional quality, the task of color workflow and pipelines is to use substrates, inks, and printing systems to their maximum potential, while staying faithful to and honoring the original content. In this talk we  cover recent advances in how to achieve this delicate balance and give an overview of what it takes to build resources for advanced, multi-primary and multi-drop printing systems that result in the most natural print-out of the highest image quality. Ján Morovic received his PhD in color science from the University of Derby, UK (1998), where he then worked as a lecturer. Since 2003 he has been at HP Inc. as a senior color scientist and later master technologist. He also has served as the director of CIE Division 8 on Image Technology. He is the author of Color Gamut Mapping (Wiley and Sons) and more than 100 papers, and has filed more than 150 US patents (48 granted). Peter Morovic received his PhD in computer science from the University of East Anglia, UK (2002) and holds a BSc in theoretical computer science from Comenius University, Slovakia. He has been a senior color and imaging scientist at HP Inc. since 2007, has published more than 60 scientific articles, and has more than 150 US patents filed (45 granted) to date. His interests include 2D/3D image processing, color vision, computational photography, and computational geometry; his Erdos number is 4.

Stefan Neumann (Hahnemühle)
Paper-making Effect on Longevity of Fine-art Prints In this talk, the topic of the durability of prints are discussed—in terms of lightfastness, water-fastness, scratchability—the most frequent questions in fine-art printing and a key concern for artists and collectors alike. The demands on a paper mill in regards to papermaking and coating are covered, as well as the use of optical brightener agents and their effect on the final print in terms of image quality and color gamut. Stefan Neumann is technical support manager at Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH. He holds a degree in engineering for printing technology from the Bergische Universität Wuppertal and has previously worked as a consultant for digital printing and color management and as an educator at Offsetprinter. He’s been lecturing worldwide on digital printing, color management, and papermaking since 1993 and is a member of DIN and FDI.

Joseph Padfield (National Gallery London)
Imaging and Printing Old Master Paintings at the National Gallery, London The National Gallery, London houses the UK’s national collection of Western European paintings from the 13th to the 19th centuries. The Gallery's aim is to care for the collection, to enhance it for future generations, and to study it, while encouraging access to the pictures for the education and enjoyment of its more than 5 million physical visitors per year and its 6.5 million virtual visitors through international exhibitions, digital projects, talks, and publications. Producing high-quality digital images and printed reproductions, in research publications or simply as posters for the visiting public, is a key aspect of this work. This talk briefly presents some of the history of digital imaging and printing research within the National Gallery before moving on to outline its current imaging and printing practices, covering the general procedures and equipment used and highlighting a few possible areas of improvement. The talk then introduces some of the newer areas of imaging research being explored within the Gallery, including Hyper Spectral Imaging, which could contribute to new improvements in printing in the future. Joseph Padfield is a principal scientist (National Gallery London) with expertise in preventive conservation, color science, conservation documentation, technical examination of paintings, generating/sharing digital images, image processing, web development, data management and integration systems development, database development, open-linked data, RDF triple stores, and the semantic web. His main research interests include digital documentation and museum lighting, specifically investigating how the introduction of new types of lights (e.g., LEDs), affects how we compare and select appropriate lighting for museums. He is responsible for several of the National Gallery’s collaborative national and international external research projects.

Marianna Santoni (photographer) and Cyril Bertolone (Canson Infinity)
The Challenge of Red!
Red is the color of extremes from love and seduction to danger, anger and strength. All of these extremes have been depicted by artists and photographers for centuries and yet even today red continues to be a challenge, to interpret accurately through the fine art print process. Commercial photographer, Marianna Santoni reveals her latest project that looks at the challenge of red from an artistic and technical perspective from the capture of the image through to the final digital fine art print. Italy-based international photographer and high-end retoucher, Marianna Santoni is a worldwide acclaimed Photoshop expert who has won many top awards in the industry. Santoni is a Canson Infinity Ambassador. Cyril Bertolone, technical manager for Canson Infinity, has been in the paper and digital fine art industry for 30 years and began in the R&D department at Canson Infinity. Today, Bertolone is responsible for all the technical aspects relating to the digital fine art business at the company. Cyril Bertolone, technical manager, Canson Infinity, then dives deeper into the technical aspects of fine art digital printing and outlines some of the challenges that photographers and artists face today along with some solutions to ensure that ‘red is always red’.

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W4: Cultural Heritage Digitalization
15:45 – 18:15
Chair/Convener: Sony George, NTNU (Norway)

Cultural heritage digitalization is high interdisciplinary. By facilitating the interaction between color experts, imaging scientists, and people working in the cultural heritage sector, our goal is to help researchers better understand the challenges and opportunities in this area. Research and case studies conducted by experts from different domains help us understand strategies for acquisition, analysis, and the constraints/needs of the end-users. The expert panel includes conservation scientists, technology researchers, and industry representatives. Presentations focus on the objective of digitization, data quality standards, location of critical areas or interest, challenges specific to artefacts, etc. Discussions highlight the needs and challenges in this sector including conducting research, applications of new technologies, importance of interdisciplinary collaboration, and new skills acquisition. Panelists address strategy and propose solutions related to digitization methods, multimodal imaging systems, possible analysis and limitations, supporting restoration, visualization, tools for analysis, time and accuracy, and data reuse.

Confirmed speakers:

Christian Degrigny (Haute Eclose Arc Conservation-Restoration)
Restoration: technical study and conservation condition of Château de Germolles’s wall paintings using imaging techniques combined with non-invasive analytical techniques.
The Château de Germolles is situated in Burgundy, France. It is the best preserved residence of the Dukes of Burgundy (1380-1400). Its medieval wall decoration was rediscovered under the nineteenth-century plasters during World War II. No scientific documentation accompanied these interventions and important questions, such as the level of authenticity of the mural decorations and the original painting technique(s) used in the medieval times, remained unanswered. The combined scientific and financial supports of COSCH Cost Action and DRAC-Burgundy enabled us to study Germolles’s wall paintings using some of the most innovative imaging, alongside more traditional analytical techniques, and to address some of the questions raised. The objectives were to distinguish the original materials from those applied during restoration and identify those materials. We also tried to understand the medieval painting techniques used and assess their condition. This work is still in progress while a 3D virtual representation of the original decoration is currently proposed to the public to improve visitor experience.

Lindsay McDonald (University College London):
Visual Realism in Digital Heritage
To be convincing, digital heritage needs to represent physical objects and render them in a way that looks realistic when viewed on a display. The problem is difficult enough for flat 2D surfaces viewed under arbitrary sources of illumination, but is much harder for 3D objects with curved surfaces of diverse materials, especially with varying gloss. Reflectance Transform Imaging (RTI) uses a set of images taken with directional lighting in an illumination dome or with a hand-held light source to create the illusion of viewing a 3D surface. The structured image set also offers the possibility of estimating the reflectance distribution function of the surface, leading to rendering by a model that adds the body colour (diffuse) and specular (glistening) components at each pixel for any direction of incident illumination.

Robert Sitnik (Warsaw University)
3D documentation process of cultural heritage objects: towards automation. High-resolution 3D measurement allows us to document the surface of cultural heritage objects with accuracy  corresponding to the typical needs of art conservators. They are characterized by a small measuring field, which consequently requires the execution of many directional measurements in order to visualize the entire surface. Due to the costs and limitations of the human operator, the use of techniques that automate the acquisition and processing of data becomes justified. In this presentation, a case study of two digitization strategies is presented: 3DMADMAC|AUTOMATED and, its improved version, HD3D|AUTO system. Various problems—found during tests of the first system—are discussed, along with their solutions, which were introduced in the second system. At the end, several examples of documented surfaces are presented.

Vitaliy V. Yurchenko (Norsk Elektro Optikk A/S)
Key quality indicators of hyperspectral cameras: current status and case study from pigment analysis. Hyperspectral cameras proved to be a powerful tool for studies and analysis of objects of cultural heritage (CH). Recognition of spectral properties of small features imposes special requirements to the very design of hyperspectral cameras. The actual resolution critically depends, among other factors, on spatial and spectral misregistration also known as the keystone and the “smile” effects. In this session, we discuss these features and consider their practical importance, exemplified by recent case studies for material analysis of cultural heritage artefacts.

Convener: Since 2017, Sony George has been an associate professor at the department of computer science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). He is a member of the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory (www.colourlab.no), where he teaches, supervises students, and serves as the Norwegian coordinator for the French-Norwegian International Master Degree. George obtained a PhD in photonics from the Cochin University of Science and Technology in India (2012). His research interests are in the field of color imaging, hyperspectral-multispectral imaging, and 3D imaging. He has been involved in several national and EU projects in multiple roles, including H2020 EU MSCA-ITN projects, HiPerNav, and CHANGE (https://change-itn.eu/).

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