Important Dates

Submission Deadline
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

1 Oct 2018
Rolling Basis
Notification of Acceptance
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

Early Dec 2018
Mid Dec 2018
Final Manuscripts Due
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

1 Jan 2019 (max)
15 March 2019
Early Registration Deadline
15 April 2019
Conference Starts 14 May 2019

Exhibitors



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in Exhibiting at or Sponsoring Archiving? Contact Donna Smith (dsmith@imaging.org) for details.


Join an international community of technical experts, managers, practitioners, and academics from cultural heritage institutions, universities, and commercial enterprises, to explore and discuss the digitization, preservation and access of 2D, 3D, and AV materials.

Conference Location: Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo (technical sessions) and Edificio U, Universidade Lusófona (short courses)

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Archiving 2019 Short Courses (14 May 2019)

Capture Track: Getting good color/data
Processing Track: Working with images/data
Workflow Track: Tracking images/data
Access Track: Sharing images/data

 


Special Notes for Short Courses

Please register for courses early to insure that they run. Short courses only registration is possible; conference registration is not required to take classes.

Take 3 classes and receive a 10% discount. 

Monitors needed for classes; take a class for free in exchange for helping IS&T and instructors. Contact archiving@imaging.org for details.


2-hour Classes 8:45 – 10:45

NEW for 2019! SC1A: Introduction to Color Measurement for Archiving 
Time: 8:45 – 10:45 (2 hours)
Track: Capture: Getting good color/data
Level: Introductory
Instructor: David R. Wyble

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member   $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 

Benefits: This course enables the attendee to: 
  • Understand the terminology of calibration and applications for color measurements.
  • Understand the best practices for color measurements.
  • Interpret measurement results, and the implications of the various parameters in CIELAB calculations.
  • Understand some of the processes of managing an array of instruments across an organization.
Course Description  This class is your best practices guide for color measurement. To help us all speak the same color language, we start by defining the terms describing the instruments and quantities used in color measurement. Besides instrumentation, you also need to know about what you actually measure: samples and sample preparation. After you take that measurement, you get data, and probably lots of it. You’ve probably heard of RGB data, but that is not going to be as useful as you might think. We learn about color spaces that can relate the instrument data to how people see colors—which is the ultimate goal of color measurement. The data need to be incorporated into a program that operates within your other work processes. And like other work processes, you will want to track the performance of your instruments: How do they compare with each other? Are they consistent over time? We would call this managing a measurement program. When we are done you should understand how to take a measurement (there will be real instruments on hand), how to interpret color data (we will take measurements and look at the results), and how to track and compare instruments over time. This course is intended to prepare attendees for two additional short courses: SC2A: Advanced Concepts in Color Measurement and SC4A: Introduction to Color Management for Cultural Image Capture, although it is not a required prerequisite for either.

Intended Audience: Anyone responsible for making or interpreting color measurements, or managing those that do. A technical background is not required, although an understanding of basic scientific principles is very helpful.

David R. Wyble is president and founder of Avian Rochester, LLC. Since 2011, Avian Rochester has been delivering color standards; traditional and custom measurements; and consulting services to the color industry. Prior to founding Avian Rochester, Wyble was a color scientist within the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and before that a member of research and technology staff at Xerox Corp. He holds a BS in computer science and an MS and PhD in color science from RIT and Chiba University, respectively.


NEW for 2019! 
SC1C: JHOVE 101: Open Source File Format Validation
Time: 8:45 – 10:45 (2 hours)
Track: Workflow: Tracking images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Martin Wrigley

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 

Benefits:
This course enables the attendee to:
  • Gain an understanding of the levels of file format validation and why this is important in preservation and archiving.
  • Learn how to install and configure JHOVE.
  • Get hands-on experience using JHOVE and learning how to interpret the results.
  • Understand JHOVE’s capabilities and limitations.
  • Find out how to report bugs, request features, and contribute to improving JHOVE using GitHub.

Course Description 
This course provides participants with an understanding of how to: use JHOVE, a file format validation tool; how to interpret the results; and how to contribute to improving open source tools.

The course also provides an introduction to file format validation and explains the different levels of validation: well-formedness, validity, and consistency. Participants learn which formats JHOVE modules cover, with a particular focus on the PDF module. We examine the capabilities and limitations of JHOVE’s functionality.

After discussing the installation and configuration of JHOVE, we use the JHOVE test corpus to run the software and investigate the results. Participants are encouraged to bring a sample test set of their own data to use in the course. Additional features of JHOVE and course activities include understanding error messages and looking at the current JHOVE development roadmap and plans for the future.

Intended Audience: Anyone new to JHOVE interested in getting some hands-on experience using the software and current JHOVE users who want to know more about interpreting validation results.

As technical lead for Open Preservation Foundation (OPF), Carl Wilson advances all of OPF’s technical activities. He is an experienced software engineer with a focus on software quality through testing, and an open source enthusiast, both as a user and developer.

OPF Executive Director Martin Wrigley is responsible for working with OPF members and the Board to develop the future strategy and enhance OPF’s portfolio of open source digital preservation tools.


NEW for 2019! SC1D: Introduction to IIIF

Time: 8:45 – 10:45 (2 hours)
Track: Access: Sharing images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Peter Fornaro

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before  
 15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
 15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 


Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:

  • Gain knowledge of IIIF protocols and capabilities, as well as the needs of the server and functionality of the API
  • Understand the requirements of the master file
  • Learn how an IIIF request is made
  • List the features IIIF offers, and what it cannot yet do

Course Description 
Interoperability is the next level of giving access to data. The most famous initiative to make data interoperable is IIIF, the international image interoperability framework. IIIF standardizes the access to image resources and allows for standardized searches. Images can be adjusted in size, cropped, and/or rotated on the fly, while being accessed. Such a flexible request to images simplifies the data structures needed and allows flexible image presentation. Due to the fact that only the image master must be stored, the process of archiving is much simpler and data volume reduced. This practical course details the concept of IIIF; the requirements of the master file and IIIF server; the functionality of the API; and IIIF’s current features.

Intended Audience: Anyone who wants to learn how to work with IIIF.

Peter Fornaro is in the management team of the Digital Humanities Lab of the University of Basel. Fornaro has a degree in electrical engineering and photography as well as a PhD in physics. He is doing research and teaching in the field of digital archiving, imaging, cultural heritage preservation, and computational photography.

After obtaining an MSc in chemistry from the University of Basel and working at ETH Zürich as a research assistant in organic chemistry, Alexander Käslin started his own company offering tutoring in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Since 2018, he has worked as a product manager at Truvis AG, which develops innovative software solutions for digital imaging.

4-hour Class 8:45 – 13:00


NEW for 2019! SC1B: Introduction to Digital Image Processing
Time: 8:45 – 13:00 (4 hours)
Track: Processing: Working with images/data 
Level: Introductory
Instructor: Christoph Voges

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 250   $ 300   $ 95   $ 145 
  Non-member  $ 275   $ 325   $ 95   $ 145 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Benefits: This course provides the attendee with insight into image processing algorithms including:

  • Image filtering
  • Frequency analysis
  • Edge detection
  • Feature extraction
Course Description  Digital image processing is a key discipline in digital archiving and related areas. Many professionals in this field are using digital image processing techniques contained in software applications (such as Adobe Photoshop or GIMP) when working with digital images. Normally, these techniques are just being used and details (except some parameters which have to be specified) are “hidden” in the software. In the hands-on part of the course, attendees apply these image processing methods to real digital images.

Intended Audience: Professionals working in digital archiving and related areas who have to work with and/or understand digital image processing.

Christoph Voges is works at Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften (HAWK) in Göttingen, Germany, and as a consultant. He is an experienced lecturer and has held academic courses at various institutions. Voges studied electrical engineering at Technische Universität Braunschweig (Germany) / University of Southampton (UK) and his doctoral thesis was on “Long-term Archiving of Digital Data on Film.” His specific research interests and areas of expertise are information technology as well as signal and image processing, including digital long-term data storage and digital archiving as applications. Voges received the DGPh Robert-Luther-Award (2014), an IS&T Service Award (2015), and the Archiving Conference Obsolete Media Award for Best Interactive Paper (2008 and 2010). Voges served as the Archiving Conference Program Chair (2013) and General Chair (2014).


2-hour Classes 11:00 – 13:00


SC2A: Advanced Concepts in Color Measurement
Time: 11:00 – 13:00 (2 hours)
Track: Capture: Getting good color/data
Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Instructor: David R. Wyble

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before 
 15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
 15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 

Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:
  • Understand the functions of spectrophotometer components.
  • Define the standardization (calibration) process of spectrophotometers and understand the implications of standardization upon the measurement process.
  • Interpret measurement requirements and select appropriate measurement parameters and geometries for various applications.
  • Understand the point of “hand-off” from spectral measurements to colorimetric calculations.
  • Understand the methods for evaluating and correcting spectrophotometers.
Course Description 
This course starts at the end of the introductory course (SC1A) and moves into more advanced topics. The internal details of color measurement instruments are covered: what are the various subsystems, how they relate, and why you should care. The focus is on good spectral reflectance measurements, leading to the calculation of accurate colorimetric data from that spectral data. You also need to know how to standardize (you may say “calibrate”) an instrument, and what that really means. Next we discuss the general types of instruments available: CIE geometries for reflectance and transmittance. Once you have data, how can you know if it is good? And how does it compare with the other instruments in your organization? Precision and accuracy are the terms we use for these comparisons and analyses. With this course, you should fully understand the procedures and concepts that lead to proper spectral measurements which in turn lead to the best colorimetric coordinates.

Intended Audience: Anyone responsible for making or interpreting color measurements, or managing those that do. A technical background is not required, although an understanding of basic scientific principles will be very helpful. It will be assumed that attendees have the background provided in the SC1A introductory course.

David R. Wyble is president and founder of Avian Rochester, LLC. Since 2011, Avian Rochester has been delivering color standards; traditional and custom measurements; and consulting services to the color industry. Prior to founding Avian Rochester, Wyble was a color scientist within the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and before that a member of research and technology staff at Xerox Corp. He holds a BS in computer science and an MS and PhD in color science from RIT and Chiba University, respectively.


SC2B: Spectral Imaging and Technical Aspects

Time: 11:00 – 13:00 (2 hours)
Track: Capture: Getting good color/data AND Processing: Working with images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Fenella G. France and Meghan Wilson

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 

Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:
  • Understand how spectral imaging could improve your institutional digitization.
  • Understand and assess imaging systems and illumination modalities (reflected, side-lighting, transmitted) to best meet the needs of specific collection materials.
  • Integrate the priorities of scholars, curators, and researchers into digital projects.
  • Manage large datasets and metadata
  • Assess the benefits of spectral imaging in relation to specific research questions.

Course Description 
This course examines the connections between non-invasive spectral imaging techniques and the cultural, societal, and provenance information contained within original sources that is not captured in base digitization. Students are introduced to the range of types of spectral imaging that can be undertaken to explore unknown information hidden within the original source material.

Digital studies of cultural heritage collection materials are moving beyond simple RGB image capture to include multispectral imaging. These non-invasive imaging systems provide specialists and researchers with a tool that can reveal hidden information and additional useful data that enables a deeper understanding of collections. The incorporation of a multispectral imaging workflow allows recovery of erased or obscured writing, exposure of important provenance features such as watermarks, the identification of inks and colorants, and provides a means for in-depth analysis of creation techniques and material characteristics. These features are important for scholars, authentication, “fingerprinting”, and the care of collections.

Intended Audience: This course supports a wide range of professionals who work on or are planning to work on collaborative, multidisciplinary projects that would benefit from spectral imaging. These include preservation professionals and scholars; scientists and engineers; digital specialists; program managers and directors; database administrators; and archivists, curators, librarians, and researchers.

Fenella G. France, chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division of the Library of Congress, develops non-destructive imaging techniques for collections. Her focus is spectral imaging and processing techniques to increase links between scientific and scholarly data. She received her PhD from Otago University, New Zealand, and has worked internationally on many heritage projects. She serves on a range of professional committees, collaborating with colleagues from academic, cultural, forensic, and federal institutions. She is currently a distinguished presidential fellow for CLIR.

Meghan Wilson is a preservation science specialist in the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress with a degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art. She has worked extensively on multiple spectral imaging programs around the world and specializes in operation, training, quality control, and data management of this imaging technology.

Special Notes for Short Courses

Please register for courses early to insure that they run. Short courses only registration is possible; conference registration is not required to take classes.

Take 3 classes and receive a 10% discount. 

Monitors needed for classes; take a class for free in exchange for helping IS&T and instructors. Contact archiving@imaging.org for details.


SC2C: Quality Assurance Workflows for Digitization Projects

Time: 11:00 – 13:00 (2 hours)
Track: Workflow: Tracking images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructor: Martina Hoffmann

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 


Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand the need for a suitable QA for digitization of cultural heritage.
  • Identify key questions to start a successful QA workflow.
  • Define the basic ingredients for QA.
  • Understand the principles of a modular QA-workflow.
  • Implement the mix and match principle according to the given basic ingredients. 
Course Description 
This practical course uses the successful quality assurance (QA) workflow process implemented at the National Library of the Netherlands to explain how to set up reliable QA workflow for (mass) digitization projects at cultural heritage institutions. Using real-world examples, we explore the mix and match principle of Simple – Flexible – Efficient – Modular – Low cost – Fast. You learn which modules are useful and how to build a workflow around them. Students are invited to prepare questions on the topic for the group to discuss. 

Intended Audience: Managers, program officers, project leaders, suppliers, and QA managers responsible for (mass) digitization programs. A basic knowledge of digitization projects will be assumed.

Martina Hoffmann is currently senior production manager for digitization at the National Library in the Netherlands for the archival section of Metamorfoze. Previously, she was operational manager for quality control of digitized products there. She has co-
designed several quality assurance workflows for different mass digitization projects in the Netherlands. Her areas of expertise include image quality QA processes, metadata, and long-term preservation.


2-hour Class 14:15 – 16:15


UPDATED for 2019: SC3A: Scanner & Camera Imaging Performance: Ten Commandments
Time: 14:15 – 16:15 (2 hours)
Track: Capture: Getting good color/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Peter Burns and Don Williams
  Fees Regular Student
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 


Benefits:
This course enables the attendee to:
  • Interpret and comply with customer imaging requirements.
  • Establish accountability for imaging performance problems.
  • Compare various levels of FADGI and Metamorfoze guidelines.
  • Critically evaluate manufacturers’ claims of resolution, color errors, and noise.

Course Description 
This is a no-nonsense course on simple and achievable tools/techniques to build a solid digital imaging foundation for the capture of high-quality digital images. We have updated this course from a previous Top Ten Tips publication. These include realistic color management, predictable behavior of branded capture devices, and new methodologies for rapid capture imaging. Specific and practical examples of the use of ISO standards and institutional guidelines are described. More specifically, we address how to meet FADGI and Metamorfoze guideline requirements. The elements of this course can be applied by digital image service providers, collection custodians, and device manufacturers.

Intended Audience: Managers, engineers, and technicians responsible for evaluating and monitoring scanner and camera performance, and emerging guidelines. This includes manufacturers, service providers, and content custodians. A working knowledge of digital scanner and camera operation and their common technologies will be assumed.

Don Williams is founder of Image Science Associates, a digital imaging consulting and software group. Their work focuses on quantitative performance metrics for digital capture of digital imaging devices, and imaging fidelity issues for the cultural heritage community. He has worked for a number of large cultural heritage institutes in practical implementation of image quality controls and is the prime architect for the GoldenThread image quality evaluation tools. He has taught short courses for many years and contributes to several imaging standards activities. 

Peter Burns is a consultant working in digital image evaluation, system monitoring, and image processing. He has experience in several areas of digital imaging, digital photography, mobile imaging, and cultural heritage.

3-hour Class 14:15 – 17:15


EXPANDED for 2019: SC3B: Spectral Image Processing

Time: 14:15 – 17:15 (3 hours)
Track: Processing: Working with images/data 
Level: Intermediate
Instructors: Fenella G. France and Meghan Wilson
Prerequisite: SC2B Spectral Imaging and Technical Aspects

  Fees Regular Student
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
 on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 210   $ 260   $ 80   $ 130 
  Non-member  $ 235   $ 285   $ 80   $ 130 

Benefits: This course increases participants understanding of image processing and the analysis of multiple layers of data, including:

  • Revealing and enhancing non-visible text and information through principal component analysis.
  • Mapping spectral responses (Z-profile) to characterize inks, pigments, and colorants on a range of heritage substrates (paper, parchment, ceramics, textiles).
  • Applying spectral curve analysis to track change over time and identifying at-risk collection materials.

Course Description
Ultimately this course examines the gains from processing spectral data, in particular the cultural, societal, and provenance information contained within original sources that is not apparent without spectral data processing.

The course includes hands-on processing of actual spectral imaging datasets. Course participants are required to bring their own laptops. Free software and datasets are provided for download prior to the course.

Intended Audience: This course supports a wide range of professionals who work on or are planning to work on collaborative, multidisciplinary digital projects that require spectral image processing. These include preservation professionals and scholars; scientists and engineers; digital specialists; database administrators; program managers and directors; and archivists, curators, librarians, and researchers.

Fenella G. France, chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division of the Library of Congress, develops non-destructive imaging techniques for collections. Her focus is spectral imaging and processing techniques to increase links between scientific and scholarly data. She received her PhD from Otago University, New Zealand, and has worked internationally on many heritage projects. She serves on a range of professional committees, collaborating with colleagues from academic, cultural, forensic, and federal institutions. She is currently a distinguished presidential fellow for CLIR.

Meghan Wilson is a preservation science specialist in the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress with a degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art. She has worked extensively on multiple spectral imaging programs around the world and specializes in operation, training, quality control, and data management of this imaging technology.

4-hour Classes 14:15 – 18:30


NEW for 2019! SC3C: End-to-End Digitization Workflow: Goobi-to-Go for Newbies
Time: 14:15 – 18:30 (4 hours)
Track: Workflow: Tracking images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Steffen Hankiewicz and Jan Vonde


  Fees Regular Student
 on or before
 15 April 
 after
 15 April 
 on or before
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 250   $ 300   $ 95   $ 145 
  Non-member  $ 275   $ 325   $ 95   $ 145 

Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:

  • Install Goobi and setup workflows to manage digitization projects.
  • Understand how Goobi is used in different user roles.
  • Enrich digitized objects with detailed metadata and structure information.
  • Configure easy validation rules to guarantee a minimum quality of the digitized objects (files and metadata).
  • Automatically ingest digitized objects into a Fedora repository.
  • Publish digitized objects with metadata and structure data in standardized formats as a digital library including METS files and IIIF Manifests.

Course Description
The subtitle of this course is “How to set up and use your own Goobi instance to digitize and publish your objects via IIIF in less than 30 minutes” which says it all. The course explains how the Goobi software suite (Goobi workflow and Goobi viewer) is used to manage small and even big digitization projects. Attendees learn how to install the Goobi-to-go environment on their own computers and adapt the software to customize workflows, including tasks for automatic jobs, validation, conversion, and metadata enrichment. Attendees also learn how processed digitized objects can be ingested automatically into a Fedora repository and how to publish the results within the Goobi viewer as a digital library system based on automatically generated METS files and IIIF Presentation Manifests.

Participants must bring their own laptops (Windows, Mac, or Linux) for this hands-on session. Please make sure that your computer has Java 8 installed to be able to use Goobi. If needed, meet with instructors prior to the class to prepare your computer.

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in managing digitization projects, no matter their size. No technical skills are required to attend this short course.

Steffen Hankiewicz is a senior software developer, CEO and owner of the German software company intranda GmbH. He has been developing and implementing software solutions for digitization projects for more than 15 years. The open-source workflow management and publishing suite Goobi as well as several automatic tools for cropping, validation, conversion, and many other software for handling 2D and 3D material are some of the current digitization tools he develops and supports together with his team in 16 countries.

Jan Vonde has worked at intranda GmbH since 2010 and supports a variety of digitization projects in several institutions worldwide. Additionally, he is product manager of the Goobi viewer.

NEW for 2019! SC4B: Data Compression Formats for Digital Archiving

Time: 14:15 – 18:30 (4 hours)
Track: Processing: Working with images/data 
Level: Intermediate
Instructor: Christoph Voges

  Fees Regular Student
  on or before  
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  on or before  
15 April 
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 250   $ 300   $ 95   $ 145 
  Non-member  $ 275   $ 325   $ 95   $ 145 


Benefits: This course provides deep insight into data compression methods and enables attendees to understand the fundamental differences, advantages, and limitations of specific compression methods.

Course Description
Today, a large variety of different file formats can be encountered in digital archiving. Many of these formats involve data compression, wherein different types of compression can be used. As an example, JPEG, JPEG2000, and LZW-compressed TIFF are commonly used for storing digital images, whereby each format relies on a different compression method. For digital archiving professionals, detailed knowledge on the compression technique of a specific file format can be very important, e.g., regarding the loss that some techniques may introduce. 

Intended Audience: Professionals working in digital archiving and related areas who have to work with compressed file formats.

Christoph Voges is works at Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften (HAWK) in Göttingen, Germany, and as a consultant. He is an experienced lecturer and has held academic courses at various institutions. Voges studied electrical engineering at Technische Universität Braunschweig (Germany) / University of Southampton (UK) and his doctoral thesis was on “Long-term Archiving of Digital Data on Film.” His specific research interests and areas of expertise are information technology as well as signal and image processing, including digital long-term data storage and digital archiving as applications. Voges received the DGPh Robert-Luther-Award (2014), an IS&T Service Award (2015), and the Archiving Conference Obsolete Media Award for Best Interactive Paper (2008 and 2010). Voges served as the Archiving Conference Program Chair (2013) and General Chair (2014).

2-hour Class 16:30 – 18:30

SC4A: Introduction to Color Management for Cultural Image Capture
Time: 16:30 – 18:30 (2 hours)
Track: Capture: Getting good color/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Don Williams and Peter Burns

  Fees Regular Student
  on or before  
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  on or before   
15 April
 after
 15 April 
  Member  $ 165   $ 215   $ 65   $ 115 
  Non-member  $ 190   $ 240   $ 65   $ 115 


Benefits: This course enables the attendee to:

  • Interpret and comply with customer imaging requirements.
  • Establish accountability for imaging performance problems.
  • Compare various levels of FADGI and Metamorfoze guidelines.
  • Critically evaluate manufacturers’ claims of resolution, color errors, and noise.

Course Description
This course provides an introduction to color management for cultural heritage image capture. We start with the elements of color vision that are behind all practical color imaging systems, then discuss how current imaging technologies for cameras and scanners are chosen to facilitate the capture of standard color images. Specifics of common image transformation from camera detector RGB signals to standard CIE colorimetry are explained. Color-difference measures based on CIELAB color space, and how ICC color profiles are used are explained. Specifically, the CIELAB-based color-difference method used in several institutional standards and guidelines (e.g., FADGI and Metamorfoze) is discussed using several examples.

This presentation is intended to complement another short course, SC1A: Introduction to Color Measurement for Archiving.

Intended Audience: Managers, engineers, and technicians responsible for evaluating and monitoring scanner and camera performance, and emerging guidelines. This includes manufacturers, service providers, and content custodians. Some knowledge of digital scanner and camera operation technologies is assumed, but color science is not.

Don Williams is founder of Image Science Associates, a digital imaging consulting and software group. Their work focuses on quantitative performance metrics for digital capture of digital imaging devices, and imaging fidelity issues for the cultural heritage community. He has worked for a number of large cultural heritage institutes in practical implementation of image quality controls and is the prime architect for the GoldenThread image quality evaluation tools. He has taught short courses for many years and contributes to several imaging standards activities. 

Peter Burns is a consultant working in digital image evaluation, system monitoring, and image processing. He has experience in several areas of digital imaging, digital photography, mobile imaging, and cultural heritage.

1-hour Free Workshop 17:30 – 18:30

NEW: W4D: Workshop Echoes
Join us for the free one-hour ECHOES workshop. Space limited/registration required.
Time: 17:30 – 18:30 (1 hour)
Track: Access: Sharing images/data
Level: Introductory
Instructors: Walther Hasselo and Olav Kwakman

You’ve finished digitizing your collection, worked hard adding the appropriate metadata, and published it on your website. But is there more you can do to stimulate the use of the collection? ECHOES may be a way for you to open up your data and share it with the world by turning it into linked open data. ECHOES provides a set of free, open source software tools to help you transform metadata to linked open data, enrich the data, and search and display it in new and innovative ways via WordPress plugins. During this interactive workshop we demonstrate some of the possibilities.

Walther Hasselo is an Oracle DBA and certified Prince2 project manager. He is co-author of the guidelines for Open Data policies in Cultural Heritage. He has given numerous presentations on new ways of publishing cultural heritage information at varies international conferences. He works at Heritage Leiden as project manager e-Heritage, in which capacity he is also project manager of the ECHOES project.

Olav Kwakman is an IT manager at the cultural heritage institute Tresoar in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, where he currently works on the RedBot project combining Linked Open Data technology (ECHOES) with a network organization model. His work looks at innovative new ways to present digital heritage material within an expert network of collaborating cultural heritage institutes. Kwakman has a degree in computer science and business administration.

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Interested in Exhibiting at or Sponsoring Archiving? Contact Donna Smith (dsmith@imaging.org) for details.

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