Important Dates

 Call for Papers Proposals April 15, 2018
 Call for Workshops April 15, 2018
 Manuscripts Due Sept. 7, 2018
 Early Registration Ends
October 14, 2018
  Hotel Reservations
October 26, 2018
 Conference Starts November 12, 2018

CIC 26

November 12-16, 2018
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Twenty-sixth Color and Imaging Conference
Color Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, and Applications

Join us for a week of color-related courses, workshops, paper presentations, exhibits, and interesting conversations around technical topics and application areas related to color!

Collocated Meetings: 
CIE Division 8 Annual Meeting, Image Technology

CIE TC 8-16 Meeting
see Collocated Events tab

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CIC26 Short Course Program

  Monday Nov. 12       CIC26 Courses  ---  Click course title for details!
8:00 - 17:45  SC01: Color and Imaging (Color Fundamentals Track) Sharma
8:00 - 10:00  SC02: Characterizing Surface Appearance (Advanced Topics Track) Ferwerda
10:00 - 12:15  SC03: (Revised) Color Optimization for Displays (Advanced Topics Track) Marcu
13:30 - 15:30  SC04: (NEW)The Role of Color Science in Smartphone Imaging for Brand Protection and Secure Applications (Advanced Topics Track) Hodgson
15:45 - 17:45  SC05: (NEW) Variational Color Image Enhancement inspired by Human Vision (Advanced Topics Track) Provenzi

  Tuesday Nov. 13       CIC26 Courses  ---  Click course title for details!
8:00 - 10:00  SC08: Individual Differences in Color Matching and Chromatic Adaptation (Spectral Track) Fairchild
8:00 - 10:00  SC09: Fundamentals of Psychophysics (Perceptual Evaluation Track) Ferwerda
8:00 - 12:15  SC06: Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance (Color Fundamentals Track) Sharma
8:00 - 12:15  SC07: Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice (Capture and Display Track) Wueller & Walowit
10:15 - 12:15  SC10: Fundamentals of Spectral Measurements for Color Science (Spectral Track) Wyble
10:15 - 12:15  SC11: (Revised) Colour Difference Perception for Images (Perceptual Evaluation Track) Luo
13:30 - 15:30  SC12: (Revised) From Cone Fundamentals to Color Matching Functions to Cone-opponent, Camera Sensor and Device Color Spaces (Color Fundamentals Track) Stockman
13:30 - 15:30  SC13: The Art of Making Better Pixels: High Dynamic Range Display Concepts and Technologies(Capture and Display Track) Kunkel
13:30 - 15:30  SC14: (NEW) Color Fundamentals in LED Lighting (Spectral Track) Murdoch
13:30 - 15:30  SC15: Color Image Quality Assessment (Perceptual Evaluation Track) Pedersen & Amirshahi

         CIC26 Workshops  ---  Click workshop title for details!
    15:45 - 18:15     W1: Deep Learning in Color Imaging
    15:45 - 18:15     W2: Color in Augmented and Virtual Reality
    15:45 - 18:15     W1: HDR and the Movies

MONDAY NOVEMBER 12, 2018

EIGHT-HOUR CLASS
8:30- 17:45

SC01: Color and Imaging

8:30- 17:45
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Level: Introductory

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamentals of color perception, measurement, and representation. The course begins with the psychophysics of color, relating physical descriptions of color, through stages of the human visual system, to perceptual attributes of hue, saturation, and lightness. The anatomy and physiology of the visual system stages are briefly described. From there, basic colorimetric and perceptual color representations are developed, with a particular focus on CIE standards such as the CIEXYZ tristimulus space, and the CIELAB and CIELUV perceptually uniform color spaces. Chromaticity representations are discussed as convenient 2D visualization tools.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe the basic findings from color matching experiments and the concept of trichromacy.
  • Transform between commonly used color space representations.
  • Describe how these color representations relate to the stages of the human visual system.
  • Discuss chromatic adaptation and its critical role in color perception.
  • Understand and differentiate among illuminant, observer, and device metamerism.
  • Understand the utility of uniform color spaces and color appearance attributes.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, students, and managers involved in the design of color processing algorithms or color imaging systems.

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the SPIE/IS&T Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011-2015). Sharma is a fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.


TWO-HOUR CLASSES

SC02: Characterizing Surface Appearance

8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Surface appearance is of critical importance in a wide variety of fields including design, manufacturing, forensics, medicine, and cultural heritage preservation. This class first introduces a framework for characterizing surface appearance that includes the visual attributes of color, gloss, translucency, and texture. It then reviews efforts that have been made to measure these attributes, and describe the psychophysical methods that are used to relate the physical properties of surfaces to their visual appearances. Finally, the potential for using computer-graphics techniques to simulate the appearances of complex surfaces is discussed, and how new digital imaging technologies, are being used to advance the measurement, modeling, visualization, and communication of surface appearance is described.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the factors that contribute to the appearances of complex surfaces.
  • Understand the physical bases of surface appearance, and how these bases are measured.
  • Learn about the psychophysical methods used to relate the physical and perceptual aspects of surface appearance.
  • Distinguish the different systems used to describe and communicate surface appearance.Comprehend how computer-graphics and digital imaging techniques are rapidly advancing the state-of-the-art in surface appearance characterization.

Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to understand the physics and psychophysics of surface appearance. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color/imaging science and engineering. All specialized concepts will be introduced in class.

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments, and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

REVISED FOR 2018 SC03: Color Optimization for Displays

10:15 – 12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: Gabriel Marcu, Apple Inc.
Level: Intermediate

This course introduces color optimization techniques for various display types (LCDs, plasma, OLED, QLED, and projection: DLP, LCD, LcoS), and ranging from mobile devices to large LCD TV screens. Factors such as technology, luminance level (including HDR), dynamic/static contrast ratio (including local dimming), linearization and gamma correction, gray tracking, color gamut (including wide gamut), white point, response time, viewing angle, uniformity, color model, calibration, and characterization are discussed and color optimization methods for displays are presented.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the critical parameters and their impact on display color quality for smart phones, tablets, notebooks, desktops, LCD TVs, and projectors.
  • Compare color performance and limitations for various LCD modes like IPS, MVA, FFS
  • Understand the critical factors for HDR displays and wide gamut displays.
  • Understand the advantages of the LED backlight modulation and the principles of quantum dot gamut enhancement for QLED technology.
  • Select the optimal color model for a display and highlight its dependency on display technology.
  • Understand the use of the color model for the display ICC profile and the implication for the color management
  • Follow a live calibration and characterization of an LCD screen and projector used in the class, using tools varying from visual calibrator to instrument based ones.
  • Apply the knowledge from the course to practical problems of color optimization for displays.

Intended Audience: engineers, scientists, managers, pre-press professionals, and those confronting display related color issues.

Gabriel Marcu is senior scientist at Apple Inc. His achievements are in color reproduction on displays and desktop printing (characterization/calibration, halftoning, gamut mapping, ICC profiling, HDR imaging, RAW color conversion). He holds more than 80 issued patents in these areas. Marcu is responsible for color calibration and characterization of Apple desktop display products. He has taught seminars and courses on color topics at various IS&T, SPIE, and SID conferences and IMI Europe. He was co-chair of the 2006 SPIE/IS&T Electronic Imaging Symposium and of CIC11; he is co-chair of the Electronic Imaging Symposium’s Color Imaging Conference: Displaying, Hardcopy, Processing, and Applications. Marcu is an IS&T and SPIE Fellow.

NEW SC04: The Role of Color Science in Smartphone Imaging for Brand Protection and Secure Applications

13:30-15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Alan Hodgson
Level: Innovative Application

The smartphone has the potential to have a profound effect on secure print inspection and authentication and color scientists have a significant role to play in this development. The aim of this course is to identify the opportunities for smartphone imaging in brand protection and secure applications. It focuses on products such as currency, tax stamps, and identity documents and considers imaging of 2D printed plus 3D holographic and optical features. The course concentrates on the imaging of printed products, from present RGB, to the NIR and multispectral future. However, it also shows where this fits in with developments in smartphone biometric authentication. These concepts are illustrated through a number of case studies.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Evaluate the current and potential applications of smartphone imaging in inspection and authentication
  • Have an overview of current secure print vision tools and where smartphones could make a difference.
  • Have a comprehension of the risks and benefits associated with smartphone implementations in secure applications.
  • Identify the power and vulnerabilities of smartphone solutions in this space.
  • Have an understanding of the opportunities that future developments in smartphone imaging—particularly in the use of color science technologies—could bring to document inspection and authentication.

Intended Audience: The course is intended for those interested in the application of color imaging in the broad area of security applications, from 2 perspectives. First, it will be of use to those working in color management to understand how to develop features for smartphone authentication. Second, for those interested in color and multispectral imaging and their application to smartphone imaging in brand protection and secure documents.

This course that assumes no knowledge of secure print authentication. All that is required is an interest in the use of smartphones in this application. It aims to inform an audience ranging from students and engineers to market innovators and academics.

Alan Hodgson has 35 years of experience across the print and imaging industry as an image physicist. He has been involved in security documents for the past 15 years, both within the industry and as an external consultant, teaching courses at security and imaging conferences. Over the last 5 years he has been investigating the applicability of smartphone technology to this industry. Hodgson is a past President of IS&T and a Fellow of both the Institute of Physics and The Royal Photographic Society.

NEW SC05: Variational Color Image Enhancement inspired by Human Vision

15:45-17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Edoardo Provenzi
Level: Advanced

In the last twenty years, variational principles in image processing and computer vision flourished. They allowed a deeper comprehension of important image features and provided more efficient solution to many practical problems. This holds true also for color image processing. The first part of this short course provided a brief qualitative introduction to variational techniques, which is then applied to reinterpret the well-known histogram equalization method. During the second part, how to modify the variational framework of histogram equalization to take into account some basic properties of the human visual system is shown. Results on natural images are presented and discussed.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify a variational technique.
  • Describe histogram equalization in terms of minimization of energy functionals.
  • Summarize the most important phenomenological properties of the human visual system.
  • Combine visual features with variational principles in order to get efficient color enhancement algorithms.
  • Compare different color enhancement techniques within the variational framework.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers with an interest in the basics of color vision and colorimetry

Edoardo Provenzi obtained a master in theoretical physics (2000) from the University of Milan, and a PhD in applied mathematics (2004) from the University of Genoa. Since 2004, he has been studying color vision and processing. He is currently working in these research fields: color science, variational techniques in imaging, statistics of natural images, geometry of color spaces. He worked was an associate professor at the University Paris Descartes (2014-2017). He has been a full professor of applied mathematics in the Image Processing Group at the University of Bordeaux since 2017. He is the author of the book Computational Color Science: Variational Retinex-like Methods (Wiley & Sons Eds.).

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 13, 2018

FOUR-HOUR CLASSES
8:00-12:15

SC06: Advanced Colorimetry and Color Appearance

8:00 – 12:15 (4 hours)
Instructor: Gaurav Sharma, University of Rochester
Level: Introductory

Building on a foundation in basic color science and colorimetry, this course provides attendees a broad understanding of color appearance phenomena and introduces them to color appearance modeling. The relationship of these important color appearance phenomena to the state of adaptation of the human visual system is explained. Students learn the perceptual color attributes of lightness, brightness, colorfulness, saturation, chroma, and hue. The course presents widely-used computational models for evaluating correlates of these attributes. Spatial aspects of color vision are discussed, as well as simple models for spatial color perception.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how changes in the state of visual adaptation affect the perceived appearance of colors.
  • Identify the main elements of a color appearance model and explain the critical role of chromatic adaptation in color appearance.
  • Describe the Von Kries model for chromatic adaptation transformations, and perform computations using the model.
  • Apply the CIECAM02 color appearance model to obtain colorimetric representations for different viewing conditions.
  • Understand how relevant color appearance parameters are determined for real-world viewing environments.
  • Describe the components of commonly-used spatial color appearance models.

Intended Audience: color engineers, research scientists, and software developers involved in design and optimization of color imaging systems, algorithms, and devices. Prior knowledge of fundamental colorimetry is assumed.

Gaurav Sharma has more than two decades of experience in the design and optimization of color imaging systems and algorithms that spans employment at the Xerox Innovation Group and his current position as a professor at the University of Rochester in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. Additionally, he has consulted for several companies on the development of new imaging systems and algorithms. He holds 51 issued patents and has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is the editor of the Digital Color Imaging Handbook (CRC Press) and served as the editor-in-chief for the SPIE/IS&T Journal of Electronic Imaging (2011-2015). Sharma is a fellow of IS&T, IEEE, and SPIE.

SC07: Camera Color Characterization: Theory and Practice

8:00 – 12:15 (4 hours)
Instructors: Dietmar Wueller, Image Engineering GmbH & Co. Kg, and Eric Walowit, consultant
Level: Intermediate

This short course covers the process of colorimetric camera characterization in theory and practice. The need for camera characterization and calibration and the impact on general image quality is first reviewed. Known issues in traditional approaches are discussed. Methodology for building camera colorimetric transforms and profiles are detailed step-by-step. State-of-the-art solutions using current technology are presented including monochromators, multispectral LED light sources, in situ measurements of spectral radiances of natural objects, and modern color transform methods including multidimensional color look up tables. A live demonstration is performed of the end-to-end process of spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display. This short course provides the basis needed to implement advanced color correction in cameras and software.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the need for camera colorimetric characterization and the impact of color calibration on image quality and manufacturing yield.
  • Perform target-based and spectral-based camera characterization.
  • Solve for colorimetric camera transforms and build profiles using linear and nonlinear techniques.
  • Evaluate current colorimetric camera characterization hardware and software technology and products.
  • Participate in hands-on spectral camera characterization, camera transform generation, and matching from capture to display.

Intended Audience: engineers, project leaders, and managers involved in camera image processing pipeline development, image quality engineering, and production-line quality assurance.

Dietmar Wueller studied photographic sciences (1987-1992) in Cologne. He is the founder of Image Engineering, one of the leading suppliers for test equipment for digital image capture devices. Wueller is a member of IS&T, DGPH and ECI, he is the German representative for ISO TC42 WG18 and also participates in several other standardization activities.

Eric Walowit’s interests are in color management, appearance estimation, and image processing pipelines for digital photographic applications. He is founder (retired) of Color Savvy Systems, a color management hardware and software company. He graduated from RIT’s Image Science program in 1985, concentrating in Color Science. Walowit is a member of ICC, ISO TC42, and IS&T.

TWO-HOUR CLASSES
8:00-10:00

SC08: Individual Differences in Color Matching and Chromatic Adaptation

8:00 – 10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: Mark Fairchild, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Individuals are different, by definition. Individuals typically differ in many anatomical and physiological aspects including the sensitivity and scaling of their sensory systems. This course examines individual differences in color matching functions and how they impact fundamentals of colorimetry (XYZ, CIELAB) as well as individual differences in chromatic adaptation that might be caused by higher-level perceptual mechanics and thus impact color appearance (CIECAM02-type metrics). Anatomical and physiological differences that impact color perception are described along with suggestions for dealing with them in practical color measurement. Specific topics will include observer metamerism, categorical color matching functions, observer calibration, statistical models of color matching, uncertainty in adaptation, individual differences in corresponding colors, chromatic adaptation hysteresis, and improving practical adaptation models.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain observed individual differences in color perception.
  • Identify the physiological and anatomical differences in the visual system.
  • Compute individual color matching functions based on a physiological model.
  • Predict differences in chromatic adaptation and their level of importance.
  • Define the impact of individual differences on their own color applications.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers who use colorimetric and color appearance models in their work and are interested in the fundamental components of our human visual system that impact the accuracy, precision, and individual applicability of such systems and anyone with an interest in color science.

Mark Fairchild is professor and founding head of the Integrated Sciences Academy in Rochester Institute of Technology’s College of Science and director of the Program of Color Science and Munsell Color Science Laboratory. He has a BS and MS in imaging science and PhD in vision science. He is a Fellow of IS&T and OSA. Fairchild received the Davies Medal (RPS) for contributions to photography and the IS&T Bowman award for excellence in education.

SC09: Fundamentals of Psychophysics

8:00-10:00 (2 hours)
Instructor: James A. Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Psychophysical methods from experimental psychology can be used to quantify the relationships between the physical properties of the world and the qualities people perceive. The results of psychophysical experiments can be used to create models of human perception that can guide the development of effective color imaging algorithms and enabling interfaces. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of psychophysics and teaches attendees how to develop experiments that can be used to advance color imaging research and applications. Hands-on examples are used throughout so that attendees understand how to design and run their own experiments, analyze the results, and develop perceptually-based algorithms and applications.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identifydentify the major techniques for measuring perceptual thresholds and scales.
  • Design perception experiments using these techniques.
  • Analyze the data from these experiments to derive perceptual metrics.
  • Apply these metrics to practical problems in color imaging

 Intended Audience: students and professionals who want to be able to interpret the results of perception psychology experiments and develop their own perception studies. The course assumes a basic level understanding of issues in color and imaging science, engineering, and statistics. No specific knowledge of perception psychology is required. All relevant concepts are introduced in the class.

James A. Ferwerda is an associate professor and the Xerox Chair in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received a BA in psychology, MS in computer graphics, and a PhD in experimental psychology, all from Cornell University. The focus of his research is on building computational models of human vision from psychophysical experiments, and developing advanced imaging systems based on these models.

TWO-HOUR CLASSES
10:15-12:15

SC10: Fundamentals of Spectral Measurements for Color Science

10:15-12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: David R. Wyble
Level: Introductory

This class begins by defining the basic terms surrounding the instruments and quantities used in spectral measurements in the color field. We then cover the operation and construction of spectrophotometers and spectroradiometers by discussing the function of each of the various subsystems present in the devices. Instrument standardization (calibration) and the application of CIE geometries for reflectance and transmittance is covered. To evaluate instruments, the concepts of precision and accuracy of measurement devices is introduced along with practical suggestions for the analysis of instrument performance. The overall goal is to fully understand the procedures and concepts that lead to proper spectral measurements that are the basis for colorimetric calculations.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the components of spectrophotometers and spectroradiometers and the functions of each,
  • Define the standardization (calibration) process of spectrophotometers and understand the implications of standardization upon the measurement process,
  • Interpret measurement requirements and select appropriate measurement parameters and geometries for various applications, and
  • Understand the point of “hand-off” from spectral measurements to colorimetric calculations.

Intended Audience: color engineers and technologists responsible for making and interpreting color measurements of any type. A technical background is not required, although an understanding of basic scientific principles will be very helpful.

David R. Wyble is president and founder of Avian Rochester, LLC. Since 2011, Avian Rochester has been delivering color standards; traditional and custom measurements; and consulting services to the color industry. Prior to founding Avian Rochester, Wyble was a color scientist within the Munsell Color Science Laboratory, at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and before that a Member of Research & Technology Staff at Xerox Corp. He holds a BS in Computer Science and MS and PhD in Color Science from RIT and Chiba University, respectively.

REVISED FOR 2018 SC11: Colour Difference Perception for Images

10:15-12:15 (2 hours)
Instructor: Ming Ronnier Luo, Zhejiang University, University of Leeds, and National Taiwan University of Science and Technology
Level: Introductory

This course is divided into two parts: color difference evaluation for color patches and image. The former covers the fundamentals in understanding various uniform color spaces including CIELAB, CAM16-UCS, the latest Jzazbz for HDR and WCG applications, color difference formulas such as BFD, CIE94, CIEDE2000, color difference datasets, and evaluation of color difference formulas. The latter introduces the metrics for evaluating images such as conventional formulas with add-on spatial filters or lightness weighting factor, and image appearance model. Furthermore, some extensions of conventional formulas to predict parametric effect, such as change of viewing conditions on background, gap and color difference magnitudes.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain the techniques for visually assessing color difference
  • Understand different types of color difference formulae
  • Evaluate their respective performances
  • Apply color difference formula in the imaging industry

Intended Audience: color engineers and research scientists involved with color reproduction, imaging device developers, computer software developers. Knowledge of the fundamental colorimetry is assumed.

Ming Ronnier Luo is a global expert professor at the College of Optical Science and engineering, Zhejiang University, China and a visiting professor at the University of Leeds (UK) and National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei. He is a vice president of CIE and has more than 600 publications in color and imaging science and illumination technology. He is a Fellow of IS&T and the Society of Dyers and Colourists, and is the recipient of the AIC Judd award (2017).

 

TWO-HOUR CLASSES
13:30-15:30

REVISED FOR 2018 SC12: From Cone Fundamentals to Color Matching Functions to Cone-opponent, Camera Sensor, and Device Color Spaces

13:30-15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Andrew Stockman, UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
Level: Introductory

This course is a development of the previous course “Cone fundamentals, color matching functions, luminous efficiency, and individual differences.” The course, as before, begins with the trichromacy of human color vision, which depends on the spectral sensitivities of the long-, middle- and short-wavelength-sensitive (L, M, and S) cones. These functions are the “fundamental” color matching functions (CMFs) upon which human color matches depend and from which all other CMFs should be linearly transformed. The CIE TC 1-36 “physiologically-relevant” LMS and XYZ international standard for colorimetry, based on Stockman & Sharpe (2000), will be covered in detail. The revised course goes beyond these CMFs to consider postreceptoral cone-opponent color spaces (L-M, [L+M]-S), camera sensor, and display device color spaces.

Benefits: this course enables an attendee to understand the:

  • Understand the basics of phototransduction and how it relates to univariance and to cone spectral sensitivities.
  • Learn about the determination of cone spectral sensitivities in normal and color deficient observers.
  • Appreciate the relationship of cone spectral sensitivities to RGB color matching functions.
  • Observe the relationship of cone spectral sensitivities to luminous efficiency functions and the determination of luminous efficiency.
  • Appreciate the relationship of of LMS cone spectral sensitivities to XYZ color matching functions and the derivation of the new physiologically-relevant CIE TC 1-36 XYZ CMFs.
  • Learn how to adjust standard cone spectral sensitivities to take into account individual differences, and field size.
  • Understand cone-opponent color spaces; camera sensor color spaces; and device color spaces.

Intended Audience: scientists and engineers with an interest in the basics of color vision and colorimetry, and the application of the new CIE TC 1-36 “physiologically-relevant” international standard.

Andrew Stockman is the Steers Professor at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology. His research areas include color vision, rod vision, visual adaptation, and temporal sensitivity. He may be best known for his work with Ted Sharpe on spectral sensitivities and luminous efficiency. He is the principal author of the widely-used colour database at http://www.cvrl.org. He received the Colour Group Newton medal (2016) and the Inter-Society Color Council Macbeth Award (2018).

SC13: The Art of Making Better Pixels: High Dynamic Range Display Concepts and Technologies

13:30-15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Timo Kunkel, Dolby Laboratories, Inc.
Level: Introductory

The field of High Dynamic Range imaging or ‘HDR’ was coined more than 20 years ago and has been evolving ever since. Over time, various building blocks have been designed that are suitable to form perceptually-correct, artistically-compelling, and technologically-efficient HDR imaging systems. Now, as those technologies are implemented into an increasing number of mainstream devices, it is important keep track of several key perceptual and technological concepts in order to avoid pitfalls that can impact image fidelity when processing, transmitting, and displaying HDR imagery. This course is intended as an introduction into HDR display systems and its related imaging pipelines.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand how the human visual system perceives the physical world around us and how HDR display technologies cater to this.
  • Assess how we can display a plausible depiction of the ‘real’ physical world and how we convey artistic intent.
  • Identify the importance of a display’s white and black levels, its tone response curve, and quantization steps as well as its color volume.
  • Explain the fundamentals of common HDR and Wide Color Gamut display technologies such as full array dual modulation, OLED, and Quantum Dot based display.
  • Differentiate the considerations for creating compelling content that lives up to the capabilities of HDR displays

Intended Audience: it is aimed at anyone working in image display related fields such as display design, content creation, image transport and broadcast, and vision science. No direct previous knowledge is required, but a basic understanding of traditional display and imaging concepts is beneficial.

Timo Kunkel is a senior color and imaging researcher at Dolby Labs. His main areas of interest are perception-based color models and HDR display technologies and has published numerous papers in this field. In the recent years he has also been working on metrological concepts for HDR displays. He received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Bristol (UK) and a MSc in Physical Geosciences from the University of Freiburg (Germany).

NEW SC14: Color Fundamentals in LED Lighting

13:30-15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Mike Murdoch, Rochester Institute of Technology
Level: Intermediate

Color is one of the most important attributes of lighting, whether for general illumination at home, commercial applications in retail and healthcare, or special applications like cinematography. LED technology has opened up enormous flexibility in the design of lighting systems while simultaneously increasing energy efficiency. The flexibility of LED is both an opportunity and a curse: designs can maximize quality of light and preference for object color rendition or—if not done well—drastically distort object colors. This course explains the ways that color, color rendition, and quality of light can be affected in LED, as well as OLED, lighting. It explores the different ways systems produce white light, including variations in correlated color temperature and spectral power distribution. Traditional and recent measures of efficacy and color rendition are explained; situations where measures remain insufficient are discussed.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Explain different LED color architectures, including RGB, RGBA, phosphor-converted blue pump, tunable white, and warm-dim systems.
  • Understand how spectral characteristics of “white” LEDs affect rendered object colors, and what this means for perceived naturalness and preference.
  • Understand multi-primary solution approaches for creating spectral power distributions from discrete LEDs with different optimization goals.
  • Apply and compare color rendition measures including CIE Ra, CIE Rf, TM-30 Rf/Rg.
  • Evaluate spectral power distributions of light for different applications.

Intended Audience: Scientists, engineers, and students using or interested in LED lighting systems for research, image capture, or image/product evaluation. Basic knowledge of colorimetry is assumed, but no specialized knowledge of lighting is expected

Mike Murdoch is an assistant professor in Rochester Institute of Technology’s Munsell Color Science Laboratory, where he teaches psychophysical methods, MATLAB programming, and lighting perception topics. His current research includes the effects of temporally dynamic lighting on visual adaptation and perceived rate of change, inter-observer effects on lighting color rendition, and color appearance and visual adaptation in augmented/mixed reality (AR/MR). Murdoch has deep experience with color perception and system design for solid state lighting, LCD, and OLED displays, rooted in industrial work at Kodak Research and Philips Research. He has co-authored more than 28 journal and conference papers and 18 patents, and he served as the general chair of CIC25 in Lillehammer. His education includes a BS in chemical engineering from Cornell, MS in computer science from RIT, and PhD in human-technology interaction from Eindhoven University of Technology (the Netherlands).

SC15: Color Image Quality Assessment

13:30-15:30 (2 hours)
Instructors: Marius Pedersen and Seyed Ali Amirshahi, Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory (NTNU)
Level: Intermediate

This short course provides an overview of the current state of color image quality assessment. It introduces the core functions used in objective color image quality, including models of the human visual system and how pixel error maps can be converted to single quality numbers. Furthermore, it presents the most common methods, as well as promising new methods for quality assessment. Also discussed are methods for conducting psychophysical experiments to evaluate specific aspects of image quality and how these results are used to evaluate the performance of objective image quality metrics. The course also focuses on how to identify a set of key image quality attributes and to compute these as a set of distinct metrics for evaluating image quality.

Benefits: Attendees will be able to:

  • Understand the basic characteristics of the human visual system.
  • Understand methods for conducting psychophysical experiments to subjectively assess image quality.
  • Be familiar with the major image quality metrics in use today and how to evaluate their performance.
  • Understand methods for pooling the results of spatial image quality maps to yield a single-number assessment of overall image quality and generate spider-plots and interpret results from image quality assessment.
  • Understand what the major image quality attributes are, what they measure, and how they are computed.
  • Be familiar with image quality assessment in different applications.

Intended Audience: scientists, engineers, analysts, and managers involved in the design, engineering, manufacturing, marketing, or evaluation of imaging and printing products, algorithms, or systems. Participants should be familiar with the function and basic properties of imaging systems. A rudimentary knowledge of color science linear systems, and image processing is helpful, but not essential.

Marius Pedersen is professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. His work is centered on image quality assessment; he has more than 60 publications in this field. He received his PhD in color imaging (2011) from the University of Oslo. He is currently the head of the computer science group in Gjøvik in the department of computer science, as well as the head of the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory, both at NTNU.

Seyed Ali Amirshahi is a Marie Curie post-doctoral Fellow in the Norwegian Colour and Visual Computing Laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His research is mainly focused on different aspects of image and video quality assessment and computational aesthetics. He received his PhD from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany (2015). Prior to joining NTNU, he was a post-doctoral Fellow at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California.

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