13 - 17  January, 2019 • Burlingame, California USA

Monday January 14, 2019

10:10 – 10:40 AM Coffee Break

Human and Machine Perception 3D Shapes

Session Chair: Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States)
10:40 – 11:40 AM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

HVEI-200
KEYNOTE: Human and machine perception of 3D shape from contour, James Elder, York University (Canada)

James Elder is a Professor and York Research Chair in human and computer vision at York University, Toronto, Canada. He is jointly appointed to the department of psychology and the department of electrical engineering & computer science at York, and is a member of York’s Centre for Vision Research (CVR) and Vision: Science to Applications (VISTA) program. He is also Director of the NSERC CREATE Training Program in Data Analytics & Visualization (NSERC CREATE DAV) and Principal Investigator of the Intelligent Systems for Sustainable Urban Mobility (ISSUM) project. His research seeks to improve machine vision systems through a better understanding of visual processing in biological systems. Dr. Elder’s current research is focused on natural scene statistics, perceptual organization, contour processing, shape perception, single-view 3D reconstruction, attentive vision systems and machine vision systems for dynamic 3D urban awareness.




Medical Imaging - Perception I

Session Chair: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan)
11:40 AM – 12:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

This is the first of several medical imaging sessions throughout the week.


HVEI-225
Do different radiologists perceive medical images the same way? Some insights from Representational Similarity Analysis (Invited), Jay Hegde, Augusta University (United States)



12:30 – 2:00 PM Lunch

Monday Plenary

2:00 – 3:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom D

Autonomous Driving Technology and the OrCam MyEye, Amnon Shashua, President & CEO, Mobileye, an Intel Company, and Senior Vice President of Intel Corporation (United States)

The field of transportation is undergoing a seismic change with the coming introduction of autonomous driving. The technologies required to enable computer driven cars involves the latest cutting edge artificial intelligence algorithms along three major thrusts: Sensing, Planning and Mapping. Prof. Shashua will describe the challenges and the kind of computer vision and machine learning algorithms involved, but will do that through the perspective of Mobileye's activity in this domain. He will then describe how OrCam leverages computer vision, situation awareness and language processing to enable Blind and Visually impaired to interact with the world through a miniature wearable device.

Prof. Amnon Shashua holds the Sachs chair in computer science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His field of expertise is computer vision and machine learning. For his academic achievements he received the MARR prize Honorable Mention in 2001, the Kaye innovation award in 2004, and the Landau award in exact sciences in 2005.

In 1999 Prof. Shashua co-founded Mobileye, an Israeli company developing a system-on-chip and computer vision algorithms for a driving assistance system, providing a full range of active safety features using a single camera. Today, approximately 24 million cars rely on Mobileye technology to make their vehicles safer to drive. In August 2014, Mobileye claimed the title for largest Israeli IPO ever, by raising $1B at a market cap of $5.3B. In addition, Mobileye is developing autonomous driving technology with more than a dozen car manufacturers. The introduction of autonomous driving capabilities is of a transformative nature and has the potential of changing the way cars are built, driven and own in the future. In August 2017, Mobileye became an Intel company in the largest Israeli acquisition deal ever of $15.3B. Today, Prof. Shashua is the President and CEO of Mobileye and a Senior Vice President of Intel Corporation leading Intel's Autonomous Driving Group.

In 2010 Prof. Shashua co-founded OrCam which harnesses computer vision and artificial intelligence to assist people who are visually impaired or blind. The OrCam MyEye device is unique in its ability to provide visual aid to hundreds of millions of people, through a discreet wearable platform. Within its wide-ranging scope of capabilities, OrCam's device can read most texts (both indoors and outdoors) and learn to recognize thousands of new items and faces.


3:00 – 3:30 PM Coffee Break

Symmetry in Vision and Image Processing

Session Chair: Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
3:30 – 4:30 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

HVEI-201
KEYNOTE: The role of symmetry in vision and image processing, Zygmunt Pizlo, University of California, Irvine (United States)

Professor Zygmunt Pizlo holds the Falmagne Endowed Chair in mathematical psychology in the department of cognitive sciences at University of California-Irvine. Pizlo received his MSc in electrical engineering (in 1978) from Politechnika, Warsaw, Poland, and PhD in electrical engineering (in 1982) from the Institute of Electron Technology, Warsaw, Poland. He then decided to pursue his interests in, and passion for natural sciences. Having been already exposed to elements of AI, he became absolutely fascinated with the possibility of studying the human mind. In 1982, he started his research on human vision at the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology in the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. Delving into visual psychophysics as the most mature branch of experimental psychology, Pizlo received his PhD in psychology from the University of Maryland at College Park. Bob Steinman and Azriel Rosenfeld were his advisers. In 1988, he moved to the University of Maryland in College Park, MD where he received his PhD in Psychology (in 1991). He was a professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University for 26 years. In 2017, he moved to UC Irvine. Dr. Pizlo’s research focuses on psychophysics and computational modeling of 3D shape perception. He authored and co-authored two books on shape (MIT Press, 2008 and Oxford University Press, 2014) and co-edited a book on shape perception in human and computer vision (Springer, 2013). His interest in vision research extends to depth, motion, figure-ground, color, eye movement, as well as image and video processing. He has also done work on human problem solving where he adapted multiresolution/multiscale pyramids used in visual models to solve combinatorial optimization problems such as the Traveling Salesman Problem. Most recently, he has been exploring the role that symmetry and the least-action principle can play in a theoretical formalism that can explain Perception and Cognition.


End of Day Discussion (Monday)

Moderators: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); and Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
4:30 – 5:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

Please join us for a lively discussion of today's presentations. Participate in an interactive, moderated discussion, where key topics and questions are discussed from many perspectives, reflecting the diverse HVEI community.



5:00 – 6:00 PM All-Conference Welcome Reception

Tuesday January 15, 2019

7:30 – 8:45 AM Women in Electronic Imaging Breakfast

Material Appearance Perception

Session Chairs: Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States) and Ingeborg Tastl, HP Labs, HP Inc. (United States)
9:10 – 10:10 AM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom D

This session is jointly sponsored by: Human Vision and Electronic Imaging 2019, and Material Appearance 2019.


9:10MAAP-202
Material appearance: Ordering and clustering, Davit Gigilashvili, Jean-Baptiste Thomas, Marius Pedersen, and Jon Yngve Hardeberg, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)

9:30MAAP-203
A novel translucency classification for computer graphics, Morgane Gerardin1, Lionel Simonot2, Jean-Philippe Farrugia3, Jean-Claude Iehl3, Thierry Fournel4, and Mathieu Hebert4; 1Institut d'Optique Graduate School, 2Université de Poitiers, 3LIRIS, and 4Université Jean Monnet de Saint Etienne (France)

9:50MAAP-204
Constructing glossiness perception model of computer graphics with sounds, Takumi Nakamura, Keita Hirai, and Takahiko Horiuchi, Chiba University (Japan)



10:00 AM – 7:30 PM Industry Exhibition

10:10 – 10:50 AM Coffee Break

Vision Potpourri: Eye Movements, Eyeballs & Colors

Session Chair: Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States)
10:50 AM – 12:10 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

10:50HVEI-205
Object-based and multi-frame motion information predict human eye movement patterns during video viewing, Zheng Ma1, Jiaxin Wu2, Sheng-hua Zhong2, and Stephen Heinen1; 1The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States) and 2Shenzhen University (China)

11:10HVEI-206
Discovery of activities via statistical clustering of fixation patterns, Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)

11:30HVEI-207
Investigation of the effect of pupil diameter on visual acuity using a neuro-physiological model of the human eye, Csilla Timár-Fülep and Gábor Erdei, Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Hungary)

11:50HVEI-208
What is the opposite of blue?: The language of colour wheels (JPI-pending), Neil Dodgson, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand)



12:30 – 2:00 PM Lunch

Tuesday Plenary

2:00 – 3:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom D

The Quest for Vision Comfort: Head-Mounted Light Field Displays for Virtual and Augmented Reality, Hong Hua, Professor of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona (United States)

Hong Hua will discuss the high promises and the tremendous progress made recently toward the development of head-mounted displays (HMD) for both virtual and augmented reality displays, developing HMDs that offer uncompromised optical pathways to both digital and physical worlds without encumbrance and discomfort confronts many grand challenges, both from technological perspectives and human factors. She will particularly focus on the recent progress, challenges and opportunities for developing head-mounted light field displays (LF-HMD), which are capable of rendering true 3D synthetic scenes with proper focus cues to stimulate natural eye accommodation responses and address the well-known vergence-accommodation conflict in conventional stereoscopic displays.

Dr. Hong Hua is a Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. With over 25 years of experience, Dr. Hua is widely recognized through academia and industry as an expert in wearable display technologies and optical imaging and engineering in general. Dr. Hua’s current research focuses on optical technologies enabling advanced 3D displays, especially head-mounted display technologies for virtual reality and augmented reality applications, and microscopic and endoscopic imaging systems for medicine. Dr. Hua has published over 200 technical papers and filed a total of 23 patent applications in her specialty fields, and delivered numerous keynote addresses and invited talks at major conferences and events worldwide. She is an SPIE Fellow and OSA senior member. She was a recipient of NSF Career Award in 2006 and honored as UA Researchers @ Lead Edge in 2010. Dr. Hua and her students shared a total of 8 “Best Paper” awards in various IEEE, SPIE and SID conferences. Dr. Hua received her Ph.D. degree in Optical Engineering from the Beijing Institute of Technology in China in 1999. Prior to joining the UA faculty in 2003, Dr. Hua was an Assistant Professor with the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2003, was a Beckman Research Fellow at the Beckman Institute of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign between 1999 and 2002, and was a post-doc at the University of Central Florida in 1999.


3:00 – 3:30 PM Coffee Break

Computational Models for Human Optics

Session Chair: Jennifer Gille, Oculus VR (United States)
3:30 – 5:30 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom D

This session is jointly sponsored by the EI Steering Committee.


3:30EISS-704
Eye model implementation: Tools for modeling human visual optics (Invited), Andrew Watson, Apple Inc. (United States)

Dr. Andrew Watson is the Chief Vision Scientist at Apple, Inc. in Cupertino, California. In that position he leads the application of vision science to a broad range of Apple technologies, applications, devices and displays. Dr. Watson was an undergraduate at Columbia University and received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. He subsequently held postdoctoral positions at the University of Cambridge in England and at Stanford University in California. From 1982 to 2016 he was the Senior Scientist for Vision Research at NASA Ames Research Center in California. He is the author of over 100 scientific papers, and he has seven patents, in areas such as acuity measurement, image compression, video quality, and measurement of display artifacts. He has 17748 citations and an h-index of 58. In 1990, he received NASA’s H. Julian Allen Award, and in 1993 he was appointed Ames Associate Fellow for exceptional scientific achievement. In 2011, he received the Presidential Rank Award from the President of the United States.

3:50EISS-700
Wide field-of-view optical model of the human eye (Invited), James Polans, Verily Life Sciences (United States)

Dr. James Polans is an engineer who works on surgical robotics at Verily Life Sciences in South San Francisco. Dr. Polans received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Duke University under the mentorship of Joseph Izatt. His doctoral work explored the design and development of wide field-of-view optical coherence tomography systems for retinal imaging. He also has a M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

4:10EISS-702
Evolution of the Arizona Eye Model (Invited), Jim Schwiegerling, University of Arizona (United States)

Prof. Jim Schwiegerling is a Professor in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. His research interests include the design of ophthalmic systems such as corneal topographers, ocular wavefront sensors and retinal imaging systems. In addition to these systems, Dr. Schwiegerling has designed a variety of multifocal intraocular and contact lenses and has expertise in diffractive and extended depth of focus systems.

4:30EISS-705
Berkeley Eye Model (Invited), Brian Barsky, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

Prof. Brian Barsky is Professor of Computer Science and Affiliate Professor of Optometry and Vision Science at UC Berkeley. He attended McGill University, Montréal, received a DCS in engineering and a BSc in mathematics and computer science. He studied computer graphics and computer science at Cornell University, Ithaca, where he earned an MS degree. His PhD is in computer science from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry. His research interests include computer aided geometric design and modeling, interactive three-dimensional computer graphics, visualization in scientific computing, computer aided cornea modeling and visualization, medical imaging, and virtual environments for surgical simulation.

4:50EISS-701
Modeling retinal image formation for light field displays (Invited), Hekun Huang, Mohan Xu, and Hong Hua, University of Arizona (United States)

Prof. Hong Hua is a Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. With over 25 years of experience, Dr. Hua is widely recognized through academia and industry as an expert in wearable display technologies and optical imaging and engineering in general. Dr. Hua’s current research focuses on optical technologies enabling advanced 3D displays, especially head-mounted display technologies for virtual reality and augmented reality applications, and microscopic and endoscopic imaging systems for medicine. Dr. Hua has published over 200 technical papers and filed a total of 23 patent applications in her specialty fields, and delivered numerous keynote addresses and invited talks at major conferences and events worldwide. She is an SPIE Fellow and OSA senior member. She was a recipient of NSF Career Award in 2006 and honored as UA Researchers @ Lead Edge in 2010. Dr. Hua and her students shared a total of 8 “Best Paper” awards in various IEEE, SPIE and SID conferences. Dr. Hua received her Ph.D. degree in Optical Engineering from the Beijing Institute of Technology in China in 1999. Prior to joining the UA faculty in 2003, Dr. Hua was an Assistant Professor with the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2003, was a Beckman Research Fellow at the Beckman Institute of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign between 1999 and 2002, and was a post-doc at the University of Central Florida in 1999.

5:10EISS-703
Ray-tracing 3D spectral scenes through human optics (Invited), Trisha Lian, Kevin MacKenzie, and Brian Wandell, Stanford University (United States)

Trisha Lian is an Electrical Engineering PhD student at Stanford University. Before Stanford, she received her bachelor’s in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University. She is currently advised by Professor Brian Wandell and works on interdisciplinary topics that involve image systems simulations. These range from novel camera designs to simulations of the human visual system.


End of Day Discussion (Tuesday)

Moderators: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); and Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
5:30 – 6:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

Please join us for a lively discussion of today's presentations. Participate in an interactive, moderated discussion, where key topics and questions are discussed from many perspectives, reflecting the diverse HVEI community.


5:30 – 7:30 PM Symposium Demonstration Session



Wednesday January 16, 2019

Models of Perception

Session Chairs: Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States) and Bernice Rogowitz, Visual Perspectives and Columbia University (United States)
9:10 – 10:10 AM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

9:10HVEI-209
On the role of edge orientation in stereo vision, Alfredo Restrepo and Julian Quiroga, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Colombia)

9:30HVEI-210
Neurocomputational lightness model explains the perception of real surfaces viewed under Gelb illumination, Michael Rudd, University of Washington (United States)

9:50HVEI-211
Accelerated cue combination for multi-cue depth perception, Christopher Tyler, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States)



10:00 AM – 3:30 PM Industry Exhibition

10:10 – 10:50 AM Coffee Break

Perceived Image Quality

Session Chairs: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan) and Andrew Watson, Apple Inc. (United States)
10:50 AM – 12:10 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

10:50HVEI-212
A visual model for predicting chromatic banding artifacts, Gyorgy Denes, George Ash, and Rafal Mantiuk, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

11:10HVEI-213
NARVAL: A no-reference video quality tool for real-time communications, Augustin Lemesle1,2, Alexis Marion1,3, Ludovic Roux1, and Alexandre Gouaillard1; 1CoSMo Software (Singapore), 2Centrale Supelec (France), and 3Centrale Marseille (France)

11:30HVEI-214
An improved objective metric to predict image quality using deep neural networks, Pinar Akyazi and Touradj Ebrahimi, EPFL (Switzerland)

11:50HVEI-215
Analyze and predict the perceptibility of UHD video contents, Steve Göring, Julian Zebelein, Simon Wedel, Dominik Keller, and Alexander Raake, Technische University Ilmenau (Germany)



12:30 – 2:00 PM Lunch

Wednesday Plenary

2:00 – 3:00 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom D

Light Fields and Light Stages for Photoreal Movies, Games, and Virtual Reality, Paul Debevec, Senior Scientist, Google (United States)

Paul Debevec will discuss the technology and production processes behind "Welcome to Light Fields", the first downloadable virtual reality experience based on light field capture techniques which allow the visual appearance of an explorable volume of space to be recorded and reprojected photorealistically in VR enabling full 6DOF head movement. The lightfields technique differs from conventional approaches such as 3D modelling and photogrammetry. Debevec will discuss the theory and application of the technique. Debevec will also discuss the Light Stage computational illumination and facial scanning systems which use geodesic spheres of inward-pointing LED lights as have been used to create digital actor effects in movies such as Avatar, Benjamin Button, and Gravity, and have recently been used to create photoreal digital actors based on real people in movies such as Furious 7, Blade Runner: 2049, and Ready Player One. Th lighting reproduction process of light stages allows omnidirectional lighting environments captured from the real world to be accurately reproduced in a studio, and has recently be extended with multispectral capabilities to enable LED lighting to accurately mimic the color rendition properties of daylight, incandescent, and mixed lighting environments. They have also recently used their full-body light stage in conjunction with natural language processing and automultiscopic video projection to record and project interactive conversations with survivors of the World War II Holocaust.

Paul Debevec is a Senior Scientist at Google VR, a member of GoogleVR's Daydream team, and Adjunct Research Professor of Computer Science in the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, working within the Vision and Graphics Laboratory at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies. Debevec's computer graphics research has been recognized with ACM SIGGRAPH's first Significant New Researcher Award in 2001 for "Creative and Innovative Work in the Field of Image-Based Modeling and Rendering", a Scientific and Engineering Academy Award in 2010 for "the design and engineering of the Light Stage capture devices and the image-based facial rendering system developed for character relighting in motion pictures" with Tim Hawkins, John Monos, and Mark Sagar, and the SMPTE Progress Medal in 2017 in recognition of his achievements and ongoing work in pioneering techniques for illuminating computer-generated objects based on measurement of real-world illumination and their effective commercial application in numerous Hollywood films. In 2014, he was profiled in The New Yorker magazine's "Pixel Perfect: The Scientist Behind the Digital Cloning of Actors" article by Margaret Talbot.


3:00 – 3:30 PM Coffee Break

Immersive QoE

Session Chairs: Kjell Brunnström, RISE Acreo AB (Sweden) and Stuart Perry, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)
3:30 – 5:10 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

This session is jointly sponsored by: Human Vision and Electronic Imaging 2019, and Image Quality and System Performance XVI.


3:30HVEI-216
Complexity measurement and characterization of 360-degree content, Francesca De Simone1, Jesús Gutiérrez2, and Patrick Le Callet2; 1CWI (the Netherlands) and 2Université de Nantes (France)

3:50HVEI-217
Using 360 VR video to improve the learning experience in veterinary medicine university degree, Esther Guervós1, Jaime Jesús Ruiz2, Pablo Perez2, Juan Alberto Muñoz1, César Díaz3, and Narciso Garcia3; 1Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 2Nokia Bell Labs, and 3Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain)

4:10HVEI-218
Quality of Experience of visual-haptic interaction in a virtual reality simulator, Kjell Brunnström1,2, Elijs Dima2, Mattias Andersson2, Mårten Sjöström2, Tahir Qureshi3, and Mathias Johanson4; 1RISE Acreo AB, 2Mid Sweden University, 3HIAB AB, and 4Alkit Communications AB (Sweden)

4:30HVEI-219
Impacts of internal HMD playback processing on subjective quality perception, Frank Hofmeyer, Stephan Fremerey, Thaden Cohrs, and Alexander Raake, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany)

4:50IQSP-220
Are people pixel-peeping 360° videos?, Stephan Fremerey1, Rachel Huang2, and Alexander Raake1; 1Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany) and 2Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. (China)



End of Day Discussion (Wednesday)

Moderators: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); and Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
5:10 – 5:30 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

Please join us for a lively discussion of today's presentations. Participate in an interactive, moderated discussion, where key topics and questions are discussed from many perspectives, reflecting the diverse HVEI community.



5:30 – 7:00 PM Symposium Interactive Papers (Poster) Session

HVEI Banquet and Speaker: Dr. Jacqueline C. Snow

Hosts: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); and Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
7:00 – 10:00 PM
Offsite - details provided with registration

Join us for a wonderful evening of conversations, a banquet dinner, and an enlightening speaker. This banquet is associated with the Human Vision and Electronic Imaging Conference (HVEI), but everyone interested in research at the intersection of human perception/cognition, imaging technologies, and art is welcome. Details coming soon. Note, please sign up for the Banquet when you register.


HVEI-221
KEYNOTE: ‘WonkaVision’ and the need for a paradigm shift in vision research, Jacqueline Snow, University of Nevada at Reno (United States)

Jacqueline Snow joined the cognitive and brain sciences group in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno in fall 2013. She completed her graduate training in clinical neuropsychology and cognitive neuroscience at the University of Melbourne, Australia, under the supervision of professor Jason Mattingley. Snow completed two years of post-doctoral research in the United Kingdom working with professor Glyn Humphreys of University of Birmingham. During this time, she developed a strong interest in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). She subsequently moved to Canada where she completed a further five years of post-doctoral research in the laboratories of professors Jody Culham and Melvyn Goodale at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, she developed a range of special fMRI techniques to study how objects are represented in the human brain. Now an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, Snow teaches undergraduate psychology students about the theory and practice of science, and graduate student seminars in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and clinical neuropsychology. She also heads a research laboratory that consists of four doctoral students and a group of Honors Program students and undergraduate trainees. Together, they examine how humans recognize and make decisions about objects. They are particularly interested in studying the behavioral significance of real-world 3-D objects that one can reach out and interact with, such as tools and snack foods, and how neural structures in the brain code and represent action-relevant information. Other research topics include how object information is integrated across sensory modalities, such as vision and touch. They use a range of methodological approaches, including fMRI, psychophysics and the study of neuropsychological patients with brain damage. The lab is supported by a pilot project grant from the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE).


Thursday January 17, 2019

Medical Imaging - Computational

Session Chair: David Castañón, Boston University (United States)
8:50 – 10:10 AM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

This medical imaging session is jointly sponsored by: Computational Imaging XVII, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging 2019, and Imaging and Multimedia Analytics in a Web and Mobile World 2019.


8:50IMAWM-145
Smart fetal care, Jane You1, Qin Li2, Qiaozhu Chen3, Zhenhua Guo4, and Hongbo Yang5; 1The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong), 2Shenzhen Institute of Information Technology (China), 3Guangzhou Women and Children Medical Center (China), 4Tsinghua University (China), and 5Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

9:10COIMG-146
Self-contained, passive, non-contact, photoplethysmography: Real-time extraction of heart rates from live view within a Canon Powershot, Henry Dietz, Chadwick Parrish, and Kevin Donohue, University of Kentucky (United States)

9:30COIMG-147
Edge-preserving total variation regularization for dual-energy CT images, Sandamali Devadithya and David Castañón, Boston University (United States)

9:50COIMG-148
Fully automated dental panoramic radiograph by using internal mandible curves of dental volumetric CT, Sanghun Lee1, Seongyoun Woo1, Joonwoo Lee2, Jaejun Seo2, and Chulhee Lee1; 1Yonsei University and 2Dio Implant (Republic of Korea)





10:10 – 10:50 AM Coffee Break

Medical Imaging - Perception II

Session Chairs: Sos Agaian, CUNY/ The College of Staten Island (United States) and Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States)
10:50 AM – 12:10 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

This medical imaging session is jointly sponsored by: Human Vision and Electronic Imaging 2019, and Image Processing: Algorithms and Systems XVII.


10:50IPAS-222
Specular reflection detection algorithm for endoscopic images, Viacheslav Voronin1, Evgeny Semenishchev1, and Sos Agaian2; 1Don State Technical University (Russian Federation) and 2CUNY/ The College of Staten Island (United States)

11:10IPAS-223
Feedback alfa-rooting algorithm for medical image enhancement, Viacheslav Voronin1, Evgeny Semenishchev1, and Sos Agaian2; 1Don State Technical University (Russian Federation) and 2CUNY/ The College of Staten Island (United States)

11:30HVEI-224
Observer classification images and efficiency in 2D and 3D search tasks (Invited), Craig Abbey, Miguel Lago, and Miguel Eckstein, University of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

11:50HVEI-226
Image recognition depends largely on variety (Invited), Tamara Haygood1, Christina Thomas2, Tara Sagebiel2, Diana Palacio2, Myrna Godoy2, and Karla Evans1; 1University of York (United Kingdom) and 2UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (United States)



12:30 – 1:50 PM Lunch

The Art of Science: The ‘Magic Eyes’ of Christopher Tyler, Part 1

Session Chair: Lora Likova, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States)
1:50 – 3:20 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

While long-standing HVEI committee member, Christopher Tyler, shows no signs of retiring, his attainment of his 75th year, and his seminal contributions ranging from binocular vision and stereopsis through art and consciousness to brain mechanisms and brain imaging, are certainly deserving of recognition.  With this Tylerfest session, we are honoring him, followed by a reception/discussion section (with refreshments), with a self-organized dinner outing afterwards. The focus for this session is on Bay Area collaborators and HVEI colleagues of the honoree, with each participant presenting exciting relevant work.


1:50HVEI-240
An introduction to Christopher Tyler, John Brabyn, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States)

1:55HVEI-227
Vision scientist Chris Tyler - An appreciation of his contributions, Gerald Westheimer, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2:00HVEI-241
Christopher Tyler - his early days c. 1975-1980, Ken Nakayama, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2:05HVEI-228
Paradoxical, quasi-ideal, spatial summation in the modelfest data, Stanley Klein, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2:20HVEI-229
Modulate this! CWT measures the spatial sensitivity of higher-order quantities, Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)

2:35HVEI-230
"Trust the Psychophysics”. Applying Tyler’s precepts to computer vision, Lauren Barghout, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2:50HVEI-231
The notorious CWT: Adventures with Christopher Tyler, Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States)

3:05HVEI-232
A retrospective of our collaboration, Leonid Kontsevich, Entrepreneur (United States)



3:20 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

The Art of Science: The ‘Magic Eyes’ of Christopher Tyler, Part 2

Session Chair: Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
3:50 – 5:35 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

3:50HVEI-233
Christopher Tyler through the looking glass... of HVEI, Bernice Rogowitz, Visual Perspectives and Columbia University (United States)

4:05HVEI-234
The role of rigorous computer-aided image analysis in fine art authentication, David Stork, Rambus Labs (United States)

4:20HVEI-235
Forty years of human stereopsis, Anthony Norcia, Stanford University (United States)

4:35HVEI-236
Factors of the visual mind and brain: Normal individual differences in the spatiotemporal sensitivities of adults and infants, David Peterzell, John F. Kennedy University (United States)

4:50HVEI-237
Quantum jump into the brain, Lora Likova, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States)

5:05HVEI-238
Explorations into the light and dark sides of the visual system, Hoover Chan, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

5:20HVEI-239
Light, quanta and vision: A metaphysical evolution, Christopher Tyler, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States)

While long-standing HVEI committee member, Christopher Tyler, shows no signs of retiring, his attainment of his 75th year, and his seminal contributions ranging from binocular vision and stereopsis through art and consciousness to brain mechanisms and brain imaging, are certainly deserving of recognition.  With this Tylerfest session, we are honoring him, followed by a reception/discussion section (with refreshments), with a self-organized dinner outing afterwards. The focus for this session is on Bay Area collaborators and HVEI colleagues of the honoree, with each participant presenting exciting relevant work.



HVEI Conference Wrap-up Discussion (Thursday)

Moderators: Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); and Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
5:45 – 6:30 PM
Grand Peninsula Ballroom A

Please join us for a lively discussion of today's presentations. Participate in an interactive, moderated discussion, where key topics and questions are discussed from many perspectives, reflecting the diverse HVEI community.


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Important Dates
Call for Papers Announced 1 Mar 2018
Journal-first Submissions Due 30 Jun 2018
Abstract Submission Site Opens 1 May 2018
Review Abstracts Due (refer to For Authors page
 · Early Decision Ends 30 Jun 2018
· Regular Submission Ends 8 Sept 2018
· Extended Submission Ends 25 Sept 2018
 Final Manuscript Deadlines  
 · Fast Track Manuscripts Due 14 Nov 2018 
 · Final Manuscripts Due 1 Feb 2019 
Registration Opens 23 Oct 2018
Early Registration Ends 18 Dec 2018
Hotel Reservation Deadline 3 Jan 2019
Conference Begins 13 Jan 2019


 
View 2019 Proceedings
View 2018 Proceedings
View 2017 Proceedings
View 2016 Proceedings

Conference Chairs
Damon Chandler, Shizuoka University (Japan); Mark McCourt, North Dakota State University (United States); Jeffrey Mulligan, NASA Ames Research Center (United States) 

Program Committee
Albert Ahumada, NASA Ames Research Center (United States); Kjell Brunnström, Acreo AB (Sweden); Claus-Christian Carbon, University of Bamberg (Germany); Scott Daly, Dolby Laboratories, Inc. (United States); Huib de Ridder, Technische Universiteit Delft (Netherlands);  Ulrich Engelke, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (Australia); Elena Fedorovskaya, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States); James Ferwerda, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States); Jennifer Gille, Oculus VR (United States); Sergio Goma, Qualcomm Technologies Inc. (United States); Hari Kalva, Florida Atlantic University (United States); Stanley Klein, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Patrick Le Callet, Université de Nantes (France); Lora Likova, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States); Mónica López-González, La Petite Noiseuse Productions (United States); Laura McNamara, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Thrasyvoulos Pappas, Northwestern University (United States); Adar Pelah, University of York (United Kingdom); Eliezer Peli, Schepens Eye Research Institute (United States); Sylvia Pont, Technische Universiteit Delft (Netherlands); Judith Redi, Exact (the Netherlands); Hawley Rising, Consultant (United States); Bernice Rogowitz, Visual Perspectives (United States); Sabine Süsstrunk, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Christopher Tyler, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute (United States); Andrew Watson, Apple Inc. (United States); Michael Webster, University of Nevada, Reno (United States)