Important Dates

JIST-first Deadline Sept. 18, 2016
Submission Deadline Nov. 21, 2016
Notification of Acceptance mid Dec. 2016
Early Registration Ends
April 19, 2017
Short Courses Start May 15, 2017
Conference Starts
May 16, 2017

Exhibitors

House of the Blackheads in Old Town Riga Archiving 2017

May 15 – 18, 2017
Riga, Latvia

The IS&T Archiving Conference brings together an international community of imaging experts and technicians as well as curators, managers, and researchers from libraries, archives, museums, records management repositories, information technology institutions, and commercial enterprises to explore and discuss the field of digitization of cultural heritage and archiving. The conference presents the latest research results on digitization and curation, provides a forum to explore new strategies and policies, and reports on successful projects that can serve as benchmarks in the field. Archiving 2017 is a blend of short courses, keynote talks, peer-reviewed oral and interactive (poster) presentations, an exhibit, and social events offering attendees a unique opportunity for gaining and exchanging knowledge and building networks among professionals.

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Short Courses

Short Courses At-a-Glance
Advanced Imaging Imaging and Best Practices Asset Management File Formats and Validation
8:00 – 12:00
Computational Photography Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documentation and Archiving: Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and Photogrammetry
8:00 – 12:00
Scanner & Camera Imaging Performance: Ten Commandments
8:00 – 12:00
Canceled
8:00 – 12:00
NEW for 2017
ArchSC04
File Formats for Preservation
13:30 – 15:30
Revised for 2017
ArchSC05
Spectral Imaging – Digital Spectral Capture
13:30 – 15:30
NEW for 2017
ArchSC06
Fundamentals of Color Measurement
13:30 – 15:30
ArchSC07
Digital Collection Development
13:30 – 15:30
NEW for 2017
ArchSC08
PDF/A Challenges and Validation Tools
15:45 – 17:45
NEW for 2017
ArchSC09
Spectral Imaging – Digital Spectral Image Processing
15:45 – 17:45
NEW for 2017
ArchSC10
Quality Assurance Workflows for Digitization Projects
15:45 – 17:45
NEW for 2017
ArchSC11
Introducing the Open Source Software Suite Kitodo . . .
15:45 – 17:45
NEW for 2017
ArchSC12
Cancelled

 

Short Course Fees 
Register for 3 classes and take 10% off the total course registration fee.  See Registration form for details, or enter the coupon code "PICK3arch" at checkout.
 If you register: on or before
April 16 
After
April 16
 
 2-hour
Member  $145  $195
 Non-Member  $170  $220
 Student  $60  $110
     
 4-hour
 Member  $220  $270
 Non-Member  $245  $205
 Student  $85  $135

 

 

ArchSC01: Computational Photography Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documentation and Archiving: Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and Photogrammetry

8:00 – 12:00 (4 hours)
Instructor: Carla Schroer, Cultural Heritage Imaging

Through lectures, demonstrations, and discussion, this course provides a condensed overview of computational photography and its application to cultural heritage. Computational photography extracts and synthesizes information from image sequences to create a new image containing information not found in any single image in the sequence. The course offers an intensive introduction to the technologies, software, photographic equipment, and methods for reflectance transformation imaging (RTI), and 3D photogrammetry—techniques being applied to a variety of art objects.

RTI creates scientific digital representations of an imaging subject’s shape and color. These digital representations are generated from image sequences where the light illuminating the photo’s subject is moved to a new location for each photograph. The lighting information is mathematically synthesized into an RTI image. The subject’s shape and color is examined in RTI by interactively re-lighting the subject from any direction and applying mathematical enhancements within an RTI software-viewing environment.

RTI is used on a wide range of subjects, including documenting low-relief surfaces like paintings and engravings. The course shows examples including inscriptions, rock art, manuscripts, and paintings. It also provides an overview of free RTI software, including newly released and planned updates. In addition, a demonstration of the RTI photographic capture sequence, using standard digital photographic equipment is performed  and new research techniques using these data sets are presented.

The first half of the course features new tools for the near-automatic recording and archiving of RTI contextual and process metadata. The creation of Digital Lab Notebook (DLN), which serves the same function as a written scientist’s lab notebook, is discussed. We explore the necessity for transparent evaluation of scientific digital representations. The goal is to establish the conditions under which a “real world” artifact can be digitally represented as a “digital surrogate”, which can reliably serve as a digital stand-in that can be used for subsequent scientific or scholarly examinations. New software tools to aide in saving the appropriate material for a digital lab notebook are presented.

3D Photogrammetry—the practice of deriving 3D measurements from photographs—can be used for documenting 3D subjects, monitoring changes to these subjects over time, and a wide range of other uses. Photogrammetry creates accurate and measurable 3D models in a wide range of scales. Recent technological advances in digital cameras, computer processors, and computational techniques, such as sub-pixel image matching, make photogrammetry a portable and powerful technique. It yields extremely dense and accurate 3D surface data. It can be generated using a sequence of photos and captured with standard digital photography equipment, in a relatively short period of time.

The second half of the course explores how photographic sequences of a subject can be captured according to principles that maximize the available information from a series of viewpoints to yield the best results. We also see how these software platform-
independent rule-based data sets can be transformed into 3D representations and
confidently reused by others now and in the future.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Have a clear understanding of two computational photography imaging techniques, how they are used, what they can reveal, and what is involved in adopting them in cultural heritage practice.
  • Appreciate the open source RTI software tools, with freely available User Guides, a free user forum, and other supporting materials.
  • Understand software independent photogrammetry image capture.
  • Learn about the Digital Lab Notebook (DLN), how archiving and reuse requirements are driving modifications to its development, and how to use it in the context of RTI.

Intended Audience: There are no prerequisites. Anyone from novice to expert is welcome.

Carla Schroer is a co-founder and director of Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI; culturalheritageimaging.org), a non-profit corporation that develops and implements new imaging technologies for cultural, historic and artistic heritage, and scientific research. Schroer has been active in the cultural heritage computational photography research community since 2002. Schroer leads the training programs at CHI, along with working on field capture projects with Reflectance Transformation Imaging, 3D photogrammetry, and related computational photography techniques. She also leads the software development and testing activities at CHI. She spent 20 years in the commercial software industry, managing and directing a wide range of software development projects including object oriented development tools, desktop publishing software, and Sun Microsystems’ Java technology.

ArchSC02: Scanner & Camera Imaging Performance: Ten Commandments

8:00 – 12:00 (4 hours)
Instructors: Don Williams, Image Science Associates, and Peter Burns, Burns Digital Imaging

This is a no-nonsense course on simple and achievable tools/techniques to build a solid digital imaging foundation for the capture of resilient and versatile digital images. We updated this course from a previously published Top Ten Tips publication several years ago. These include realistic color management, predictable behavior of branded capture devices, and new methodologies for rapid capture imaging. Specific and practical examples of the use of ISO standards and institutional guidelines in museum or library environments will be described. The elements of this course can be applied by digital image service providers, collection custodians, and device manufacturers.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Interpret and comply with customer imaging requirements.
  • Establish accountability for imaging performance problems.
  • Understand standards to characterize scanner and camera performance.
  • Critically evaluate manufacturers’ claims of resolution, color errors, and noise.

Intended Audience: Managers, engineers, and technicians responsible for evaluating and monitoring scanner and camera performance and emerging guidelines. This includes manufacturers, service providers, and content custodians. A working knowledge of digital scanner and camera operation and their common technologies will be assumed.

Don Williams is founder of Image Science Associates, a digital imaging consulting and software group. Their work focuses on quantitative performance metrics for digital capture of digital imaging devices and imaging fidelity issues for the cultural heritage community. He has worked for a number of large cultural heritage institutes in practical implementation of image quality controls and is the prime architect for the GoldenThread image quality evaluation tools. He has taught short courses for many years and contributes to several imaging standards activities.

Peter Burns is a consultant working in digital image evaluation, system monitoring, and image processing. He has experience in several areas of digital imaging: digital photography, mobile imaging, and cultural heritage.

ArchSC03: Program Management for Cultural Heritage Professionals: An Introductory Workshop for Management of Digitization and Curation

8:00 – 12:00 (4 hours)
Instructor: Michael B. Toth, R.B. Toth Associates

This course introduces cultural heritage professionals to best practices in program management. It focuses on methodologies for managing digital projects that create or develop data, integrate new technologies and data, and/or support digital archiving and access. This includes digitization and curation projects for collecting, processing, accessing, archiving, and collaborating with digital data.

Instruction supports cultural heritage professionals as they manage successive stages of digitization and curation projects from initiation through production and operation, especially with changing technologies and tighter budget environments. The workshop utilizes examples and case studies of program management techniques and processes that are applicable to digitization and data curation programs of varied cost and complexity in a range of institutions around the globe.

This course provides project leaders, managers, and others working or intending to work with cultural heritage digitization and curation projects with an introduction to the resources, tools, and capabilities for effective program planning, development, and
management.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Appreciate program management best practices that are appropriate for cultural heritage program planning, management, and implementation.
  • Gain guidance and techniques for managing projects and tracking progress, including developing:
  • a solid program management and data management plan.
  • an effective structure for task development.
  • an effective program master schedule.
  • Learn about requirements and resources tracking and reporting.
  • Learn about the business case for using established program planning and management techniques and best practices, and its return on investment.
  • Understand cost-effective methods for determining and implementing optimal technologies that meet cultural heritage standards for long-term digital data preservation.

 

Intended Audience: Cultural heritage, digitization, and curation personnel responsible for project success will benefit from the basic concepts and best practices of project management. This course is equally applicable to all project team members. There are no prerequisites except a desire to use effective program management and best practices. Participants also develop increased understanding that can help them tap multidisciplinary support from the scientific, engineering, and information technology communities. This includes becoming familiar with the vocab- ularies and standards necessary to address the requirements of broad governmental and external oversight and reporting.

Michael B. Toth is president of R.B. Toth Associates and honorary research associate at University College London. With more than 30 years of experience in program management, systems integration, and strategic planning, Toth has led teams of scientists, scholars, and technical experts as they help museums, libraries, archives, and other institutions make more data widely available for all. He has provided program and technical management support for numerous cultural heritage projects ranging from the Vatican Library, St. Catherine’s Monastery in the Sinai to the Walters Art Museum. He has led advanced digitization and curation projects to provide data and information for global access.  He and his teams support institutions across the United States, Europe and the Middle East. Toth studied science at Wake Forest University, where he received his degree in history.

ArchSC04: File Formats for Preservation  NEW for 2017 

8:00 – 12:00 (4 hours)
Instructors: Benjamin Yousefi, National Archives of Sweden, and Bert Lemmens, PACKED

The course is built around the ongoing work done by Riksarkivet (the Swedish National Archives) under the research and development program ArkivE 2.0—fundamental principles for selection of format. The result of ArkivE is intended to lay the foundation for government agency regulation and/or information such as guides, tutorials, and handbooks.

The aim of the course is to give a theoretical overview of and practical exercise in the challenges with:

  • Regulating what formats are suitable to store data for long term preservation of information.
  • Applying formats suitable for long term preservation in a specific case.
  • This course sets the stage for the two following courses: ArchSC08: PDF/A Challenges and Validation Tools and ArchSC12: TIFF for Archival Recommendations by familiarizing the participants with the PREFORMA Conformance Checkers and their importance for long time preservation. 
  • As the event is a workshop, the course interchanges between presentation and practical activity with the purpose of encouraging engagement. For that reason the participants should:
  • Bring a laptop.
  • Have PREFORMA Conformance Checkers installed (information about and links to each Conformance Checker can be found at http://preforma-project.eu/open-source-portal.html).
  • Have some files that could be used for examination.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand what is meant by “format.”
  • Identify the different types of formats.
  • Learn how to identify and analyse a file.
  • Understand which formats are suitable for long time preservation.
  • Learn about PDF/A vs TIFF vs XML
  • Learn about FFVI vs all other codecs

Intended Audience: Archivists, librarians, curators and other people working at memory institutions and in other institutions that need to store and preserve digital files, digital preservationists, IT researchers, open source software developers, people working in standardization organizations, and policy makers.

Benjamin Yousefi holds a master of laws from Stockholm University and has worked as a research assistant at The Swedish Law and Informatics Research Institute at Stockholm University. Since 2013 he has worked at the National Archives as a senior level administrative officer in the field of development and e-government. He has held courses on PDF/A for the National Archives of Sweden and was invited to PREFORMA as a domain expert on PDF/A.

Bert Lemmens is a senior researcher at PACKED. He is involved in the CEST (maintaining the cultural heritage standards toolbox), PREFORMA (pre-commercial procurement of three conformance checkers for long-term preservation formats), and MEDEA (design a graph for recording metal detection finds) projects. Lemmens has worked for the ArchiAfrika foundation as a researcher, NAI - Netherlands Architecture Institute as a collection registrar, and Amsab (Institute for Social History, Ghent) as a researcher in the European project HOPE, and for MovE (cultural heritage aggregator of the province of East-Flanders). He holds masters in art history and conservation.

Revised for 2017

ArchSC05: Spectral Imaging – Digital Spectral Capture

13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: Fenella G. France, Library of Congress

Preservation and digital humanities studies of libraries, archives, and special collections are quickly moving beyond simple RGB image capture, and now include a range of capabilities, including multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. Utilizing non-invasive integrated digital imaging systems such as these, provides the preservation specialist, scientist, conservator, curator, and researcher with a tool that can reveal useful, hidden, unknown, and preservation information about an artifact. The unaided eye often cannot detect features that are erased, hidden by overwriting, obscured by treatments, or faded because of environmental factors. Normal viewing cannot identify important provenance components such as watermarks or characterizing colorants to assure they are commensurate with the suggested time period for the document or object. These features on photographs, manuscripts, maps, and other heritage objects are important for scholars, authentication, fingerprinting, and the care of collections. Knowledge of unique identifiers are becoming increasingly important in the current worldwide conflict environment, where visible ownership marks can be removed, but unseen unique spectral responses can help confirm institutional rights from destructive human activities.

Looking at documents at various magnification levels and with a range of illumination modes (raking or side-lighting, transmitted light, reflected light, and the integration of fluorescence and different spectral wavelengths) can capture these elusive features.  Imaging with light emitting diodes (LED) illumination throughout the visible and non-
visible, in 23 spectral bands as well as raking and transmitted light for preservation studies, provides a system with safe conservation lighting that is integrated with the camera to minimize light on the object.

In addition to expanding knowledge about the range of information available through spectral imaging, the class discusses image processing software programs and the possibilities for processing spectral imaging datasets through multivariate image analysis (MIA) and other common processing techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and pseudocolor processing.

This course addresses and includes examples of the range of spectral information that can be captured; implementing and assessing spectral imaging technologies; and standardized spectral image system processes for capturing, processing and storing spectral image data and metadata, in support of scholars and heritage institutions. Generalized instruction is combined with a case study approach drawing from a range of examples representing a wide geographic and temporal scope. The approach highlights different stages of projects and the varying needs of researchers and users, from historic fragile manuscripts to Mayan flasks.

The course also examines the interaction and links between non-invasive analytical
scientific techniques and the cultural, societal, and provenance information contained within original sources.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to gain skills to focus on best practice, standardized procedures, and effective digital spectral project planning, including:

  • Assessing imaging modalities and processing to best meet the needs of specific research.
  • Integrating the priorities of scholars, scientists, and researchers in project design.
  • Managing and integrating data and metadata.
  • Balancing schedule and cost, as well as quality, conservation, and efficiency.
  • Assessing impact in relation to access for end users.

Intended Audience: This course will support a wide range of professionals who work on or are planning to work on collaborative, multidisciplinary projects that requires spectral imaging. These include preservation professionals and scholars; scientists and engineers; digital specialists; database administrators; program managers and directors; archivists, curators, librarians, and researchers.

Fenella France is chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress researching non-destructive imaging techniques and prevention of environmental degradation to collections. She received her PhD from Otago University, New Zealand. After lecturing at Otago, she was the research scientist for the Star-Spangled Banner project at the Smithsonian Institution. An international specialist on polymer aging and environmental deterioration, she focuses on links between mechanical and chemical properties from environment and treatment. France has worked on numerous projects including Pre-Columbian mummies and textiles, the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, and standards for cultural heritage. With more than three decades of experience, she serves on a range of professional committees for cultural heritage preservation and maintains close links and collaborations with colleagues from academic, cultural, forensic, and federal institutions. She is currently the Distinguished Presidential Fellow for the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).

ArchSC06: Fundamentals of Color Measurement  NEW for 2017 

13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: David R. Wyble, Avian Rochester, LLC

This course begins by defining the basic terms describing the instruments and quantities used in color measurement. The instrumentation, spectrophotometers, and spectroradiometers, are introduced by describing the applications for each type of device. The devices include those making traditional spot-measurement as well as those designed to capture an entire image of color data (imaging colorimeters). To understand how accuracy is maintained, instrument calibration is described. Since most modern devices measure spectral data, the connection between measured spectral data and CIELAB colorimetry is also described, along with various color difference metrics. While seemingly simple, the transformation from spectra to CIELAB comes with many implications that are explained. The overall goal is to understand the concepts, procedures, implications, and assumptions of proper color measurements.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand the details and procedures leading to proper color measurements.
  • Understand the use, calibration, and applications for spot spectrophotometers and imaging-colorimeters.
  • Understand the point of “hand-off” from spectral measurements to colorimetric calculations.
  • Interpret measurement results, and the implications of the various parameters in CIELAB calculations.

Intended Audience: Anyone responsible for making or interpreting color measurements. 

A technical background is not required, although an understanding of basic scientific principles will be very helpful.

David R. Wyble is president and founder of Avian Rochester, LLC. Since 2011, Avian Rochester has been delivering color standards; traditional and custom measurements; and consulting services to the color industry. Prior to founding Avian Rochester, Wyble was a color scientist within the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and before that a member of research & technology staff at Xerox Corp. He holds a BS in computer science and MS and PhD in color science from RIT and Chiba University, respectively.

ArchSC07: Digital Collection Development

13:30 – 15:30 (2 hours)
Instructor: John Sarnowski, ResCarta Foundation

This is an introductory course on the use of open/free software to create, validate, index, search, display, and maintain a digital archive of various materials including photographs, oral histories, newspapers, and books.

Learn how to take simple digital files and create a knowledge base of standardized archival digital objects, complete with Library of Congress metadata. Learn how to build a collection and host it. Make your full text searchable oral histories to FADGI guidelines. Capture audio files with Audacitytm, use digital cameras and scanners to create full-text searchable, harvestable archives with Tomcattm, ResCartatm, and jOAI.

Take the free and open source tools and knowledge with you to create a growing and sustainable archive.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand the types of equipment, software and time required to convert analog objects to digital.
  • Identify the various types of metadata and how they can be created.
  • Understand the difference between a digital file and a digital object.
  • Understand the use of OCR/AAT software and its limitations
  • List best practice formats for long term storage and reuse.

 

Intended Audience: This workshop is intended to be relevant to a wide audience, but will be particularly relevant to those cultural heritage professionals tasked with converting analog materials to digital.

John Sarnowski has more than 25 years experience in building digital collections. He was responsible for creating millions of digital objects for learned societies, libraries, and major corporations as the  director of Imaging Products at Northern Micrographics. Projects included "The Making of America", JSTOR, and Historic Pittsburgh. He currently is a director of the ResCarta Foundation.

ArchSC08: PDF/A Challenges and Validation Tools  NEW for 2017 

13:30 – 15:30 ( 2 hours)
Instructors: Carl Wilson, Open Preservation Foundation, and Boris Doubrov, Dual Lab

PDF/A is an ISO-standardised version of the Portable Document Format (PDF). The standard addresses issues concerning the long term preservation of electronic documents. This is implemented by restricting document features that are problematic when archiving documents such as encryption, metadata, and external fonts.

The course comprises presentations and practical demonstrations that provide an introduction to the PDF/A format, its applications, and how institutions can use veraPDF software in their PDF/A workflows.

The course begins with an introduction to the PDF format, the PDF/A standards, and PDF/A validation. This is followed by an investigation of some of the common issues encountered when validating PDF/A documents. These are explored through demonstrations using the veraPDF software to process PDF documents. The class demonstrates how the veraPDF toolkit can be used to validate PDF/A documents and report the results and look at the results of the validation process and help participants to understand the preservation risks associated with some particular issues. The course also covers problems that might be encountered in using PDF/A and associated legal aspects.

Participants should bring their laptops for the demos/exercise.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand what PDF/A is and is not.
  • Appreciate different PDF/A versions (1, 2 and 3) and conformance levels (a, b, and u).
  • Learn the choices presented by the variety of PDF/A flavours helping them to make the right decisions.
  • Learn common areas of concern: fonts, colors, metadata, images, etc.
  • Understand some practical aspects of PDF/A compliance and the associated preservation risks and the open source veraPDF tool set and its uses.

Intended Audience: Archivists, librarians, curators and other people working at memory institutions and in other institutions that need to store and preserve digital files, digital preservationists, IT researchers, open source software developers, people working in standardization organizations, and policy makers.

Carl Wilson is the technical lead for the Open Preservation Foundation. Prior to that he worked for The British Library’s Digital Preservation Team on internal and external projects, including a spell as technical coordinator for the SCAPE project. He spent three years as technical lead on the planets project, developing the interoperability framework and service interface definitions. He also helped organize and run the Planets Service Developer’s Workshops. Wilson particularly enjoys hackathon style events, and is a regular attendee at OPF events, as well as those which were organised as part of the SPRUCE and AQuA projects.

Boris Doubrov is CEO of Dual Lab, the company subcontracted by veraPDF consortium for developing the industry supported PDF/A validation tool as a part of the PREFORMA project. He holds a PhD in computer science from Belarusian State University (1997) and another PhD in mathematics from the Catholic University of Leuven (2004). Doubrov has been working for more than 15 years in PDF technologies as a software developer, project manager, and business owner. He is an active participant of the ISO activity on PDF 2.0 and future PDF/A standards.

ArchSC09: Spectral Imaging – Digital Spectral Image Processing  NEW for 2017 

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Fenella G. France, Library of Congress

For background on this course and the advantages of spectral imaging of cultural heritage objects, please read the introduction to the course on page 7, under ArchSC05: Spectral Imaging – Digital Spectral Capture. This course  builds on ArchSC05, but can also be taken independently.

This short discusses, demonstrates, and teaches image processing techniques using at least two software programs and the possibilities for processing spectral imaging datasets through multivariate image analysis (MIA) and other common processing techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and pseudocolor processing. Open source free software (ImageJ) is the main software utilized to assure transferability of skills at no future cost. The course addresses a selection of standardized spectral image processing techniques that support preservation professionals, scholars, researchers, and heritage institutions. Generalized instruction focuses on a range of datasets from actual historic materials that represent a wide geographic and temporal scope, and includes the digital preservation of documents, images, and objects. The processing taught during the course include recovery of obscured text, including palimpsests, how to enhance and reveal watermarks obscured by thick printing inks, pseudocolor spectral mapping to show differences between inks or colorants that look visibly similar, and spectral curve analysis techniques to definitively characterize colorants, and changes due to treatments, or the impact if various environmental parameters characterization of colorants, and tracking changes over time.

The course addressing the needs of those working on spectral imaging projects and those wanting to understand whether the ability to process this data might be an additional useful tool for their institution and collections. Participants will gain skills to apply image processing techniques to a range of spectral capture examples.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Appreciate revealing and enhancing non-visible information.
  • Apply image processing techniques to a range of spectral capture examples.
  • Learn mapping spectral responses to identify different and at-risk fugitive media.
  • Understand characterizing inks, pigments, and colorants on a range of heritage substrates (paper, parchment, ceramics, and textiles).
  • Learn how to detect and track changes over time.
  • Assess the needs of collection users and how to deliver value-added information.

Intended Audience: The course supports a wide range of professionals who work on or are planning to work on collaborative, multidisciplinary projects that requires spectral image processing. These include preservation professionals and scholars; scientists and engineers; digital specialists, database administrators; program managers and directors; archivists, curators, librarians, and researchers.

Fenella France is chief of the Preservation Research and Testing Division at the Library of Congress researching non-destructive imaging techniques and prevention of environmental degradation to collections. She received her PhD from Otago University, New Zealand. After lecturing at Otago, she was the research scientist for the Star-Spangled Banner project at the Smithsonian Institution. An international specialist on polymer aging and environmental deterioration, she focuses on links between mechanical and chemical properties from environment and treatment. France has worked on numerous projects including Pre-Columbian mummies and textiles, the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, and standards for cultural heritage. With more than three decades of experience, she serves on a range of professional committees for cultural heritage preservation and maintains close links and collaborations with colleagues from academic, cultural, forensic, and federal institutions. She is currently the Distinguished Presidential Fellow for the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).

ArchSC10: Quality Assurance Workflows for Digitization Projects  NEW for 2017 

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Martina Hoffmann, National Library of the Netherlands (KB)

This is a basic course on how to set up a successful, quick, reliable, quality assurance (QA) workflow for (mass) digitization projects for cultural heritage. As digitization projects and programs require a huge amount of resources (both human and machine) and substantial investments, the need for a suitable quality control workflow emerges. There are many software packages and suppliers around, and they all look very promising, so how do we make sure that we select those that are actually going to meet our demands? How can we make sure that we utilize what is already out there regarding experiences and best practices? And, last but by no means least: how can QA help the quality of your digitization?

In this course you learn what the key ingredients are for a QA-workflow and how to incorporate those ingredients—not just tools, but also the accompanying mind set—in your organization at all the necessary levels. 

Together we answer the questions posed above and then we take a good look at a successfully implemented QA-workflow at the National Library of the Netherlands. This shows us method, process, and results. The basic requirements for a quality workflow—simplicity, flexibility, efficiency, modularity, low cost, and high speed—are be addressed, as well as a look at the “mix and match” principle that guided the development of our example.

Finally, the modular approach that is key to setting up a workflow that can meet almost any demands in any program will be addresses in some detail.

It is possible to put things into practice straight away: you may bring your own digitization program/project to the course and design a workflow for it. You are also strongly encouraged to present your own existing QA-workflow to the course and/or prepare questions on the topic for the group to discuss.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand the principles of a modular QA-workflow.
  • Explain the principles and necessity of a QA-workflow to higher management and suppliers in order to get (possible) investment.
  • Implement the mix and match principle according to the given basic ingredients.

Intended Audience: Managers, program officers, project leaders, suppliers of, quality managers responsible for (mass) digitization programs. A basic knowledge of digitization projects will be assumed.

Martina Hoffmann is senior production manager of digitization at the National Library in the Netherlands for the archival section of Metamorfoze. She was also operational manager quality control of digitized products at the National Archives in the Netherlands. She has co-designed several quality assurance workflows for different mass digitization projects in the Netherlands. Starting with only image quality QA processes, her main focus now is QA processes including several fields of expertise from metadata to long term preservation.

ArchSC11: Introducing the Open Source Software Suite Kitodo: More than just a Workflow Tracking Tool  NEW for 2017 

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Frank Ulrich Weber, Zeutschel GmbH

This course focuses on the use of the open source software suite Kitodo. The software is managed by the association “Kitodo.Key to digital objects e.V.” and a founded release management. The two layers of the system, Kitodo.Production and Kitodo.Presentation, allow the users a flexible setup.

Kitodo.Production enables an easy creation of workflows for digitalization projects. The workflows can be tracked easily and the progress is always documented. The powerful metadata editor allows adding any imaginable structure and metadata element. Statistic evaluations are always available.

Kitodo.Presentation is an independent software tool to manage digital collections and present them to the interested user via a modern web browser. That is possible because Kitodo.Production generates standardized METS/MODS files in addition to the digitized objects. An index enables fast searches even within a huge asset of digital objects and the OAI-PHM2 interface allows other systems to access and retrieve the metadata of the digital objects in different formats. The TYPO3 content management system in the back offers functionalities even for the unskilled user.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand what steps are required for an efficient digitalization workflow.
  • Setup a digitalization workflow.
  • Appreciate working on a digitalization workflow.
  • Learn how to create structure and metadata elements.
  • Monitor a digitalization workflow.
  • Use statistic evaluations.
  • Find the right information within a huge index.

Intended Audience: This course is targeted to those responsible for digitization and digital collection management from libraries, archives, museums, and service providers of any size.

Frank Ulrich Weber is head product manager of the company Zeutschel GmbH. He has more than ten years of experience developing and implementing workflows and digitalization solutions for libraries, archives, museums, and service providers.

ArchSC12: TIFF for Archival Recommendations  NEW for 2017 

15:45 – 17:45 (2 hours)
Instructor: Peter Fornaro, University of Basel

The versatility of the TIFF format has made it very attractive for memory institutions for long term archival of their digital images. However, since the TIFF format offers such a great flexibility, it is not guaranteed that in the future a standard TIFF reader will be able to read some TIFF images. However, the limitations of the baseline TIFF are too severe for many applications in digital archiving. It is important that, besides crucial technical metadata such as ICC colour profiles (in case of colour images) important descriptive metadata is stored within the image file. Having descriptive metadata available (such as content description, iconography, copyright, and ownership information etc.) is crucial for every archive. Having this information in the same file as the image data guarantees that this information will always be associated with the image.

This course gives to the audience a general overview of the TIFF image format and its different specifications, a review of the typical errors that archivists make, and finally a list of recommendations to guarantee digital preservation of TIFF files. With the aim of achieving a participative course to ensure a useful takeaway for the attendees, a didactic presentation performed by the instructor, a set of prepared examples to be discussed among the audience, and hands-on exercises to assess the contents assimilation of the block are included in the course.

The course shows which are the most commonly used tags and values for these tags and which private tags are mostly used in the already existing TIFF digital assets of the memory institutions. This is the result of an extensive analysis of around 2 million files of different memory institutions. We will see a feature histogram that is giving a good overview of the data out there. Besides, we will present a list of typical problems encountered in the TIFF files, some of them are not compliant to the TIFF specifications but others, although conformant to the ISOs, are not suitable for digital preservation.

Participants should bring their laptops for the demos/exercises.

Benefits
This course enables the attendee to:

  • Understand the basic problem of file migration.
  • Choose from a proper file format for archiving.
  • Be able to value file types of digitization workflows.
  • Learn how to check if existing files need to be transcoded (migrated).
  • To judge reports of checker software.

Intended Audience: This course is aimed as a technical introduction into the field of file migration within digital collections of libraries, archives, museums, and services.

Peter Fornaro is part of the management team of the Digital Humanities Lab at the University of Basel. He studied electrical engineering, physics, photography, and business administration. His research covers modern camera technology, innovative scanning methods like reflection transformation imaging (RTI), colour science, and digital preservation. In his lectures he teaches media technology, colour science, and photography. He is also responsible for scanning projects and financial and business matters.


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