Important Dates

Submission Deadline
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

1 Oct 2018
Rolling Basis
Notification of Acceptance
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

Early Dec 2018
Mid Dec 2018
Final Manuscripts Due
     JIST-First
     Conference Paper

1 Jan 2019 (max)
15 March 2019
Early Registration Deadline
15 April 2019
Conference Starts 14 May 2019

Exhibitors



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in Exhibiting at or Sponsoring Archiving? Contact Donna Smith (dsmith@imaging.org) for details.


Join an international community of technical experts, managers, practitioners, and academics from cultural heritage institutions, universities, and commercial enterprises, to explore and discuss the digitization, preservation and access of 2D, 3D, and AV materials.

Conference Location: Arquivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo (technical sessions) and Edificio U, Universidade Lusófona (short courses)

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Keynotes

CERN’s Digital Memory: When Patrimony Data Meets Scientific Data

Jean-Yves Le Meur, CERN, Digital Memory project leader (Switzerland)

Abstract: Since 1954, the European Organization for Nuclear Physics (CERN) has developed and exploited accelerator technologies to run fundamental research on high-energy particles. Punctuated by the discovery of new particles and the invention of the World Wide Web, the last 65 years have seen an explosion in the amount of data captured, whether scientific datasets or multimedia documentary. Both are now considered an essential component of the Institute’s heritage, and they must be preserved for future generations.

Thus, as they are digitized, nearly 450,000 photographs, 4,000 hours of audiovisual material, and 6,000 hours of sound recordings from the past are now being added to the data acquired digitally. This massive digitization gives access to content full of surprises, and to new projects of enhancement through art, cinema, or virtual reality.

This exciting content is gaining a new audience at the same time that it is subject to the new risks of digital obsolescence. By managing it on the same infrastructure as the physics data, the multimedia heritage benefits from common developments. In particular the two content types will share a preservation platform, under construction, conforming to the OAIS model and based on the open source software Invenio and Archivematica.

Jean-Yves Le Meur is currently the head of the CERN’s Digital Memory project, which was started in 2016. Its goal is to ensure the long-term preservation in digital format of the historical and recent assets of the organization. He set up his first web server in 1993, before leading, as section leader, the developments of the CERN Document Server, Library, Multimedia, and Webcast services in the following years. In 2002, he launched and managed the underlying open source Institutional Repository software Invenio and he created its sister application, Indico, dedicated to the capture and management of conference content. Today, these software programs are used world-wide and, since 2013, Le Meur has driven the creation of the CERN spin off company TindTechnologies.com that sells services on top of the Invenio framework.


The JPEG2000 Suite of Standards: Capabilities and New Opportunities

David Taubman, UNSW Sydney, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, Deputy Head of School (Research), and Kakadu Software Pty. Ltd., Director (Australia)

Abstract: JPEG 2000 is a family of standards that provide efficient and highly-scalable coding of imagery, capable of handling content with extreme resolutions and bit-depths; providing lossy and lossless compression in a unified framework; and producing codestreams that are highly-accessible based on region-of-interest and resolution-of-interest. Very recently, the family has been extended with a new High Throughput algorithm (JPEG 2000 Part-15) that dramatically lowers the computational burden of encoding and decoding JPEG 2000 content, while offering truly information lossless transcodability to/from all existing JPEG 2000 content.

While JPEG 2000 is widely adopted for the archival of still and moving imagery, the capabilities of JPEG 2000 are largely under-appreciated. The purpose of this presentation is to increase awareness of what JPEG 2000 can do, focusing on capabilities that could be of great benefit in archival applications. These capabilities include efficient interactive browsing of large media over low bandwidth networks, coding of imagery with rich color information (e.g., hyperspectral content), and coding of radiometric and raw camera data, as well as the embedding and incremental dissemination of metadata. The presentation also introduces the new Part-15 algorithm for high throughput and shows how it can benefit complex systems that are based on JPEG 2000.

Professor David Taubman is is currently deputy head of school (research) in the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications at the University of New South Wales. He is also co-director and founder of Kakadu Software Pty Ltd. Before joining UNSW at the end of 1998, Taubman spent 4 years at Hewlett-Packard’s research laboratories in Palo Alto, California. He received a BS (1986) and BE (Electrical) (1988) from the University of Sydney, Australia, and an MS (1992) and PhD (1994) from the University of California at Berkeley. Taubman has contributed extensively to the JPEG 2000 suite of standards, contributing the core coding algorithms for both Part-1 and the new Part-15, as well as the JPIP standard for interactive image communication. His contributions to scalable video compression and motion modelling are also widely known. Taubman is author, with Michael Marcellin, of the book “JPEG2000: Image compression fundamentals, standards and practice” and author of the popular “Kakadu” software tools for JPEG2000 developers. He is recipient of two IEEE Best Paper awards: for “A Common Framework for Rate and Distortion Based Scaling of Highly Scalable Compressed Video” (1996) and “High Performance Scalable Image Compression with EBCOT” (2000). Taubman was a featured plenary speaker at ICIP'2006, WIAMIS'2010, and PCS’2013, amongst other major speaking engagements. He is fellow of IEEE and IEAust. His research interests include scalable image and video compression; interactive, robust and efficient communication of multimedia content; motion and depth modelling; and estimation and statistical inverse problems.


How the Market changed - And the Lives of Photographs

Jonas Palm, Riksarkivet/National Archives (Sweden)

Abstract: Since the birth of photography, preserving the image has been—and continues to be—a crucial issue. Similar to how writing materials—from clay tablets to parchment, papyrus, and eventually high-quality paper—evolved throughout time to withstand different threats to deterioration, the development of photography has, among other developments, dealt with improving the longevity of the image.

The introduction of digital information in a variety of formats—including photographs—has meant a paradigm shift. The basic concept of preserving information on carriers has changed to dealing with information by processing and dissemination. The constantly changing, and creation, of new digital formats, together with an ever changing digital technology, means that preservation has evolved from being a proactive preservation business to becoming a kind of vacuum cleaner strategy.

This development can be followed in the evolution of the themes addressed at the Society for Imaging Science and Technology’s Archiving Conferences, since their start in 2004 in San Antonio, Texas. This presentation mainly looks at how photography has changed in the last 20 years and how that has altered the lives—not only of the photographs, from film and prints to images only viewed on monitors—but also of those who work to preserve these “objects”.

Jonas Palm is currently director of preservation strategies at the Riksarkivet/National Archives in Sweden; prior to this, he served as their head of preservation (2002-2016). Palm began his career as a conservator at the School of Conservation, Academy of Fine arts in Copenhagen, receiving his master’s degree there in 1990. He was head of preservation at the Royal Library in Denmark for eight years before returning to Sweden. Palm has been on the UNESCO Memory of the World (MoW) Program/Sub-committee on Technology since 1996, serving as its chair since 2009. He also served on the Board of the International Association of Book and Paper Conservation (IADA) from 1987 – 1999, was a member of the MoW International Advisory Committee (IAC) 2009 – 2012 and the OECD NEA Records, Knowledge, and Memory Project 2014 - 2018.

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IS&T Code of Conduct/Anti-Harassment Policy— The Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T; imaging.org) is dedicated to ensuring a harassment-free environment for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity/expression, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, age, language spoken, national origin, and/or religion. As an international, professional organization with community members from across the globe, IS&T is committed to providing a respectful environment where discussions take place and ideas are shared without threat of belittlement, condescension, or harassment in any form. This applies to all interactions with the Society and its programs/events, whether in a formal conference session, in a social setting, or on-­‐line.

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, sexual orientation, etc., as well as deliberate intimidation; stalking; harassing photography, recording, or postings; sustained disruption of talks or other events; inappropriate physical contact; and unwelcome sexual attention. Please note that the use of sexual language and/or imagery is never appropriate, including within conference talks, online exchanges, or the awarding of prizes. Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

Those participating in IS&T activities who violate these or IS&T’s Publications Policy may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference and/or membership without a refund at the discretion of IS&T. If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact the IS&T Executive Director or e-mail incident.report@imaging.org immediately. Please note that all reports are kept confidential and only shared with those who “need to know”; retaliation in any form against anyone reporting an incident of harassment, independent of the outcome, will not be tolerated.

Sponsors

 

 

 

Interested in Exhibiting at or Sponsoring Archiving? Contact Donna Smith (dsmith@imaging.org) for details.

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